Rifle weight

Raudy707

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She took this nice blacktail this year with her Kimber lightweight 280 AI using 140 grain Absolute Hammers. This bullet gets to 400 yds in a hurry!! Would have no reservations shooting elk at 600 yds with this load.
 

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Sneuses

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I am planning to get a 280 AI for larger critters than I normally hunt (whitetail) when we burn our points in a couple years. Most of my rifles are a bit on the heavy side an wondering how critical rifle weight is going to be hiking around Colorado for instance. What weight should I be focused on (without scope) or does 1 or 2 pounds not really matter at the end of the day.

I am sure hunting in forests is much different than stand hunting which is all I do today...
Pounds are PAIN. The fewer the better, lot of rifles out there right at the 6 pound mark. My rifle bare is 6.9 then add glass. Currently looking at something of lesser weight. Don’t forget your pack evaluate that and what you put in it, carry it say 16 miles that was my opening day hunt in Montana. You get the idea.
 

Raudy707

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Great pic, country looks more like lope country to me than the elk country I normally roam in the Rocky mountains though...:)

Those offside shoulders can really be pains in the ***
It absolutely was lope country. This was in Utah near the Great Basin. The elk travel from Granite Peak Nevada to the Burbanks in Utah and vice versa. I got her in on them traveling the lowland mountains and she executed a perfect shot honestly. The elk staggered downhill a few steps and fell over. My wife's elk was in Unit 21 Colorado Plateau. Place is brutal. Utah flats are wayyyyy easier. Which is why we had the 10 lb rifle! Ha!
 

Eddiejoe12

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Dec 24, 2021
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Albany Oregon
I am planning to get a 280 AI for larger critters than I normally hunt (whitetail) when we burn our points in a couple years. Most of my rifles are a bit on the heavy side an wondering how critical rifle weight is going to be hiking around Colorado for instance. What weight should I be focused on (without scope) or does 1 or 2 pounds not really matter at the end of the day.

I am sure hunting in forests is much different than stand hunting which is all I do today...
I think 7-8 is my max with the scope, at altitude it’s about ounces and not pounds in my opinion. Of course I’m old and chubby.
 

73driver

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Aug 24, 2011
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I have hunted the mountain states from Wyoming south to Arizona from 4,000 ft up to 10,000 ft. Gone up and down many a steep face. 7.5 pounds feels good and 8.25 pounds is ok. Heavier lets you be more accurate because recoil in a light rifle in a less than ideal shooting position-less than ideal form and the shot can get away from you. Under 8.25 pounds with scope should be ok.
 

73driver

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Aug 24, 2011
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Maybe I am alone here, will not be the first time? I have never put my rifles on a scale, I have never taken account of the weight of a scope or ring etc. I have lighter rifles and heavier rifles; I use the rifle for job. I am actually getting ready to order a mercury tube or two to install in one of my rifles, I am not alone on that either. I never recall my father, or anyone asking or being concerned of rifle weight! I do not think our veterans or military tell their ranking officer their rifle is too heavy; can they have a titanium spork?! I can keep going but I won't! I guess with the advent of skinny jeans, hair buns and beanies that are big enough for three people, I better go to Starbuck and get me a soy latte, NO!
LOL, doing rifle drill with a M1 Garand in early August at the Pensacola sea wall at 1300 in sweltering heat it never occurred to me to ask my kindly Marine Gunny for a lighter version. Of course back then I was young and fit so no problem. Now forty years latter and headed out to bust the big terrain I prefer to carry a rifle that does not tip the scales over about 8 pounds. Yes I weigh my rifle, silhouette match director will disqualify your rig if it goes over 10 lbs 2 oz.
 

Raudy707

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I carried a 10 lb 25-06 Winchester model 70 for miles and miles in my 20's. Young dumb and strong as bull, but that was my only rifle. I also hauled hay and cut 75-100 cords of firewood for 12 years to help pay bills after my day job. In my 40's now, I work smarter and always look for the most efficient way to accomplish tasks. No more packing bucks on my back whole like in this photo. Now I quarter animals and carry 7.5 lb rifles. Everything punishing you did to your body in your teens and 20's gets revealed in a painful way in your 40's. Knees, back, shoulders and my hands have taken a beating over the years. I appreciate my Kifaru pack and Crispi boots. Yes, even my boots and clothing get weighed and used accordingly. It's Hell getting older. My Grandpa always said don't get old....lift lighter loads whenever possible and wear ear plugs. You'll thank me later. Man, was he right!!
 

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Reelamin

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Raudy....man that picture gives me a flashback and laughs. Western mature 6pt Whitetail buck....only 300 yards to the road. Brother laughing, talking crud, and sitting down waiting for me the entire trip. One time...swore I never would again. To this day....+30 years since...largest piece is a hind quarter with bone in. My dad would always say "Consequence for choices son...you made it you own it".
 

Litehiker

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Mojave Desert, Nevada
RIFLE.jpeg

Stand hunting does not require a light rifle. I use this lightweight (6 pounds 3 oz.) 6.5 PRC Browning X-Bolt Pro for hunting Nevada's mountains where a light rifle helps a lot. With scope, rings and sling shown here it is 7 lbs. 8 oz.
SCOPE: Bushnell Elite LRTS 4.5 - 18 x 44 with illuminated G3 small "Christmas tree" reticle. Cerakoted OD green.
Norwegian HELLE GT hunting knife
 
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dogz

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SWMT
Yikes Litehiker that's a "Dolly" scope on that little rig.........:)

Sure it works fine, just looks out of place is all.......but it sure is nice to be able to see what one's shooting at eh
 

Pa Grizz

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Pa/Maine
I was planning ongoing with 160 or so grains in the 280. Do you have any reservation with 140/150 on larger critters? I am shooting 140AB out of my 7mm-08 already.
My 280 Mountain rifles like 145 gr Speer BT I have tried everything from 140 to160 gr the 145 just shoots better out of mine
 

Montana'eer

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Mar 3, 2020
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Montana
I think it all depends on individual. Some people can carry weight fine, some can't. To me a 7lb rifle with a good sling is the same as a 10lb rifle with a good sling. I really don't notice the difference after a while.

Where I notice the weight is upland hunting, where I carry a shotgun at the ready AND have to haul my dogs water with me- usually a full 2 liter bladder and close to another gallon in the pack. 8-10 miles is the norm. A 6lb Citori Feather Lightning O/U sure as heck feels better than a 8lb Silver every day.

If your trip involves backpacking- that's another story. I always do practice hikes for big trips. Always made the guys in our Scout troops do the same. Work up distance and weight, do it often enough to where you build stamina and find YOUR comfort zone.
 
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