Reloading

hunter66

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Joined
Aug 15, 2012
Messages
16
Location
Kerman, CA
My son just bought a 300 Win Mag and wants me to load for him. He has H-1000 powder and 178 Eldx bullets. Has extended magazine so can load to 3.56 long. Since components are so hard to come by just would like to know what the best jump would be for that caliber so I don’t have to burn up a bunch of ammo. Read in a previous post the 300 WM like a big jump but mostly because mags only allow 3.34 OAL. Any thoughts?
 

hunter66

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Joined
Aug 15, 2012
Messages
16
Location
Kerman, CA
Every single bullet, powder, rifle combo is different if your after .5 moa i suggest you test it for yourself.
The rifle may not even like H1000
You are correct that every rifle may like or dislike certain powders or bullets. It’s really tough these days when can’t go down to your local retailer and get what ever components you would like. Is there any good data on jump on the 300 WM?
 

QuietTexan

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Nov 16, 2020
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517
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Texas
Writing this based on you imposing the limitation of it's hard to get things so a trade off of less absolute accuracy is acceptable as long as it does what you need it to do - so not my normal advice, but hopefully helpful to your situation.

Set the accuracy goal - what are you trying to kill and at how far? I'd wager 90%+ of whiteails killed every year in this country need no more than 6" at 400 yards of accuracy. 80%+ probably don't need more than 6" at 200 yards. If you goal is 6" at 400 yards or less precise:

Seat to book COL. Factory ammo generally works acceptably for a reason, book COL is not an entirely made up number but is based on a lot of averages coming together. Run an OCW ladder. Don't even chrony it. Load at the vertical node, if the horizontal dispersion is less than the vertical dispersion then shoot it at your max killing range - if it falls into the vital circle then load 10-20 rounds for the season and call them good. It'll be an average load that works about as good as anything else.

If horizontal is greater than the vertical then do a couple longer seating depths, maybe +.05" for a couple sets to see if the shape changes. Maybe stick in a second primer if you have them at the original seating depth and see if it changes shape. Once the width is less than the height, shoot it at the max range and call it good if it works.

At that point the goal has been met - mess with the rest of the components to your heart's content on shaking out seating depth, but you'll have a functional load when the time comes so you won't miss out on anything when the season starts. And if you want to, you can always pull and reseat those rounds later. This is where the pretty common bit of "start at 0.050" off the lands" would come in as a "hey there's probably a seating depth node around here somewhere" piece of advice, but with the component limitation and shooting a bullet where manufacturer COL data exists, I'm not sure I'd start at 0.050" off over book COL because again, averages are average for a reason.

If my premise is flawed and you do need tack driving precision, ignore everything I said ;)
 
Last edited:

hunter66

Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2012
Messages
16
Location
Kerman, CA
Writing this based on you imposing the limitation of it's hard to get things so a trade off of less absolute accuracy is acceptable as long as it does what you need it to do - so not my normal advice, but hopefully helpful to your situation.

Set the accuracy goal - what are you trying to kill and at how far? I'd wager 90%+ of whiteails killed every year in this country need no more than 6" at 400 yards of accuracy. 80%+ probably don't need more than 6" at 200 yards. If you goal is 6" at 400 yards or less precise:

Seat to book COL. Factory ammo generally works acceptably for a reason, book COL is not an entirely made up number but is based on a lot of averages coming together. Run an OCW ladder. Don't even chrony it. Load at the vertical node, if the horizontal dispersion is less than the vertical dispersion then shoot it at your max killing range - if it falls into the vital circle then load 10-20 rounds for the season and call them good. It'll be an average load that works about as good as anything else.

If horizontal is greater than the vertical then do a couple longer seating depths, maybe +.05" for a couple sets to see if the shape changes. Maybe stick in a second primer if you have them at the original seating depth and see if it changes shape. Once the width is less than the height, shoot it at the max range and call it good if it works.

