Rifle carry

nksmfamjp

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Jan 5, 2004
Messages
1,452
2pt sling on side of the rifle, loaded & muzzle down.

 
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Muddyboots

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Feb 7, 2013
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3,168
Location
Michigan
Good adjustable sling , muzzle up and muzzle taped as just a precaution against a million things that can get into bore while hunting. Muzzle up to protect crown and bore against slips that can happen especially the older you get. Just a fact of life to keep hunting. Thank goodness for trekking poles!
 

emp1953

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Sep 29, 2013
Messages
408
Depends on what I'm doing. If I'm just walking from here to there and don't expect to see something to shoot at then I carry muzzle up sometimes cross chest my shoulders are getting rounder as I age and sometimes the sling doesn't stay where it's supposed to. If I'm walking where likelihood of a shot is good then I carry muzzle down. I found out ages ago, carrying an M16, that the muzzle down carry method allows me to bring the rifle to battery faster and quieter with less commotion and arm movement than any other method except for carrying in hand. If I'm hunting with one of my Remingtons I'll put a finger cot over the muzzle, they have a front sight which keeps the finger cot on the barrel. On my other rifles I will put a piece of tape over the muzzle. I used tape once at the range and found that the muzzle blast blew the tape off before the bullet ever got to it. Never once found the tape with a hole in it. My main concern was always getting water in the muzzle and having it freeze.
 

Tomjoad

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Jan 28, 2021
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Location
Denver, CO
Kuiu QuickDraw for initial hike in to setup spike camp.

2 point sling muzzle up for active hunting. It’s an UL 1” wide sling with integrated loop for stabilization offhand. I have the top 10 inches impregnated with silicone so it stays on the shoulder. This is for the UL mountain rifles (sub 6lb) Mid-weight guns (6-8lb) I use the exact same setup but made with 1.25” webbing to better disperse the load.
 

chindits

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Joined
Nov 2, 2015
Messages
79
Usually in my right hand, but sometimes my left parallel or slightly muzzle downward. Muzzle taped with either electrical tape or duct tape. I don’t hunt with heavy guns.

I almost never sling a gun. It just never stays on my shoulders. If I don’t expect to see critters and I’m just traveling, attached to my pack with 2 pull release buckles muzzle up. Tried the Kifaru gun bearer thing but that butt cradle was too tacky a material. I don’t want to struggle getting a gun in my hands.

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jgs8163

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Sep 27, 2011
Messages
1,931
Location
Southern Arizona
How do you carry your rifle?
I use 2 different styles depending on my hunt plans. If a lot of climbing and a longer hike in I use this or it’s strapped to my pack.


Or if a easy hike I use this:


Both are excellent. The kifaru also allows for very fast shots if jumping something out of their bed. Also allows me to use both of my trekking poles and not worry about my rifle falling or better yet me falling!!!
 

Idaho Lefty

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Jan 29, 2018
Messages
594
My 7.5 Pound, Tikka Rifle, sits IN, a Kifaru, "Gun Bearer", strapped to my 5500 ci, EXO Pack, so that, I can carry, an Elk Quarter, back to Camp.
Rifle Muzzle is up and chamber UN-loaded ( with loaded Magazine, IN ).
Use Stix to shoot off and use the Pack to "prop up", the "Toe" of Rifle, to hold steady ( good for accurate shots to about, 400 yards in sitting position ).
And, I use Trekking Poles to navigate, the small, rough, Elk trails,.. up / down, the Mountain.
 
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Texas Speed Bump

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Joined
Jul 31, 2020
Messages
41
Location
Pflugerville Texas
After years of constantly having to adjust and re-adjust my rifle sling when I carried it, I finally changed to the Ultimate Gun Sling (https://www.specialtyoutdoorproducts.net/) on the two rifles I carry most. Tipping the scales at 10.5 and 12.5 lbs each, they are not light and considering how much walking I do when hunting (easily over 1,000 miles in my lifetime) I found myself either constantly hiking my rifle back up on my shoulder or adopting a posture where I always had one hand on the rifle or strap. After seeing the Ultimate Gun Sling commercials on TV hunting shows, I decided to give it a try two years ago. I've found that they live up to their claims as a 'no slip' sling and have made my 'travels' much less cumbersome. The one drawback to these slings in my opinion is that they are narrow and if you're carrying a heavy rifle and not wearing much padding on your shoulder area, it can get uncomfortable because the weight isn't being distributed like it is with a wide shoulder pad strap.
 
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