Reloading beginner equipment checklist help

CleanShot

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Bergen County, NJ
Hello

You guys convinced me to start reloading so I went ahead and order a Rock Chucker Supreme Kit. I'm now trying to figure out what else I need to effectively reload. Figure I'm starting with nothing but a rifle and scope with some targets.

Here's what I have:
  • Rock Chucker Supreme single stage press
  • 505 Mechanical Scale
  • Uniflow Powder Measure
  • Hand Priming Tool
  • Universal Case Loading Block
  • .17-.60 Dchamfer/Debur Tool
  • Hex Wrench Set
  • Case Lube-2
  • Case Lube Pad
  • Accy Handle-2
  • Small and Medium Case Neck Brushes
  • Powder Funnel
  • Speer Reloading Manual
  • Powder
  • Primers
  • Bullets
  • RCBS full length dies

Here's what I think I need:
  • Caldwell Lead Sled DFT (should I go cheaper?)
  • Sinclair Ultimate Trimmer (should I go cheaper?)
  • Calipers
  • Ammo boxes
  • Flash hole deburring tool

Here's what I think I don't need:
  • New brass (just going to save brass from factory ammo)
  • Headspace gauge
  • Chronograph
  • Digital scale
  • Any other toys

I'm not going to shoot competitively. I'm just looking to get started and to give myself accuracy beyond what I can get using factory ammo. I'm also trying not to overspend until I know what I need so figure I'm going for "minimum effective dose" of equipment.

Thanks
Sam
 

Dosh

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Sam, good list, perhaps a case cleaner of some type "vibrating media, ultrasonic, stainless wet tumbler". Definitely a good dial caliper. Good luck
 

gohring3006

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I agree with Dosh, clean cases are easier to inspect. After the accuracy bug bites you you will want a chrony to measure ES. But that will come later, you really need a bullet puller of some sort. You will mess up and need to pull some bullets.
 

CleanShot

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Thanks for the reply gents. I was about to actually ask if a cleaner was needed. I was looking at the Frankford Arsenal Rotary Tumbler. But all this wet vs dry cleaning stuff just makes me overthink it. I'm not sure if I can get away with a cheaper cleaner or if that's the way to go.
 

claybreaker

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Mar 22, 2013
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E. TN
In addition to the above suggestions I would strongly recommend about at least two good reloading books/manuals. The one's that give and show good details of each step.

I would also seek out a "mentor" to help coach you and be someone you can ask questions of.

Be patience and be safe,
 

el matador

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Jul 30, 2008
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647
Pretty good list. I've never regretted buying really good stuff, such as the Sinclair case trimmer. I actually have one! I'm not a fan of the lead sled, I prefer a good front rest and a rear bag. I use the Caldwell BR front rest and a Protektor rabbit ear bag for the rear.

For precision rifle reloading there are a ton of little things you can do to improve consistency...neck turning, weight sorting brass, flash hole uniform/debur, neck size, etc. Everyone will agree that a consistent powder charge is very important. For that you will want to weigh each individual powder charge instead of just setting your powder measure and throwing all the charges. The best way to do that (without an expensive powder dispenser) is to get a hand trickler and "trickle up". You throw a charge out of your measure that's slightly under what you want and then use the trickler and a beam scale to get it right on the money.

Reloading is fun, but be careful. It's habit forming.
 

CleanShot

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Bergen County, NJ
I should mention I did get the RCBS trickler. Is there any need for a primer uniformer tool or neck sizing dies?

ABCs of Reloading sounds like required reading. I'll try to get that as well.
 

rcoody

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Jul 1, 2015
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Pretty good list. I've never regretted buying really good stuff, such as the Sinclair case trimmer. I actually have one! I'm not a fan of the lead sled, I prefer a good front rest and a rear bag. I use the Caldwell BR front rest and a Protektor rabbit ear bag for the rear.

For precision rifle reloading there are a ton of little things you can do to improve consistency...neck turning, weight sorting brass, flash hole uniform/debur, neck size, etc. Everyone will agree that a consistent powder charge is very important. For that you will want to weigh each individual powder charge instead of just setting your powder measure and throwing all the charges. The best way to do that (without an expensive powder dispenser) is to get a hand trickler and "trickle up". You throw a charge out of your measure that's slightly under what you want and then use the trickler and a beam scale to get it right on the money.

Reloading is fun, but be careful. It's habit forming.

I would skip the lead sled and get a good rest and rear bag. Lead sled is good for load development with heavy recoiling guns but is not for day to day range sessions. Even your sight in will be slightly different between the lead sled and holding the gun.

Looks like you have done your research. Good start. Let the journey begin.
 

CleanShot

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I would skip the lead sled and get a good rest and rear bag. Lead sled is good for load development with heavy recoiling guns but is not for day to day range sessions. Even your sight in will be slightly different between the lead sled and holding the gun.

Looks like you have done your research. Good start. Let the journey begin.

Load development and my Savage 220 slug gun (hate the recoils on that thing) are the two reasons I had for the sled. I have the Caldwell Deadshot Shooting Bag Combo. Stuffed them with walnut hulls. If that's sufficient I won't bother with the led sled.
 

roninflag

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az
i do not de burr the flash holes. studies in precision shooting magazine found it detrimental. i would get a primer pocket uniformer to clean primer pockets. i would not use a lead sled for any accuracy type shooting unless it was for a 378 weatherby. i would get a tumbler and walnutt shells.what caliber and rifle?
 

CleanShot

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Aug 6, 2013
Messages
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Location
Bergen County, NJ
i do not de burr the flash holes. studies in precision shooting magazine found it detrimental. i would get a primer pocket uniformer to clean primer pockets. i would not use a lead sled for any accuracy type shooting unless it was for a 378 weatherby. i would get a tumbler and walnutt shells.what caliber and rifle?

Interesting. I read Chuck Hawk and few other articles and decided on the Flashhole deburring. Maybe I'll put that aside.

I'm reloading a 243 Win and 7RM.
 

roninflag

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lapua .243 . nosler 7mm mag. the only thing you will do is make it worse. chamfer the cases necks lightly and call it good.
 

7magcreedmoor

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Lebanon County PA
Put the headspace bump guage on the do need list, along with a set of competition shellholders to go with it. Stainless steel wet tumbling is very good for brass cleaning.
 
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