Savage Chamber

SkipB

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I`m trying to set up my grandsons Savage Axis for him and I am trying to get the correct COAL on it. I am using a Hornady COAL gauge and modified case. The book says with a 150 grain bullet it should be around 2.735 yet when I check the chamber on this rifle I get around 2.935. I have checked this thing several times with different bullets and it always comes up around .200 bigger than it should. Has anyone run into this before
 

DUSTY NOGGIN

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yep very common , everyone that starts to handload asks this same question

bullet jump = less peak pressures

they do it so ALL factory ammo fits and functions safely

there is alot of good reloading manuals , this one is my favorite because it doesnt favor a specific brand . you could find a used copy cheaper im sure
 

Wolf76

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As long as there's room in the mag, it matters very little. It also provides some added velocity if you seat the bullets long.

Edit: (1)I assumed the OP wouldn't jam bullets and run them at typical distances off the lands. (2) seating the bullets long allows extra powder to be added without being overpressure due to the space not being occupied by a bullet. This translates into more fps.
 
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338 dude

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I believe what you were looking up in the reloading manual is the Sammi length of the cartridge and what you are measuring is the distance to the lands these are two different measurements
 

338 dude

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As long as there's room in the mag, it matters very little. It also provides some added velocity if you seat the bullets long.
I beg to differ it does matter, the added velocity of which you speak is a result of raised pressures by putting the bullet against the lands also known as (jamming) If you are on the top edge of your load this could actually be dangerous
 

FrogFire7

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As long as there's room in the mag, it matters very little. It also provides some added velocity if you seat the bullets long.
Sort of... Room in the mag is important, but don't jam the bullet into the rifling. That can make problems in a hunting rifle (if you extract the case and the bullet stays in the rifling, dumping powder into your action and also blocking your chamber).

Also, you are correct, the extra case capacity from having the bullet not as far in the case can add volume for more powder, thus a potential increase in velocity. But it would require more powder. Simply seating the bullet out farther wouldn't give a velocity increase (unless you are jamming the bullet into the rifling).

I'm sure that you know both of those things, but I just wanted to clarify for the less experienced reloader 🙂
 

FEENIX

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I`m trying to set up my grandsons Savage Axis for him and I am trying to get the correct COAL on it. I am using a Hornady COAL gauge and modified case. The book says with a 150 grain bullet it should be around 2.735 yet when I check the chamber on this rifle I get around 2.935. I have checked this thing several times with different bullets and it always comes up around .200 bigger than it should. Has anyone run into this before
You will need to find the best compromise between your COAL and CBTO so it will fit in the magazine to chamber safely, and of course between accuracy and velocity without jeopardizing safety (pressure).
 

SkipB

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Guys I have been reloading for over 40 years and I have never seen a .200 thousandths variation like this. I wanted to start out with about a .020 jump and work from there but seating the bullet .020 off the lands leaves a 150 grain bullet barely in the case. I’m not jamming the bullets into the barrel the bolt closes easily but like I said there is over a 200 thousandths difference between what Hornady recommends and what this gun actually has.
 

Seabeeken

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That sounds like its throated for heavy VLD bullets. My 338RCM has about .250 jump due to mag length issues but with the hammers it likes the jump.
 

nealm66

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It’s interesting the different opinions on throating long for a given bullet. While I was helping a friend build a 6mm for 115’s, pac-nor said they would need a dummy round and bugholes said throating long is a bad idea because of throat erosion and that they have a lot of 1k guys that are winning with normal throats.
 

FEENIX

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I`m trying to set up my grandsons Savage Axis for him and I am trying to get the correct COAL on it. I am using a Hornady COAL gauge and modified case. The book says with a 150 grain bullet it should be around 2.735 yet when I check the chamber on this rifle I get around 2.935. I have checked this thing several times with different bullets and it always comes up around .200 bigger than it should. Has anyone run into this before
Guys I have been reloading for over 40 years and I have never seen a .200 thousandths variation like this. I wanted to start out with about a .020 jump and work from there but seating the bullet .020 off the lands leaves a 150 grain bullet barely in the case. I’m not jamming the bullets into the barrel the bolt closes easily but like I said there is over a 200 thousandths difference between what Hornady recommends and what this gun actually has.
You will always get variations when measuring COAL, esp. on non-tipped bullets like the VLDs (machining irregularities, etc.). CBTO measurement will give more consistency over COAL. You want to use the CBTO measurement to establish your .020" to the lands, not the COAL. Below is how I measure and set my .300 WM. The .020" measurement is off the CBTO, not the COAL.


COAL CBTO 3 of 3.jpg

(COAL)

COAL CBTO 1 of 3.jpg


COAL CBTO 2 of 3.jpg

(CBTO)
 
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SkipB

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Base to ogive is what I would like to use I have everything to do that with and it works great in my 7-08 and 25-06, 22-250 and all of my other rifles but this thing is crazy like I said a 150 grain bullet is **** near falling out of the case its waaaay long
 

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