At that point the goal has been met - mess with the rest of the components to your heart's content on shaking out seating depth, but you'll have a functional load when the time comes so you won't miss out on anything when the season starts. And if you want to, you can always pull and reseat those rounds later. This is where the pretty common bit of "start at 0.050" off the lands" would come in as a "hey there's probably a seating depth node around here somewhere" piece of advice, but with the component limitation and shooting a bullet where manufacturer COL data exists, I'm not sure I'd start at 0.050" off over book COL because again, averages are average for a reason.

If my premise is flawed and you do need tack driving precision, ignore everything I said ;)
Thanks for the advice. I am usually anal about very tight groups but with limited components I’m going to have to relax my expectations. Seems like I remember a post a couple of years ago that said a 300 WM likes a long jump.
 

Tiny Tim

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Joined
Jan 26, 2015
Messages
945
Amount of jump has nothing to do with cartridge. It has everything to do with bullet profile and throat interface. That's overly simplistic but good enough for this discussion.
 

fmuguira

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Nov 6, 2010
Messages
576
I d load 3 shots at .020-.030 off your throat ASSUMING magazine allows and shoot them carefully and with a good rest. Nothing good then go .050 off with 3, etc. basically the Berger method. By the time you reach .110 off you should see a depth that looks best. Then work .010 longer and .010 shorter than this depth and see if things tighten a little more. This should result in fairly minimal component use.
 

huntinghuasna

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Messages
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Huasna, Ca.
I d load 3 shots at .020-.030 off your throat ASSUMING magazine allows and shoot them carefully and with a good rest. Nothing good then go .050 off with 3, etc. basically the Berger method. By the time you reach .110
For your situation go with QuietTexan.

If you go with fmuguire's suggestion I'd recommend loading all the lengths to save multiple trips to the range. Once at the range shoot your shortest rounds first working your way to the longest. If you find a node you can shorten the remaining ammo.

 

Buckys

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Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
220
Location
Allen, Tejas
Writing this based on you imposing the limitation of it's hard to get things so a trade off of less absolute accuracy is acceptable as long as it does what you need it to do - so not my normal advice, but hopefully helpful to your situation.

Set the accuracy goal - what are you trying to kill and at how far? I'd wager 90%+ of whiteails killed every year in this country need no more than 6" at 400 yards of accuracy. 80%+ probably don't need more than 6" at 200 yards. If you goal is 6" at 400 yards or less precise:

Seat to book COL. Factory ammo generally works acceptably for a reason, book COL is not an entirely made up number but is based on a lot of averages coming together. Run an OCW ladder. Don't even chrony it. Load at the vertical node, if the horizontal dispersion is less than the vertical dispersion then shoot it at your max killing range - if it falls into the vital circle then load 10-20 rounds for the season and call them good. It'll be an average load that works about as good as anything else.

If horizontal is greater than the vertical then do a couple longer seating depths, maybe +.05" for a couple sets to see if the shape changes. Maybe stick in a second primer if you have them at the original seating depth and see if it changes shape. Once the width is less than the height, shoot it at the max range and call it good if it works.

At that point the goal has been met - mess with the rest of the components to your heart's content on shaking out seating depth, but you'll have a functional load when the time comes so you won't miss out on anything when the season starts. And if you want to, you can always pull and reseat those rounds later. This is where the pretty common bit of "start at 0.050" off the lands" would come in as a "hey there's probably a seating depth node around here somewhere" piece of advice, but with the component limitation and shooting a bullet where manufacturer COL data exists, I'm not sure I'd start at 0.050" off over book COL because again, averages are average for a reason.

If my premise is flawed and you do need tack driving precision, ignore everything I said ;)

Does anyone know where to find the original OCW information?
The link that I have/keep finding is dead : http://optimalchargeweight.embarqspace.com/
 

QuietTexan

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Joined
Nov 16, 2020
Messages
517
Location
Texas
Not sure about the original, but Cal Zandt and 6.5 Guys each have info about the concept. Newberry, Satterlee, and Audette all get at the same thing, kinda.

 

fmuguira

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Joined
Nov 6, 2010
Messages
576
tapatalk.com/groups/practicalriflerfr/practical-riflery-what-it-is-what-it-isn-t-t1075.html

This is the address showing on my computer when I m on Dan Newberry s page
 
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