Reloading Accuracy

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by WYcoyote, May 3, 2014.

  1. WYcoyote

    WYcoyote Well-Known Member

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    I use fairly standard reloading practices. I resize new brass, chamfer the case mouth inside (VLD) and out, and go with them. Used to uniform the primer pockets but stopped doing it. I use Forster or Redding dies. Not competition type.
    I weigh each charge and set OAL with a comparator. Three of my rifles are dependant on magazine length for land set-back. A couple others let me get to the lands.
    I do not sort brass or bullets. nor do I mess with anything to do with neck tension, like use bushing dies, neck turning etc. No dial indicator/ runout checks.

    My question. Does anyone else get acceptable LR hunting accuracy using these standards?
    Or do I absolutely have to up the ante with my efforts?

    I know this is subjective but I'm throwing it out for discussion anyway.
     
  2. DocDoc

    DocDoc Well-Known Member

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    What level of accuracy are you getting with your present program? What distance are you planning to shoot at and what level will be needed? Answer those and that should tell you whether you need more time reloading or more time shooting.
     
  3. ericbc7

    ericbc7 Active Member

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    I hear what your saying, but i would love to hear what your cartridge runnout is. What i think is : if your floating, your runnout is probably good. I got a pacific o7 press and loaded many hundreds of rounds with no complaint. that said i just bought a forster co-Ax and bet that i make better ammo with that. I have a sinclair comparitor now, and plan to get a headspace comparitor soon. I am an Engineer and love to be able to measure things so now got a mitutoyo caliper and micrometer. I cant imagine how off my old loads were in retrospect... from now on they are gonna be tight!!
     
  4. ericbc7

    ericbc7 Active Member

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    my first introduction to reloading was making some .222 rem loads with a "C" type press, my instruction was to turn the die down to "hard contact" with the ram and if the case was full it was too full of imr 3031. i now know how stupid that was but the simple powder measure was not too accurate. Sigh i wish i could go back and develop that load for the savage rifle i was using...the extractor was broken and I had to punch out each with a rod. so primitive.
     
  5. gilmillan1

    gilmillan1 Well-Known Member

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    The first to do is to test what you have right now. Try it out. See what groups you get at your available distances. Remember that reloading and long range shooting is all about consistency. See how consistent with your load is. After you do that, you need to decide whether you want to go the extra mile to get better accuracy. If you do, then you need to get into advanced reloading. If you are only hunting at 500 yards then you may have enough. But if you are shooting at farther distances, you probably need a better load.
     
  6. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    You're hoping someone will tell you that extra efforts aren't needed. Otherwise you wouldn't ask.
    But this is a long range hunting forum,, c'mon..
     
  7. WYcoyote

    WYcoyote Well-Known Member

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  8. DocB

    DocB Well-Known Member

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    +1

    Basically it comes down to 'are you happy with your accuracy and level of precision'?

    If you are, continue with your routine. No need to fix what ain't broke.

    If you aren't, and you feel that your marksmanship skills are adequate enough to place your rounds into consistent sub-moa groups at the ranges you shoot, then perhaps you might wish to re-look your reloading routine and see if it could be tweaked in order to attain the precision and consistency level you desire.

    Unless you are shooting paper, long range is about cold bore one shot, one ethical kill. Everything about long range should be focused on that one shot i.e., training, ballistics, equipment, reloading technique.

    DocB
     
  9. Bullet bumper

    Bullet bumper Well-Known Member

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    It's a very subjective thing. Reloading is only part of the whole accuracy potential of the combination of the man , gun and ammo .
    Many things have to happen right .
    You could bust your guts to load the finest ammo on the planet but the rifle may be very inaccurate of its self. The rifle could be fantastic but the scope could be rubbish and don't track well or hold zero perfect .
    The ammo could be perfect , the gun could be perfect the scope could be perfect but the shooter can't steer the gun .
    The variables are so numerous that it is a miracle of engineering we can hit anything with any gun but we do .
    If you are happy with what you are getting then peace be with you . A lot of enjoyment can be lost fretting about bug hole groups that we may never need .
    Having said that it never hurts to try new things as you never know what will be a real help to accuracy until you try it .
    Sometimes you have to do many small things to achieve some results but if you only do one thing of the number nothing much changes .
    Tuning loads and guns is just like that . It's a holistic approach .
     
  10. Damascus

    Damascus Well-Known Member

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    Lots of good advice here.
    Another thing to consider is - what components are you now using?? What I'm getting at is; lets say one shooter is loading some ammo using Lapua brass and match grade primers, but another shooter is using commercial grade Win or Rem brass along with some Russian-made bulk buy primers, but both are using the same rifle, the same bullet, and the same powder charge... I think it's safe to say the fellow loading with the Lapua brass (premium components) is going to have a much more accurate load, i.e., more consistent load.
    Like mentioned before, record some group sizes with your current load. Next, load some rounds with precision techniques, such as, weighing and sorting brass and bullets, reaming the flash holes, uniforming primer pockets, adjusting your sizing die in order to minimally size the case and better match your chamber (or neck size only), and turn the case necks.
    In my .308 target rifles, I also do not use bushing dies or fool with neck tension, that being said, I do turn my case necks to ensure even tension, as well as uniforming pockets, reaming flash hole, and sizing cases to optimally fit my chamber.. I always expect under half MOA accuracy from these loads, and theres still a few other chores I could add to theoretically tighten the groups even more..
     
  11. martyj

    martyj Well-Known Member

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    Use the best brass you can find it lasts longer and is more accurate than some of the junk that is available.

    I figured this out the hard way and is true especially on my 300 win mags.
    Ive always used Weatherby brass in my 7 mags and they always produced good results.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2014
  12. WYcoyote

    WYcoyote Well-Known Member

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    martyj,
    What brand of brass did you have the best luck with in your .300 Win Mags?
     
  13. Damascus

    Damascus Well-Known Member

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    Speaking of quality brass, the few rounds that I am truly thorough in loading, for long range shooting; .308, 6.5 Grendel, 6.5/284, .300 Win Mag, .338 Lapua, I have been having outstanding luck with Nosler Custom brass.. Not quite as good as Lapua brass, but much cheaper, and better than Hornady. Never tried Norma.
     
  14. martyj

    martyj Well-Known Member

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    I like Norma the best because it seems like the primer pockets hold up better than Nosler. I also like Remington but have to put in more effort into case prep than you do the others. Just dont buy the bargain crap head stamped PPU.
    I always check group size at 200 and 300 yards and never even bother with the 100 on that cartridge.