RELOADED .270 STICK AND CAN NOT CLOSE BOLT SAKO RIFLE

WyoHunter1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2015
Messages
221
If he is reloading cases that came out of a rifle then they should go back in whether or not he FL sized. He can try seating the bullets a little to see if that might be the issue.de
I understand what you are saying but i have full length sized brass on my 300 WBY and had some that wouldnt chamber when I was done that came out of the same gun. Pulled bullets and set the shoulder back a bit further then there was no issue,
Dont know why.
 

Rick Richard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2014
Messages
4,528
Location
North Carolina
If he is reloading cases that came out of a rifle then they should go back in whether or not he FL sized. He can try seating the bullets a little to see if that might be the issue.
Uh disagree. I have many times taken fired brass from a certain rifle, FL resize it without attention to shoulder bump and would not chamber or difficult to chamber needing excessive bolt close.
 

antelopedundee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2018
Messages
1,349
Location
Iowa
Uh disagree. I have many times taken fired brass from a certain rifle, FL resize it without attention to shoulder bump and would not chamber or difficult to chamber needing excessive bolt close.
OTOH I've never had one not go back into the chamber that fired it.
 

Rick Richard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2014
Messages
4,528
Location
North Carolina
Cept I don't FL size each time. Never had a round not chamber after reloading that I can remember.
This condition is more apt to happen when FL resizing and not so much when Neck sizing.

Also, you may be bumping the shoulder enough when you set your die up that you are not seeing the issue he has.
 

ChiefStone

Active Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2021
Messages
29
Location
SE
Lyman makes a case gauge that is similar to what was mentioned by rammac.
They are in stock at several retailers and are slightly more affordable.
A headspace or case gauge will save you from getting all the way to loaded rounds that won’t chamber... The Lyman versions are machined to minimum SAAMI specs, so after you resize your brass, drop it in the case checker and make sure the rim of the cartridge is sitting flush or slightly below. If so, it should chamber in any SAAMI spec barrel.

 

Muddyboots

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
3,779
Location
Michigan
So OP help us to help you:
  1. Is the brass new? Doesn't sound like it if you cleaned it.
  2. Is the brass from this rifle or from another rifle? If from another rifle or you bought x-fired brass from someone the brass has to be resized such the shoulder is pushed back at least 0.003 and then do test feed to see if it will cycle in YOUR rifle.
  3. Even if from your rifle, set back the shoulder 0.003 and test feed the brass to insure you are adequately headspacing the load.
  4. How many firings on this brass? Maybe the web has expanded from hot loads and now the brass will not feed or cycle. We all have been there at one time or another.
  5. Hornady or Sinclair comparator will certainly help you see the shoulder push back easier as well as to establish bullet jump to reasonable extent.
  6. Consider Redding Competition shellholders that truly help control shoulder setback by their machining of 0.002 off for each shellholder you can pick. This really takes the measurement voodoo out of twisting the FL die for you.
  7. If you do not have the experience of loading near the lands, DON'T! Bad things can happen really fast if you do not realize the thin ice you are standing on. Most hunting rigs (not LR rigs per se) seat 0.020 Cartridge Base to Ogive (CBTO) off to be certain the round will feed reliably under most field conditions. That distance is a campfire discussion as well but learn the seating first.
 

Muddyboots

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
3,779
Location
Michigan
I just reread the OP post and wonder when you state the brass length is OK, we are all talking about the shoulder set back NOT the total length of the brass. The shoulder setback is the critical dimension that allows a rifle to cycle/feed correctly not so much the total length unless way out of bounds.
 

antelopedundee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2018
Messages
1,349
Location
Iowa
I just reread the OP post and wonder when you state the brass length is OK, we are all talking about the shoulder set back NOT the total length of the brass. The shoulder setback is the critical dimension that allows a rifle to cycle/feed correctly not so much the total length unless way out of bounds.

Assuming once-fired the cases should not be over maximum allowed length.
 

antelopedundee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2018
Messages
1,349
Location
Iowa
I used a unfired winchester 130 grain bullet to set the rcbs die I also cleaned all brass in a oak shell tumbler .
Using one brand of bullet is not the best way to adjust your seating die since the seat plug may not necessarily contact the bullet in the same spot for different bullets.

Assuming that you're using a standard size die setup first make sure that your resized case will chamber in your gun. Take that unsized case and seat a bullet such that you know it's too long. Try to chamber it. If it doesn't chamber with light effort do not force it or your bullet will stick in the lands when you try to extract the dummy round. Put the dummy back into the seater die and turn the seater stem down maybe a quarter turn. Try to chamber the dummy round again. If no go then keep turning the stem down until it does. When it does chamber you could set that aside as sort of a dummy round where the bullet approximately touches the lands. Could come in handy if you need to reset your seat die some time in the future. You can experiment with seat depth by turning the stem in in small amounts. Be sure that the round is still up in the die before you tighten the seater stem lock ring. Good luck and good shooting.
 

Muddyboots

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
3,779
Location
Michigan
Assuming once-fired the cases should not be over maximum allowed length.
i think the OP is talking about total brass length where I am talking about headspace of shoulder. We don't know what he is talking about. Once fired if out of different rifle another issue we do not know. We know nothing only can guess that provides nothing.
 

antelopedundee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2018
Messages
1,349
Location
Iowa
i think the OP is talking about total brass length where I am talking about headspace of shoulder. We don't know what he is talking about. Once fired if out of different rifle another issue we do not know. We know nothing only can guess that provides nothing.


It's hard to imagine that a once-fired [if that's what the OP was using] case would be even close to maximum allowed length. Then again we don't really know what "cases were checked for length" means since the OP didn't elaborate more.
 

Recent Posts

Top