Reticle hard to see at low power on FFP scope

CleanShot

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Hi

I'm not sure if this is normal but I got a FFP scope (Sightron SIII) and at low power the reticle is extremely hard to see. I mean I mean logically this makes sense to me given the reticle itself is in front of the focus so it at lower power it would make sense that it would be smaller but I would have thought they would have made the reticle at least visible at the lowest power offered by the scope.

Does this have something to do with how I setup my scope or is this just normal with FFP scopes?

Thanks
Sam
 

Senderofan

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Sam:

It's perfectly normal. You just use the center on low magnification. Because the values of the sub tensions remain constant throughout the magnification range....the reticle needs to change size with the level of magnification. SFP is where the reticle stays a consistent size when looking through the scope....and the manufacturer will tell you what magnification is used for ranging purposes.

Wayne
 
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918v

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What the reticle does is normal in that is shrinks and expands with changes in magnification, but this doesn't excuse the poor design. Better scopes have properly designed reticles with thick stadia on the outside that converge toward the center as you dial the magnification down.
 

CleanShot

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What the reticle does is normal in that is shrinks and expands with changes in magnification, but this doesn't excuse the poor design. Better scopes have properly designed reticles with thick stadia on the outside that converge toward the center as you dial the magnification down.
I think your right. This is a very poor design for a FFP reticle. A thicker outer line would have solved the problem.
 

EdWalton

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This year I bought a Schmidt & Bender with a front focal plane. Under difficult light the magnification extremes become unusable; but I’ve enjoyed the time spent dialing up & down looking for the correct magnification for various distances & lighting conditions.
 

FEENIX

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Not all eyes and FFP scope/design are created equal. :D

I have a Burris Veracity 4-20 x50 and SWFA SS 5-25x50 and it works for me. :)

Below video (not mine) of the SWFA SS 5-25x50 is similar to what I see on my FFP scopes.


Cheers!
 
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CleanShot

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FEENIX

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If I'm not mistake all these scopes have duplex style thick stradia on the outsides. This is not so with the Sightron.
You are correct, that's why I made the comment "not all eyes and FFP scope/design are created equal" ... didn't want others to misconstrue that just because you're having problem with Sightron's FFP reticle design that ALL FFP reticles poses the same challenge ... that's all.lightbulb
 

CleanShot

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You are correct, that's why I made the comment "not all eyes and FFP scope/design are created equal" ... didn't want others to misconstrue that just because you're having problem with Sightron's FFP reticle design that ALL FFP reticles poses the same challenge ... that's all.lightbulb
Gotcha yeah I think this reticle is just poorly designed for a FFP but I'll contact them and see if maybe it's me not adjusting it properly.
 

CleanShot

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I spoke to them over the phone. I will have to wait until I'm home to try this but the procedure they told me to try was:
1) Set the scope to the highest magnification.
2) Set the diopter on ocular bell to one extreme
3) Point the scope at a clear bright background (obviously not the sun)
4) While focusing on the reticle slowly turn the diopter adjustment until the reticle becomes as sharp as possible.
5) Drop the scopes magnification down to the lowest setting
6) Check the visibility of the reticle against a clear bright background

Sounds pretty similar to what I did but I'll try it as directed.
 

cummins cowboy

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your finding out what the wizards of tactical don't tell you because they do their ninja shooting at the range off a bench in broad day light. FFP has no place in a hunting optic, it should be reserved for scopes of only very high power. IE the lowest power setting 6x or 8x. which basically means not suitable as a hunting optic. a reticle that subtends the same regardless of power, I mean after all who wouldn't want that. The problem is there is a big downside to that. You found it they suck in low light and what good are all these sub-tensions that are the same size if they wash out anyways at low power? The only way FFP makes sense to me is if you routinely come off max power to make distance shots, maybe for mirage or some other reason. but for nearly all situations your going to be on max power anyways if your needing the fancy marks on the reticle.
 

CleanShot

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your finding out what the wizards of tactical don't tell you because they do their ninja shooting at the range off a bench in broad day light. FFP has no place in a hunting optic, it should be reserved for scopes of only very high power. IE the lowest power setting 6x or 8x. which basically means not suitable as a hunting optic. a reticle that subtends the same regardless of power, I mean after all who wouldn't want that. The problem is there is a big downside to that. You found it they suck in low light and what good are all these sub-tensions that are the same size if they wash out anyways at low power? The only way FFP makes sense to me is if you routinely come off max power to make distance shots, maybe for mirage or some other reason. but for nearly all situations your going to be on max power anyways if your needing the fancy marks on the reticle.
Geez more opposing information. This is set to be my third archery season and very first firearms season and as someone just getting started the amount of contradictory information is just paralyzing especially considering the cost of equipment.

FFP vs SFP
Mildot vs MOA
Turning your turrets vs holding over

In this case I was told you always want FFP because of the advantageous with one unit being consistent across all magnifications. I read quite a bit about it and there seemed to be pretty strong arguments for FFP especially for hunting situations. I'm now so confused.
 

cummins cowboy

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Geez more opposing information. This is set to be my third archery season and very first firearms season and as someone just getting started the amount of contradictory information is just paralyzing especially considering the cost of equipment.

FFP vs SFP
Mildot vs MOA
Turning your turrets vs holding over

In this case I was told you always want FFP because of the advantageous with one unit being consistent across all magnifications. I read quite a bit about it and there seemed to be pretty strong arguments for FFP especially for hunting situations. I'm now so confused.
This is unfortunate because of all the internet mis information. made worse by the tactical community. The tactical community with some exceptions think they know everything. They also tend to not be near as experienced shooters as many others. FFP DOES have certain advantages, but very real downsides. we are on a long rang HUNTING forum, so my comments are slanted toward that end use.

optics companies feed this FFP notion themselves because in their eyes thats what sells. you see scopes with drive shaft size main tubes. I mean after all isn't bigger better? FFP and coming in at 3 pounds or more.
 

Barrelnut

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optics companies feed this FFP notion themselves because in their eyes thats what sells. you see scopes with drive shaft size main tubes. I mean after all isn't bigger better? FFP and coming in at 3 pounds or more.
I just think the drive shaft scopes look better on rifles with the truck axle barrels you see these days. Couldn't resist but know where you are coming from. :D

Op,

Wow sorry to hear this. I own a Sightron III 8-32 SFP and love it. I hadn't even thought about their FFP scopes. But what you are saying makes sense. Sightrons usually have very fine reticles, makes them good for target and long range, but if they are using that thin reticle on a FFP, then I understand why it totally disappears at low magnification. The reticle style that FEENIX shows would be the only way to go.

This got me interested so I checked the Sightron website and they don't show on of the FFP reticles. So that just doesn't sound good. I would just return or exchange for a Vortex FFP if possible.
 

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