Saved so much money reloading!!

Tiny Tim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2015
Messages
876
To be fair, I started reloading in 1981, because I could not afford to shoot enough to get better at shooting. And I think I achieved that goal. Prior to reloading, I felt literally like every pull of the trigger was like a buck or more (which is was, even in those days, for my 25-06. I got started with a cheap kit from Cabellas mail order and some powder from a local place that sold it IN A BROWN PAPER BAG! From their larger jug. And #100 .257 pills cost under $20, primers were nearly free.

All the trips to the range to test loads has the welcome side effect that we develop better shooting skills, become aware of other variables that effect accuracy, and generally become better shooters. There are factory load shooters that do this, but SELDOM with the kinds of expensive ammo that long range guns demand these days.....

But the OP has a point, for sure. Now I'm starting to replace older dies with micrometer seaters, bushing neck sizers. Now I retire old brass for a new lot of carefully weight sorted Lapua or other good stuff. Now I obsess about neck tension, and work hardening, where I used to just shoot the case till the neck split and then move on.........

Still wish I had never let that 220 Swift go that put them all in one hole BEFORE I knew that I was doing everything WRONG!!!!!!!!!!
A brown paper bag? Lol My local gun shop at least put in a old fashioned wax paper cup with a fold top and hole for a straw.
 

lgwatson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2016
Messages
55
Location
Canyon, TX
Factory ammo was getting so expensive I decided to start reloading and save some cash!! With just $1500 to start, $1000 in components, $500 every couple of weeks for random stuff to try out, another $500 in components every month and 457 trips to the range to collect load data..... I should have a return on investment in no less than 200 years! I feel bad for the guys buying factory ammo :) hahahaha.

But seriously, reloading has been a blast and saving money was not why I initially started. I love knowing that I built that bullet that hit that gong at 1000, or killed that big buck at 500. It's a certain type of sickness for sure and I feel bad for anyone that got into it to save money haha. Especially during these current times!!
I'm in the same situation, but it's a great hobby.
 

Russ661

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
59
Location
Lancaster, California
I started reloading in 1980 and now reload for about a dozen or more different calibers, both handgun and rifle. I find my time at the loading bench to be therapeutic and much cheaper than a therapist. I can be as anal and OCD as I please and pretty much get it out of my system in a somewhat socially acceptable manner. To me that’s priceless! Plus I get to shoot as much as I please without having to buy factory ammo. For me a good day at the range ends with black dirty hands and a sore shoulder and no worries about how much I spent.
 

skipglo

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2015
Messages
1,786
Location
Alberta
To be fair, I started reloading in 1981, because I could not afford to shoot enough to get better at shooting. And I think I achieved that goal. Prior to reloading, I felt literally like every pull of the trigger was like a buck or more (which is was, even in those days, for my 25-06. I got started with a cheap kit from Cabellas mail order and some powder from a local place that sold it IN A BROWN PAPER BAG! From their larger jug. And #100 .257 pills cost under $20, primers were nearly free.

All the trips to the range to test loads has the welcome side effect that we develop better shooting skills, become aware of other variables that effect accuracy, and generally become better shooters. There are factory load shooters that do this, but SELDOM with the kinds of expensive ammo that long range guns demand these days.....

But the OP has a point, for sure. Now I'm starting to replace older dies with micrometer seaters, bushing neck sizers. Now I retire old brass for a new lot of carefully weight sorted Lapua or other good stuff. Now I obsess about neck tension, and work hardening, where I used to just shoot the case till the neck split and then move on.........

Still wish I had never let that 220 Swift go that put them all in one hole BEFORE I knew that I was doing everything WRONG!!!!!!!!!!
Not really wrong then.....just wrong now...I found myself in the same boat....with no Oars....sink or swim.....it all worked just fine to save money and shoot 1" or even 1.5" groups....then came the LR perfection game....and there went happiness! Good is never Good enough anymore!
 

basinman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2014
Messages
278
Location
Butte La Rose, LA
I did actually save money when I was shooting USPSA (IPSC). A local match every Wednesday night at our indoor range and out of town matches once a month. Then all of the practice necessary to stay sharp.
 

