Reloading/work bench ideas

AZShooter

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Dec 12, 2005
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Tucson Az
Regarding the turret press. Each turret has 7 places for dies

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Extra turrets are approx 80 dollars
1593641757746.png

 

26Reload

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Dec 25, 2016
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SE Idaho
For those that don't think lead poisoning is harmful...
You could look like this.....https://images.app.goo.gl/kkb2BFAX1ppX4kwdA

"This image is only offensive...if you vote democrat"
 
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CVCOBRA1

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Sep 20, 2014
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703
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Illinois
I am not about to copy and paste the link you posted. And yet I am not about to say lead poisoning is a trivial matter. The OP is worried about reloading ammo in his domicile. Californication does not ring any bells with me. Those out there have no clue what so ever. Their laws should never come my direction. You can't buy anything without their "lead" warning. Sorry for you guys on here from the Commie state, but your shirt on the street in San Fran belongs to Piglosi.
 
Joined
Mar 18, 2009
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When I set up my reloading and gun hobby room, I already had 45-year old Rosewood Desk for my books, manuals, and study materials. After a bit of looking, I bought a Husky work bench at Home Depot. Comes with a pegboard back and shelf, two drawers and two good sized shelves for my die sets and supplies. The bench cost $198 a few years ago.

As I use RCBS equipment, I got three of their mounting plates, one at each front corner for my Rock Chucker and Turret Presses, and one in the front middle for mounting my case trimmer and powder thrower. I have plenty of work space, and can move all my equipment with the turn of a few screws when I need to use the bench for gunsmithing. It's big enough for my Dremel Workstation and tool kits that I use for smith work, stock bedding, scope mounting and pistol cleaning. The bench comes with an aluminum top so it's easy to clean.

As to storage of powders, primers, and brass I use plastic tubs that stack neatly, also from Home Depot.

Good luck with your choices.

Harry
 

ntsqd

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Nov 16, 2015
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Upper SoKA
I would also caution against combining reloading with any other uses. I bought a Tuff Shed specifically for the grinding and abrasive cleaning tools. Keep all of that grit out of the shop! Once airborne you really have no idea how far abrasive grit can travel and I can tell you that it is a LOT further than you'd think.

I bought a maple topped work bench from Uline specifically for my reloading bench. Can check the options boxes until your wallet cries for mercy. I considered using the work-worker's T-slot insert in the table top to mount the press, but ultimately decided to go with Inline Fab's system instead. I bought a plate specific to my press and a blank plate with the intention of putting a small vise on it.
 

jrock

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Mar 12, 2014
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I don't want to reload in the garage because it gets cold in the winter and hot in the summer. It would be an utter mess with my reloading gear in there. I have to cover the, lathe, mill, and car from all the particulates from one thing or another.
I like a bench long enough to work on my guns as well. 60" would be a good length. Make the table top very thick so it doesn't deflect when you operate the press. I'd recommend several layers of 3/4" plywood glued together or better yet, laminated 2x4s. I use 3/8" threaded rod to bolt the press to the table.
For height, are you going to be working standing or sitting? I sit and I think I put my table at 34" to get it up a bit higher to operate the press handle. Try some heights out before you build to see what suits you best. Home Depot has some work tables that can move up and down and are laminated 2x material. They look awesome and are about $200 or so.
 

ntsqd

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Upper SoKA
My bench is 60" and with a wall on one end and a shoulder high filing cabinet on the other it isn't quite long enough for comfortable cleaning of the longer barreled rifles. If I'd had the room I'd have gone with a 72" at the least. If the ends in the OP's spot are open that should help a lot.

EDIT: I mostly sit, on a bar stool.
 
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ofbandg

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Jul 26, 2015
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181
I have space restrictions as well so my loading bench is only about four feet long. I built it about 35 years ago using a 10x10 timber I cut in half and covered with 3/4 plywood. It's anchored to a cement wall in my basement so nothing moves. The first thing I put on the bench was a large, strong vise. Then I bolted my press and powder measure and trimmer to short pieces of 2x4's. Now whenever I am reloading I lift the tool I need into the jaws of the vise and clamp it on the wood and when I'm done with it I put it back on the shelf. This system has worked well for me for all these years and I load for over twenty calibers.
 

