Revenge of the 640 yard Chuck [just who got whom?]

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by 7mmRHB, Aug 19, 2005.

  1. 7mmRHB

    7mmRHB Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    338
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2005
    Im writting this as a small warning about the handling of dead vermin.After I made the B.O.A.G.SHOT i carried the chuck back to the truck with no gloves .No thought of the consequenses. Now Im paying the price . 24 hours after getting home I was feeling bad ,cold sweat,weak and general flulike symtoms .Then the headachs started and got worse for the next three days. Next came the fever and chills for the next 5 days .On the tenth day a beautiful all over rash and a trip to the hospital. Just try to explain to a non hunter why a rational person would be carrying rock chuck around. They filed me with the appropriate antibiotics for the next 24 hours and then discharged me to battle this on my own. It will be weeks before the blood work will tell us what bacteria or virus got me, Tularamia or rocky mountain spotted fever fit the incubation sequense the best but I may never know. Im not going to let this keep me from hunting chucks but ill bet I wont be digging in a den or carrying one any time soon .good shooting 7mmrhb
     
  2. jb1000br

    jb1000br Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,307
    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2003
    WOW, he almost got you with an even smaller round!

    hantavirus?

    glad you are coming out of it...hope it's not something you are stuck with for life /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frown.gif

    JB
     
  3. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

    Messages:
    5,085
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2001
    Tularemia is a biological warfare agent. Maybe Ossam bin Laden is hiding out in Utah and has released infected rock chucks because he believes rock chuck shooters are America's last line of defense.

    With all the medical expenses, that was one costly bullet you sent downrange.

    On a serious note, in the South, tularemia is known as rabbit hunters disease. When cleaning the rabbit if you look at the liver and it has white spots then the rabbit has tularemia. You have to be careful not to have any cuts on your hands when cleaning them. Cooking kills it so it is allright to eat them and I have done so many, many times. In Utah and the Rockies the jack rabbits and the cottontails both may have it.

    I did manage to get a case of giardia in the Rockies long ago from drinking some of that crystal clear rocky mountain spring water. Now, the only way I drink Rocky Mountain Spring water is if it says "Coors" on the outside.

    Hope you get to feeling better before main hunting season gets here. Its only twelve days till dove season!
     
  4. Centre Punch

    Centre Punch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    676
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    7mmRHB,
    Get well soon, maybe you could use one of these:
    [​IMG]
    This an advert here in the UK, but you must be able to get these in the USA as well. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    Ian.

    "I meant to shoot the pike but the duck got in the way"
     
  5. gonehuntingagain

    gonehuntingagain Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    417
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Hopefully it won't last too long and you will be feeling better!
    I'm definately not touching a dead chuck, rabbit, squrrel, gopher, coyote, or prairie dog without gloves now!
     
  6. 7Rumloader

    7Rumloader Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    540
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    Sorry to hear about your unfortunate sickness 7mmrhb.
    Hope you feel better soon!
    Now you will have evn more motivation to shoot chucks at a distance.
     
  7. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,705
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2004
    I thought after reading your post title that you were going to explain how that chuck woke up from his coma that the hornet gave him at 640 yards and crawled out of the freezer to avenge his would-be assassin! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    After you finally kill him with a baseball bat and have him mounted over your reloading bench, you will always wonder if he is REALLY TRULY dead or is he just waiting for the perfect moment to leap down from his perch to attack you while you are turning case necks! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif
     
  8. Nomosendero

    Nomosendero Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,080
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    You have given me something new to think about. I have not
    thought twice about picking up a Groundhog, but I was allready leary of the blown-up Armadillo's. Thanks for the
    info!
     
  9. uncleB

    uncleB Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    558
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2005
    7mmRHB,
    TULARAMIA ??????????? looked more like you had been rolling around in poison ivy or had chicken pox. get well soon.
    ub
    p.s. thanks for the new moniker
     
  10. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

    Messages:
    8,857
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    If you would coat those bullets with a good antibiotic and continued to shoot at least 600 yds the the virus/whatever would be gone by the time you got to the trophy chuck. Also if you would drill a dimple in the base of the bullet and pack it with salt the chuck wouldn't spoil either. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    Glad to hear you're mending well. I appreciate your good attitude. Keep shootin'. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif
     
  11. Varmint Hunter

    Varmint Hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,528
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2001
    While we\'re on the subject.............

    What concerns would there be in regards to picking up Wyoming P-dogs long enough to take some photos?

    Would surgical gloves prevent any problems? They sure would look funny in the photos. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif
     
  12. 7mmRHB

    7mmRHB Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    338
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2005
    Re: While we\'re on the subject.............

    Varmint Hunter,pdogs are known carriers of the Plague. the doctors that worked on me said that most of these type of sicknesses can also be caught through airborne factors as well. gloves might not be the fix but should lower the risk somewhat. I do appreciate everyones concern for me but I am feeling better each day. the word ITCH has become a large part of my vocabulary recently.I guess I better go find the hydrocortisone. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif 7mmrhb
     
  13. 41mag

    41mag Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    752
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Re: While we\'re on the subject.............

    I hate to say it 7mmrhb, but I was thinking along the same lines as goodgrouper. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif I can't think of how many times, I, or one of my hunting buds, has had a critter come back from the dead on us, generally in the back of a hunting vest.

    Sorry to hear of your tough battle.

    Being an avid outdoorsman I try to keep up with the different viral and bacterial critters out there as well. Here along our coast we have an especially rough critter that eats the flesh away in short order. Bad thing is that a strain of it occurs naturally in stagnet ponds and run off in the swampy areas where we tromp through hunting feral hogs. This along with the lyme disease and rocky mountian fever, keeps us on our toes after an outing in the bush.

    Hope your over the worst part with no after effects.

    I will be tuned in for your next session out on the chuck grounds. I bet there will be one or two of them that hit the ground with extreme prejudice.

    Take care
     
  14. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

    Messages:
    5,085
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2001
    Re: While we\'re on the subject.............

    The primary precaution to take is to not get animal blood (especially rodents but now with west nile virus also birds - particularly my favorite- the crow)all over your hands if you have open cuts. Secondly, carry water if you are in a dry area and use it to wash your hands before eating if you have been handling shot animals. A simple rinsing off of the visible blood will reduce disease risk by about 90-99%. If there are streams of water around then that is good enough to rinse off in.

    When dove hunting which is in hot weather the birds have to be field dressed immediately and so in an afternoon of dove shooting if I am killing birds I will go through about a quart of water just rinsing my hands off. Another two or three quarts to drink to stave off dehydration.

    A lot of these things are transmitted by mosquitos, fleas, and ticks.

    About the same number of people get tularemia as get struck by lightning (based upon my quick check) and men are four times more likely to get struck by lightning than women.