See how grass affects your bullet

coop2564

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You should shoot paper and see if bullet is distorted or impacting off round. shooter should still at 55% be able to center target, not buying that's the reason for the off groups. And quite frankly shooter was not taking much time to squeeze trigger. From time he loaded and settled in scope was like a second, hard to squeeze a good shot that fast.
 

BallisticsGuy

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Off-steel groups were apparently due to wind. Watch the mirage changing. What they showed was a single shooter with small round count experimental runs over a distance that's sufficient for non-grass variables to matter. Just doing an experiment doesn't mean your experiment was well put together. Typical result of non-scientifically educated people trying to science. What I see is an average shooter. Nothing against that, I'm an average shooter. I'm pretty good at designing experiments though and this one was not well designed.
 

Barrelnut

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I was shooting ground squirrels through tall grass a few weeks ago. Different scenario though. I was shooting from a vantage point higher than the grass, but the grass was taller than the squirrel. Grass was sparse enough that I could see see the squirrel, just not clearly. Was shooting through a foot or two of grass sometimes before the bullet hit the squirrel. As far as I could tell the grass wasn't affecting anything.
 

MagnumManiac

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The ONLY time I have seen grass affect a bullet was with my 17 Remington.
You could see through the scope the blue ‘puff’ of lead as the bullets impacting the grass before the target. Many of these shots still resulted in dead rabbits.
Have never tried shooting through ANY form of obstruction near the muzzle like the video. Just doesn’t make sense to me.
Anyhoo.

Cheers.
 

Greyfox

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I have not done much study shooting through grass but have encountered it in my line of sight on occasion during PRS matches and more frequently when hunting. Shooting PRS, the issue is target visibility and/or spotting hits….more so then bullet defection. The targets are generally steel. Hunting game, I make it a point to either clear the grass if possible, or change my location. Perhaps it’s not a material issue, but I don’t want my bullet hitting anything prior to the game animal, and spotting the hit is pretty important, particularly at the longer ranges.
 

jrock

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I had a weird incident once. I was shooting very low to the ground at 950 yards. The ground was pretty flat out to 100 yards in front of me. The target was just above the grass line in my scope. I was shooting a 338 Norma with 265 ABLRs. I fired four shots on paper. The first one keyholed and the other three landed in the same area. All grouped about 5 inches. Maybe the first one cleared a bunch of grass for the others? Maybe there was enough milage of grass interference?
 

Teri Anne

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Once upon a time in a land far away there were many instances when it was necessary to hit the ground and make yourself as tiny a target as possible. Never went out into the wild because they wouldn't let me, but guard duty and perimeter defense were yet entirely another story. Since one often did not have their choice of what tiny sliver of ground that one descended onto there were often obstructions in the immediate front of the muzzle. At the time there was no time to inspect or try to figure out of the grass or other vegetation had affected the flight path of the bullet, nor did it seem to matter since the rounds fired seemed to hit the intended targets quite often and with the desired results. These days the only thing I worry about is the dust and dirt that the muzzle blast is going to cause when I pull the trigger. Recently had America's Gunsmiths in Kenosha, WI install a muzzle brake on my new Browning AB3 300WIN MAG with instructions that it was going to be fired prone and that the blast could not be directed downward and spray dust and dirt all over the pace. The gunsmith that did the research and installation did his homework well. The recoil was reduced by 50% or more (300 WIN MAG now has recoil of a 12 ga 2 3/4 inch hunting load) which is quite pleasant to shoot.) Results from the first 40 rounds when breaking in the barrel resulted in no sore shoulder and groups that measured just over one inch using cheap factory ammo. Anxiously waiting to see what happens with handloads using Nosler, Sierra and now Barnes copper bullets. Both of my Tikka's, a 30-06 and a .270 will print a 5 shot group with all five rounds slightly enlarging the one hole in the target at 100 yards. The .270 at 300 yards shoots a 2.25 inch group the 30-06 not much larger and that seems to simply be because the .30 caliber bullets are a bit larger. All three rifles are going to be taken to a local 1000 yard private range to see how a conventional shoulder held rifle weighing 8 to 9 pounds compares to the new precision rifles weighing a lot more and unsuitable for most hunting scenarios.
 

precision.riflecraft

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You should shoot paper and see if bullet is distorted or impacting off round. shooter should still at 55% be able to center target, not buying that's the reason for the off groups. And quite frankly shooter was not taking much time to squeeze trigger. From time he loaded and settled in scope was like a second, hard to squeeze a good shot that fast.
That was due to editing, trying to keep the video as short as possible. I didn't want folks getting bored. He didn't shoot as fast as it appeared.
 
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