Ol' Red

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Nov 28, 2018
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Wyoming
You could do a combo bench. But my garage work involves things that are not safe around reloading components such as powder and primers. And it's nice to go to the reloading bench and just get started. I have been reloading in the house for years, including lead for shotgun shells and have no elevated lead levels. House climate is easier to control for powder and primer storage at my house. Just things to consider. Enjoy your reloading.
 

erle

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Nov 7, 2015
Messages
10
If you can do your reloading inside the house then I would definitely set up a reloading bench inside. If it would make you feel better, you could store your lead bullets in the garage cabinets if you should ever have any for your pistols. I use only jacketed bullets and don't worry about it. I have been reloading inside my house 60 years. Reloaded 225 .223 and 210 9mm just yesterday.

I would definitely recommend getting the Inline equipment with removeable mounting plates.
 

H59

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Mar 13, 2018
Messages
100
Location
Alabama
definitely reload indoors, store components inside as well. These products are very safe unless you have a large fire in the room. Your powder if stored outside simply by setting the jugs on a shelf will absolutely suffer from humidity and temperature changes which would make weighing inconsistent at the least from the powder grains just sitting out in a scale overnight in an air conditioned house the powder either absorbs humidity from the air & becomes heavier,or more often dries out & then you have more powder loaded than you should b/c it weighs less per grain. Even keeping them in Rubbermaid containers outside doesn't help much. I'm in a very humid environment, you might not be.
Reloading dies also can very easily become rusted. If your doing any other kinds of work in that area,you certainly wouldn't want any sawdust in the air getting grit on an into them.
I absolutely agree with a taller workstation that you stand at while reloading. Your always moving around while Reloading and if you do sit while you're doing prep work or something of that nature then setup a separate area for those types of work, but standing is the only way I can do the actual powder weighing, bullet seating process. I reload nearly every day. Usually for precision rifle but, also revolvers, pistols, ar's, lever guns...if you're using a drop tube instead of a scale it's much easier to be standing while going through that whole process with brass in trays& getting bullets out to be seated etc. ...of course only one opinion & you know what they say about opinions...like @#$%* everybody's got one! Good luck! Have fun-be safe...
 

hunter0528

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Oct 31, 2012
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150
Location
boston,ma
2 years ago i redid my bench. I got 2 pieces of steel plat 18"x36" 3/8" thick. I then went and marked out each of my presses (RCBS, Dillon 1050, Dillon 550), Powder Measure, Priming tool, and a Star Sizer. I then drilled and taped each hole so I can bolt what ever units I am using at the time. All the holes are filled with socket cap screws to keep junk out of them. The plate was mounted from under the table and the portion of the bolts that protruded I ground flush. I then removed the Plates and painted them with 3 coats of Flat Black (only one I had at the time :) ). Now I do not have a bench with umpteen holes for stuff or parts to fall into .
 

misterc01

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Feb 15, 2019
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374
Location
Florida Panhandle
I custom-made my own bench that had to fit in very specific place. It is 37'H x 42'W x 24' D. It has shelves on top, 8'W X 42'W X4 0'H with adjustable shelves I can add, remove or vary the height of them. Below the bench top, I have drawers and shelves. It is built with 4X4 legs on the corners, 1 1/2" plywood top with 2x4 braces underneath. a Polycoat sealer and almost immovable. The really nice part - I had some Lowes gift cards, so it cost me $0.00. I permanently mounted a Rock Chucker Supreme on one end, and have a removable Turret press I can clamp my on the top to take on/off for mass reloading - Pistol, etc. Holds everything I need while I am reloading and just keep primer and powder I am using on the bench. On the walls I have wire shelving to store "stuff." Tumbler is in the garage on a Sam's Club workbench I got on sale for $100.00 with those supplies, etc.
 
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