Rookie W/ First Rifle seeking advice.

Joined
Mar 5, 2010
Messages
13
Location
Tyler, Texas
Good info. Sounds like the step I've been missing is a good scrubbing and letting the barrel soak for an hour. It's all comming together now.

Since I live in town, and it's a drive for me to have a place to shoot, I think I will go to my parents to devote a day or two to break in. I can fish with the kids while the barrel is soaking.

We have a range that charges $250 per year, but I have access to 120 acres that I can hunt and shoot at for free. I figured I would save the cash for ammo. It would also keep me shooting in field conditions, which will prepare me for hunting season.

I plan on being in this for the long haul. I don't plan on competing, but would like the bragging rights that come with a 4-500 yard (or greater) kill.(After there is already meat in the freezer.)

Since I have a factory rifle, and 4 kids, I will probably gradualy upgrade and hand down for a while, but I can tell that in a few years I will start itching for a custom rig, especialy if my kids take to it.

I'm glad I found this site. All the other forums seem plagued with one line advice and responses. You guys seem to know your stuff and aren't afraid to give detailed advice. I have found other sources that coroborat with your info, but none as in depth as I have gotten here in the past week.

Thanks.
 

RockyMtnMT

Official LRH Sponsor
Joined
Mar 25, 2007
Messages
6,060
Location
Montana
Good info. Sounds like the step I've been missing is a good scrubbing and letting the barrel soak for an hour. It's all comming together now.

Since I live in town, and it's a drive for me to have a place to shoot, I think I will go to my parents to devote a day or two to break in. I can fish with the kids while the barrel is soaking.

We have a range that charges $250 per year, but I have access to 120 acres that I can hunt and shoot at for free. I figured I would save the cash for ammo. It would also keep me shooting in field conditions, which will prepare me for hunting season.

I plan on being in this for the long haul. I don't plan on competing, but would like the bragging rights that come with a 4-500 yard (or greater) kill.(After there is already meat in the freezer.)

Since I have a factory rifle, and 4 kids, I will probably gradualy upgrade and hand down for a while, but I can tell that in a few years I will start itching for a custom rig, especialy if my kids take to it.

I'm glad I found this site. All the other forums seem plagued with one line advice and responses. You guys seem to know your stuff and aren't afraid to give detailed advice. I have found other sources that coroborat with your info, but none as in depth as I have gotten here in the past week.

Thanks.

You are correct about the guys here. Even when guys get into heated arguments it still stays civil enough for your kids to read. I for one like that.
The details and willingness of guys here to review the same subjects over the years is great.

Steve
 

MontanaRifleman

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 21, 2008
Messages
6,194
Location
South of Canada and North of Wyoming
Good info. Sounds like the step I've been missing is a good scrubbing and letting the barrel soak for an hour.


This is the most efficient time method I have found to clean.

Soak patch with BTE and slowly push though with a snug patch, not too tight and not too loose. [ You might have to trim the patches and experiment with different size jags. For cleaning a 243, I recommend a 20 cal jag or smaller. This will also help keep from damaging your crown. Big jags snag on crowns a lot easier.]

Repeat this process waiting about 2-3 minutes between patches until patches start showing a pale color. Your first couple of patches will be black. Then they will turn dark blue, then start getting pale blue.

When you get a pale color patch, then scrub with a nylon brush maybe 4 or 5 strokes. Just enough to work it in and get the chemical process going. It's important NOT to use a bronze brush because it will leave false blue in your bore. Also important NOT to use a brass jag for the same reason. Let it sit for 20 min, wet patch through and repeat this process until your first patch through is pale.

Then scrub and let soak for an hour to see if any cooper is left. If there is, repeat and let soak for an hour until first patch through is pale. At this point your barrel should be almost completely copper free.

Shoot again, and repeat. At some point, you may not need 1 hour soakings. You will know this if you soak for an hour and very little or no blue comes out. Then just do the 20 min soakings until the break-in is done. You need to learn to read your barrel.
 

roaddog1m

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2009
Messages
306
Location
Timber Lake, South Dakota
This is the most efficient time method I have found to clean.

Soak patch with BTE and slowly push though with a snug patch, not too tight and not too loose. [ You might have to trim the patches and experiment with different size jags. For cleaning a 243, I recommend a 20 cal jag or smaller. This will also help keep from damaging your crown. Big jags snag on crowns a lot easier.]

Repeat this process waiting about 2-3 minutes between patches until patches start showing a pale color. Your first couple of patches will be black. Then they will turn dark blue, then start getting pale blue.

When you get a pale color patch, then scrub with a nylon brush maybe 4 or 5 strokes. Just enough to work it in and get the chemical process going. It's important NOT to use a bronze brush because it will leave false blue in your bore. Also important NOT to use a brass jag for the same reason. Let it sit for 20 min, wet patch through and repeat this process until your first patch through is pale.

Then scrub and let soak for an hour to see if any cooper is left. If there is, repeat and let soak for an hour until first patch through is pale. At this point your barrel should be almost completely copper free.

Shoot again, and repeat. At some point, you may not need 1 hour soakings. You will know this if you soak for an hour and very little or no blue comes out. Then just do the 20 min soakings until the break-in is done. You need to learn to read your barrel.

I thought I was the only one using a smaller size jag.
When do you know if you should fire lap???
 

MontanaRifleman

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 21, 2008
Messages
6,194
Location
South of Canada and North of Wyoming
I thought I was the only one using a smaller size jag.
When do you know if you should fire lap???

I have never fired lapped a bore. I suppose if the barrel is so rough that it wont break-in well, a fire lapping regime might work. It's spendy and time consuming as well. It would be my last resort for a bad fouling barrel.
 
Last edited:

liltank

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2008
Messages
4,178
Location
Central Pennsylvania
Since I live in town, and it's a drive for me to have a place to shoot, I think I will go to my parents to devote a day or two to break in. I can fish with the kids while the barrel is soaking.

We have a range that charges $250 per year, but I have access to 120 acres that I can hunt and shoot at for free. I figured I would save the cash for ammo. It would also keep me shooting in field conditions, which will prepare me for hunting season.


Sounds like a good plan. I should do that too. I live near a lake, so fishing may not be a bad idea when things are slow. I shoot at a local range that is only 10 mins. from my house that costs $16 a year. I need to renew now that I think of it. I will say you have the right idea of passing them down. I have a .308 that will probably be passed down to my youngest son. The itch to grow in this sport is crazy. I constantly want to upgrade. Just make sure you wife is on board. My has understanding to a point, but wishes I would give it up every now and then. :D

Tank
 
Top