Rifle for 10 year old.

Mike Matteson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
1,345
I would love a suppressor but can't have them here.
Got that right on the suppressor, but they add weight and become very long too. Plus about 12 months to apply and get the suppress. (form-4) I will add. Measure from the inside of the elbow to her trigger finger curled like the finger is going to use the trigger. That will give you a distance or length of what the stock length should be. So then transfer the measurement from the trigger to the back of the stock. Compare, and see what is needed toe be removed. Also you will need to allow for a butt pad. You can make the butt pad conform to the stock by sanding the pad to the shape of the butt. Either by a belt sander or a stationary wheel sander with a fixed bed to rest it on. I would suggest that you attach the butt pad to the stock and be sure it's center top to bottom and side to side. Mark out what needs to removed and with a marking pen. Then check the pad as sanding the pad to fix the stock. The other way is to attach the pad to the stock and sand it down while attached. Put tape around the stock where the pad meets the stock. That way it will protected the stock while sanding the pad. Be careful of your angle, while sanding. So hold the stock almost straight up or laying flat, if using a belt sander. I might add a 243, 6mm, and 25/06 will work and the recoil is light. The other is if you have a friend that may have those tools would help. A finish carpenter would have or should have those tools.
 

CHAGA50

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2020
Messages
70
Location
Roseburg Oregon
My daughter has been shooting a Cricket and 10/22 for a couple years and is ready to upgrade. She'll be legal to deer hunt in 2 years so I'd like to get her started on a rifle sooner rather than later.

Deer around here aren't hard to kill or very big. So I'm leaning towards .223, .22 Creed, .243 win or 6 Creed. With a removable brake.

My dilemma is the stock, I cannot figure out what would work for such a small child??? I read that the Weatherby Camilla is a good one but it still looks too big in pictures?

Thoughts???
350 Legend , short bolt throw , 223 case , no loud crack like the fast shooters , Kills everything :)
 

Moose Whacker

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2012
Messages
58
Location
Victoria BC
Don't be afraid to cut the stock to fit the child, you don't want bad habits forming due to a stock that doesn't fit.
I have done it for my daughter and now my two grandsons and granddaughter.
When they have outgrown the rifle there will be a lineup of dads wanting to buy it for their kids.
x2 on no brake, kids ears are far more sensitive than adults'.
 

brettman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2017
Messages
57
Location
Foothills of North Carolina
Bought a 6.5 creed in a ruger American predator, fitted up a Boyd's AtOne stock and haven't looked back. Ran a cheap brake on the bench and 1st couple years hunting, thread protector only now. Both kids shoot it well, son (7) took a buck last year with it, wife loves to carry it and has done her share of killing with it, and to be honest I like the balance of the little budget build. Adjustable lop and cheek means it fits everybody well.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20201202_163313857.jpg
    IMG_20201202_163313857.jpg
    1.3 MB · Views: 16

D$tring

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 13, 2020
Messages
97
Location
Idaho
My daughter has been shooting a Cricket and 10/22 for a couple years and is ready to upgrade. She'll be legal to deer hunt in 2 years so I'd like to get her started on a rifle sooner rather than later.

Deer around here aren't hard to kill or very big. So I'm leaning towards .223, .22 Creed, .243 win or 6 Creed. With a removable brake.

My dilemma is the stock, I cannot figure out what would work for such a small child??? I read that the Weatherby Camilla is a good one but it still looks too big in pictures?

Thoughts???
Find a 6 creed in an adjustable stock. Ammo availability is good. Great blend of power and low recoil. Also, I would not do a brake. The sound causes as many issues as recoil. If you want recoil management, use a nice recoil pad and a suppressor, if anything, for a muzzle device — reduces sound and recoil both.
 

FEENIX

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2008
Messages
17,623
Location
Great Falls, MT
Don't be afraid to cut the stock to fit the child, you don't want bad habits forming due to a stock that doesn't fit.
I have done it for my daughter and now my two grandsons and granddaughter.
When they have outgrown the rifle there will be a lineup of dads wanting to buy it for their kids.
x2 on no brake, kids ears are far more sensitive than adults'.
There is plenty of excellent hearing protections available at very reasonable prices. I spent my first ten years in the flightline (F4s and A10s), maintaining and generating aircraft with dBs well above 150 esp. during sortie surges, and back then, I used foamies + headset with no hearing loss. With or without muzzle brake, end-users should use hearing protection. I use hearing and eye protection when operating a mower and other power tools I have in my household.

noise-levels.png
 

D2wing

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
45
I started my grandson with an AR because of light recoil and adjustable stock. Now he is shooting a Remington 700 in 243. I bought the standard rifle last year and bought a youth stock on Ebay. I really likes it. I have also cut down wooden rifle stocks in past years. You can cut it in slices so you can glue or screw them back on.
 

