Ruger m77 mark II trigger upgrade options?

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Bigeclipse, Dec 1, 2019.


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  1. Bigeclipse

    Bigeclipse Well-Known Member

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    I have an older stainless ruger m77 mark II rifle with a terrible trigger. The rifle actually shoots very nice groups so I would like to put a better trigger in it. It’s very hard to determine which trigger I need. I found one from Timney triggers but it likes like you have to do some grinding according to some YouTube videos which I’m not exactly sure how to go about doing? Is this the only option I have? If so, what do I use to grind the new timney trigger? Any help would greatly be appreciated. I’m looking for a trigger which ends up in the 2-3lb pull range.
     
  2. Wyatt Johnson

    Wyatt Johnson New Member

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    I have a wood stocked MKII in 7mm Rem mag that is sub moa with factory trigger and a Ernie Paull Hunter spring installed. It significantly lowered the pull weight without any modification of the factory trigger. It does have a slight creep, but I'm used to it. It's a $10 option for you to try before you drop big money on a replacement trigger. A qualified smith can also stone the sear and get it breaking like glass. Don't give up on the factory trigger. They can be fixed. I've had several done. Good luck
     
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  3. Bigeclipse

    Bigeclipse Well-Known Member

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    It was actually my local smith who said don’t waste time with trying to work on factory trigger and go to aftermarket route.
     
  4. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    The kits are actually better now than a few years ago.



    I have a Ruger M77 MKII in .338 WM that I changed the trigger to Spec-Tech Industries. I did not have to do any modification and easy to install. It is now discontinued but you can still occasionally find it on e-bay for under $90.

    The Timney might end up a drop-in too but you do not know until you try it.
     
  5. Wyatt Johnson

    Wyatt Johnson New Member

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    My experience on Mark II's in 257 Roberts, 25-06, 7mm Rem mag, 308 Win and 338 Win Mag has been different. I tried a Rifle Basix and a Timney before I discovered how simple and inexpensive a light spring changeout can be. The factory trigger is rugged and safe. No grinding or adjustments to be made. It is not match grade for sure, but I have no complaints. I did like the Timney over the Rifle Basix in a replacement option.
     
  6. Hespco

    Hespco Well-Known Member

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    Took the existing Ruger spring to my local hardware store to compare on diam. . Spent $1.50 on a slightly longer softer spring. In use for two tears now , perfection.
     
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  7. Ross1147

    Ross1147 Well-Known Member

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    I initially went with a lighter spring and had my brother in law (was going to college to be Smith, later abandoned it) file the sear and trigger down. It was much better than factory, but I thought it was still lacking so I bought a timney. I did have to file down the bottom cylindrical part of the 3 position safety. I took it slow, took it slow then got a little over zealous and took a little too much off. The trigger now moves when the guns on safety, which I’m a little apprehensive about, but I’ve tired to get it to go off (banging buttpad on ground, pulling trigger as hard as I can, etc) and it doesn’t fire in either safety position so I think I’m good? Guess the moral of the story is take it slow and check the fit often if you go with the Timney.
     
  8. Bigeclipse

    Bigeclipse Well-Known Member

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    What did you use to file? Hand file?
     
  9. Ross1147

    Ross1147 Well-Known Member

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    I used a small file set my brother in law had from his course. I filed a little, didn’t fit, filed a little didn’t fit, then filed a lot and it was a little too much. Should have just stuck with a little at a time.

    Also, below are the pictures on how to file the sear and trigger. You could make a gun unsafe if you take too much off here, so be smart about it.

    Ryan
     

    Attached Files:

  10. MagnumManiac

    MagnumManiac Well-Known Member

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    I also use Timney triggers in all M77's I work on.
    The grinding is simple enough, you need to make room for the safety lever and trigger assembly to match. I take around a 1/4" from the bottom and everything fits nice & snug.
    It neither lessens or makes the trigger assembly unsafe, so just do it.
    The trigger I have on my own M77 breaks at 1.5lb and is very crisp with no creep whatsoever.

    Cheers.
     
    stx likes this.
  11. Bigeclipse

    Bigeclipse Well-Known Member

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    Tried the mcarbo spring kit. It brought the factory pull down from 6lbs 8ounces to 4lbs 10 ounces. Better, but still terrible. It is a crisp trigger though. No take up. This rifle will be for my son to use, he is still in my wife’s stomach lol she is due in 7 weeks. This was her gun when she was little and we want him to grow up shooting it. Maybe the almost 5lb trigger will help him learn trigger control lol but I really don’t want him to have a bad first hunting experience by wounding a deer because of a poor trigger while having buck fever. I have 12 years to figure that all out though haha. I’m thinking I’m still going to go with the timney with about a 2.5lb trigger.
     
  12. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    It's never too early to start planning for your future hunting buddy.
     
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  13. codyadams

    codyadams Well-Known Member

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    ^^^^^THIS^^^^^

    If your competent with your hands and patient, it is super easy, just go really slow. Get the angles the same so the sear slides instead of drags, for a small .005" or LESS section put a 45° slope, and that alone makes a big difference. Use quality hand tools, NO DREMMEL. I use a small diamond sharpening stone and a magnifying glass attached to my vise, it doesn't take much, a regular file is too aggressive in my opinion, it may be ok with a very fine file. I didn't change the springs at all, just got the sear geometry correct and dropped the sear engagement down to about .012"-.013", it was .020" or a little more before. Once your done, smooth it up with some polishing compound and a soft rag, again no dremmel or power tool, there is no need, it's a small part, and you can go too far and round parts that should be square with power tools. On the most recent one, it dropped the trigger from 5.5 lbs down to a consistent and crisp 2.1 lbs, with proper geometry and a little over .010" sear engagement. Properly done, that us usually right where you end up, at least on the last 3 I have done. I like it better than the timney trigger on one of the other rugers I use, and costs nothing.

    Also, saftey has been perfect. Again, just go slow. trigger.gif
     
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