Fishdeeper

Active Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2019
Messages
30
Location
North Vancouver BC Canada
Reminds me of one time on the dock cleaning a limit of 25lb wild Chinook salmon on the back of my boat. Guy comes over and says...Wow, look at all that fine food..I bet you save a lot of money catching your own. I said “well I look at it this way...after the boat, the truck, the trailer, the fishing gear, etc..the first fish cost me about $100k, all the rest are free”
 

bstirling7

New Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2017
Messages
1
Well, right now I'm saving a bunch given the current price of ammo. Not saving vs. my stock though. Recently I was given some 9mm and 40 S&W cast bullets. I've still got some powder and primers and bought the equipment a while ago. Of course, I've saved my brass for the past 4 years (lots ready to reload!). My buddies also save some for me! I've got the fun of "building" a round. I've enjoyed spending time doing it as it keeps me looking at my rifles and handguns much more. Of course, I do go more now than when I just bought factory ammo but I'm able to take my family and friends without going broke.
 

baldhunter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2008
Messages
736
Location
Texas
If I had to buy one box of ammo for every rifle I own,reloading would quickly pay for itself.So,the more guns you own,the more it's worth it to reload.Buy more guns and have more fun.
 

bomberodevil

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2010
Messages
139
I began hand loading in the 80’s, mainly since factory ammo wasn’t available in good hunting load. There was very expensive top-end cartridges and then lower end factory ammo, not much in the upper hunting round. You couldn’t easily find Nosler hunting loads. Now that factory ammo is available in premium hunting loads, I still handload to dial in for sub .500 moa loads.
 

Flash21

New Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2011
Messages
4
Factory ammo was getting so expensive I decided to start reloading and save some cash!! With just $1500 to start, $1000 in components, $500 every couple of weeks for random stuff to try out, another $500 in components every month and 457 trips to the range to collect load data..... I should have a return on investment in no less than 200 years! I feel bad for the guys buying factory ammo :) hahahaha.

But seriously, reloading has been a blast and saving money was not why I initially started. I love knowing that I built that bullet that hit that gong at 1000, or killed that big buck at 500. It's a certain type of sickness for sure and I feel bad for anyone that got into it to save money haha. Especially during these current times!!
Well when I started reloading in 1974 I could load a box of 20 30-06 150 gr ballistic tips for about $3.75 if I had once used brass. Around $3.25 for a box of 222. And they were faster and more accurate than factory loads. Not today.
 

Mike Matteson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
819
To be fair, I started reloading in 1981, because I could not afford to shoot enough to get better at shooting. And I think I achieved that goal. Prior to reloading, I felt literally like every pull of the trigger was like a buck or more (which is was, even in those days, for my 25-06. I got started with a cheap kit from Cabellas mail order and some powder from a local place that sold it IN A BROWN PAPER BAG! From their larger jug. And #100 .257 pills cost under $20, primers were nearly free.

All the trips to the range to test loads has the welcome side effect that we develop better shooting skills, become aware of other variables that effect accuracy, and generally become better shooters. There are factory load shooters that do this, but SELDOM with the kinds of expensive ammo that long range guns demand these days.....

But the OP has a point, for sure. Now I'm starting to replace older dies with micrometer seaters, bushing neck sizers. Now I retire old brass for a new lot of carefully weight sorted Lapua or other good stuff. Now I obsess about neck tension, and work hardening, where I used to just shoot the case till the neck split and then move on.........

Still wish I had never let that 220 Swift go that put them all in one hole BEFORE I knew that I was doing everything WRONG!!!!!!!!!!
I still got mind.
 

CNC Apps Guy

Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2013
Messages
24
Location
Inland Empire, Kaliforniastan
Considering the main rifle I shoot is my .338 Lapua Magnum... match grade ammo runs $6.00 a trigger pull on a GOOD deal. I shoot around 1,200-ish rounds per year.

Yeah, I save money. With my current brass lifespan, I get match grade .338LM ammo for factory .30-06 money. I'd have tonsit down and figure it out, But I'd say my reloading equipment paid for itself the 2nd year. Just guessing.

I saved enough to get a progressive setup so I could reload handgun ammo. 😁
 

P7M13

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2016
Messages
730
Location
Orygun
Like others here, started reloading in the 80's ('85) because I couldn't afford to shoot otherwise.
I have been patient in my equipment purchases, jumping on it when a value appears.
Loading for 7-08, 338 LM, 44 Mag and 5 wildcats, my equipment has been paid for many times over. Sitting on >$10k in components, I have zero worry about ammo for at least four years.
 

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