Shooting long range help

thwatson2

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Nov 4, 2012
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210
Location
Charleston County, SC
Just asking for confusion going from 100 to 600 with 3 rounds. Get a spotter or a camera holder for your spotting scope. Then work your load out with knowledge where you are hitting. put a flag at 300 and 600 to understand wind at all zones. Take your time and practice a lot...it’s the fun of shooting
 

BHP9

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Dec 4, 2007
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226
Location
Ontario, Canada
I was going to suggest that you put flags every 50 yards in a 250 yard length.

A range that I shot at in Ontario Canada had a 300 yard range, and winds coming from the 2 side directions - from the left or right @ 50, opposite @ 100 and so on.

Glen Newick mentions this in his book
The Ultimate in Rifle Accuracy
 

tomsd

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Dec 10, 2013
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250
Great reads. Still tring to get the nummies at the State of Cal Firearms dept to release m 6.5 Creedmoor in Tikka 3X Lite - but for some reason - such as they just don't give a shxx - taking longer than expected. Then I have to drive an hour north of SD to get to a long range target cljub - but will love it when finally do.
 

Dr. Richard Gray

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Sep 11, 2019
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74 Ropers Landing Road, Golconda, IL
The vertical stringing is most likely a powder issue. Go to load-data.nosler.com and check your numbers to theirs. It appears that you are using the best powder for performance, but you may need to change your load to the maximum charge of 79gr at 600 yards.
 

Rooks

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Apr 7, 2020
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NC
1: be sure that your expectations are realistic if you shoot and plan to shoot that rifle as little as you do, familiarity counts.
2: You’re off to a good start on load development, but, if that rifle is well built with quality components, then you haven’t realized it’s potential yet. 1/10” improvements are often much more costly in time and money than the steps it took to get to where you are with regard to precision.
3: support system for the rifle must be perfect and ultimately repeatable.
4: are the fundamentals of marksmanship in place?
-you may wear that barrel out learning about that cartridge. It’s replaceable...
 

skipglo

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Jan 23, 2015
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Alberta
I have been a long time member here but honestly not a long time long range shooter. My local range for many years only allowed 300 yards shooting and it was often crowded. Well My wife and I moved to our own property a few years back and I finally cleared out a 600 yard range. How do you know when working up loads if it is you, the weather (wind and such) or the load if your groups are not the greatest? My shooting range is not too effected by wind (most of it is a clear cut path through woods) so I think I can eliminate that from the equation. I would say maybe 100-200 yards of it is slightly open to winds. So for example, I recently worked up a load for my 28Nosler. At 100 yards it shoots between .6- .75MOA at 100 yards. I had 3 rounds left and said screw it im shooting 600 lol. at 600 I shot an 8 inch group with those 3 remaining loads. 2 of the hits were within 4 inches of each other and strung vertically for the most part but the other hit was in between the two height wise but was about 8 inches left. So for an in-experienced long range shooter, how would I know if I pulled that shot, or maybe the wind caught it or maybe there is an issue with my rifle system (bedding issue) or a problem with my load? I understand to truly know I likely need to shoot many more rounds, but im just trying to limit the rounds thrown down the tube to hopefully preserve the barrel. I do not intend to shoot this rifle a ton so would like to keep the tube as long as possible. I will never be hunting to 600 (400 yard max where I hunt) so really it is not too much of an issue but I do want to try to improve myself. I am pretty consistent when reloading so I don't think it is an issue with my loading process itself but could be an issue with my load. Thoughts?

FYI, I do not have people near me to shoot with to confirm if it is me or the load or the rifle etc or to have someone help in person.
Patience and time and practice! 3 shots isn't telling you squat. As you said first time at 600. The farther you go the greater small deviations become and the greater the practice to correct them. One member suggested dry fire exercises.....he's right...it's a step to save ammo and a good test of your capabilities. This will help eliminate questions about you! Ammo is another story and I personally don't know a single shooter than is worth anything until 10,000+ rounds have been fired. Longer range is a consistency game....period. Fire another 500 Rds and ask again.....you will have eliminated one or two questions hopefully by then
 

Bigeclipse

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Aug 10, 2012
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1,831
I didn't see anywhere if you were using a bubble level. A shot not level can really screw up your group too.
No bubble level but I’ve been trying to keep my crosshairs as level and consistent with the target frame as possible. Does it really affect that much at 600?
 

david g ranes

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Joined
Sep 9, 2009
Messages
303
No bubble level but I’ve been trying to keep my crosshairs as level and consistent with the target frame as possible. Does it really affect that much at 600?
You would have to be canting so bad ray Charles could tell it. David
 

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