Rflshootr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2008
Messages
430
Location
Baltimore, MD
I'd do a 243 Win, then later if you want, it can be re-barreled to a 260, 7-08 or a 308.
With a 223 bolt face, you're pretty much stuck without dumping a lot more money.
 

Calvin45

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2019
Messages
1,246
Location
Nipawin, Saskatchewan, Canada
I have an old savage 99 .243 inherited from a great uncle. It has an obvious line cutting through the butt end of the stock. I guess when his boy was about your daughters age he taught him to shoot with this rifle as his first centerfire and to make it fit he just took a wood saw to the stock and thought nothing of it, fitting a modified rubber pad over the back so it wouldn’t splinter or anything 🤣. Once the boy had proportions more close to a grown man they just wood-glued the old piece of stock back on. Can’t imagine doing this to a wood stocked rifle but also can’t say it didn’t work. Adds some “character” to this piece of family history I now own.
 

muleystalker

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2014
Messages
585
Location
Bay Area, Ca.
Adam, it sounds like you are open to a lot since you mentioned using an Origin action and manners stock. I built one for my daughter and it worked so well I built a couple others for me. I built a 6x204 and throated it to shoot the 95gr SMK’s and 95gr Bergers. It performs very well and is so addicting to shoot. I also worked up a load for the 80gr Badlands Bulldozer monos it’s lights out on deer with any of those. It also shoots lighter bullets well. I went with an 8 twist kreiger barrel. The beauty of it is brass is really available, it’s a straight neck up from .20 and load. It used .204 Redding bushing die and just used a bigger bushing. For seating I used a Forster micro and put in a 6mm stem. No speacial dies needed. It has more powder capacity than a 6x45, but a 6x45 wouldn’t be bad either. Give them a look. They use quite a bit less powder than the bigger cartridges too. I have shot rock chicken past 800 yards regularly with them. Take a look at them.
 

Swiftkill

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2018
Messages
203
Location
SoCal
An older Remington 700 youth if you could find one would be good (.243). Otherwise, a rough Rem 700 with a wood stock you would not mind taking a saw to would not be a bad starter either - may find one of these in .222, .223 or .243. Could add spacers at a later time increase LOP.
My daughter has been shooting a Cricket and 10/22 for a couple years and is ready to upgrade. She'll be legal to deer hunt in 2 years so I'd like to get her started on a rifle sooner rather than later.

Deer around here aren't hard to kill or very big. So I'm leaning towards .223, .22 Creed, .243 win or 6 Creed. With a removable brake.

My dilemma is the stock, I cannot figure out what would work for such a small child??? I read that the Weatherby Camilla is a good one but it still looks too big in pictures?

Thoughts???
Can't go wrong with a 243. With 100 gr flat base bullets can kill anything that walks. 22" bbl. Put it in an AR type chasis, im pretty sure HOWA has them. I have 3 Howard 1500s and they are reliable tack drivers. Shed be able to use that gun forever. Thread it for a muzzle brake and you can use it for long range Varmints coyotes and Priddy doggies off a bench. I disagree with not having a brake. Its fun. You can see your shots. I have THREE 243s, A sporter and two heavy barrels, an older winchester.then I built a custom 243, I wanted a caliber for everything.so it wouldn't just sit in my safe. I put a heavy 3.5# bench stock on it for prairie dogs and can swap to a lightweight hogue pillar bedded stock for walking around hunting . I dont even get a shift in impact because the stocks are free floated.vof course I pre hunt check them anyway, I have to if I switch ammo. 58 gr vmax ammo is deadly accurate at 4000 fps from a 26" bbl. Should be around 3800 from a 22" bbl. Ill have to chronograph that. The 100 grain fiocchi ammo is spectacular in 3 different 243s a HOWA 22". Winchester 70 24" and Remington 700 26"
 
Top