Recoil Management Part 1

Teri Anne

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
May 24, 2021
Messages
266
Location
Wisconsin
One of the major topics of discussion here seems to be the weight as well as recoil of a given rifle. Both are variables that are pretty much controlled by the individual gun owner. What rifle you buy or build, how much it weighs, what cartridge you choose to chamber it in all affects how much recoil that the rifle will have. Out of the box rifles can weigh anywhere between, let's say for giggles...6 pounds to 12 pounds or more. Those rifles are available in any number of calibers from light recoiling like the .223/5.56 on up to heavy recoiling like many of the magnum loads, which are way to numerous to list here. So how do we determine what rifle to buy or build? Are we buying something practical for it's intended use or simply something to appease the ego or maybe even show off a bit. Is the rifle going to be used for hunting, or is it going to be used for long range shooting? Most people do not like hauling a heavy rifle around through the mountains, woods and fields that we hunt in, especially in the mountains. If one is only interested in long range shooting then the weight of the rifle really doesn't matter all that much since it will only be carried from the car or truck to the range and back. If hunting the type of animal that you are going to be hunting will be a big factor in determining the caliber chosen. It seems that there is a big push on called magnum mania. Thoughts are that if it's not a magnum then it's not an efficient hunting (or for that matter target) rifle. In real life magnum cartridges have a disproportional balance between recoil, range and killing power as opposed to standard calibers which may in fact be a better choice over a magnum. Another factor to be considered is the usual and maximum distance you will be hunting. Most hunters will probably shoot at an absolute maximum of 300 to 500 yards. At those ranges standard rifle cartridges like the .270, .308 and 30-06 have been reliably killing all forms of North American (as well as other spots around the globe) game up to and including Big Bears without issue. So if you are not going to hunt elephants why use an elephant gun? OK, I've beat that topic to death although there is much more to be said, I'm going to stop here. More on the topic of recoil management, getting more into methods of managing recoil will be discussed in Part 2.
 

nealm66

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Joined
Jul 6, 2020
Messages
780
Location
washington
One thing I see is crossover target/hunting calibers where spotting impacts vs recoil is a priority. I see a lot of guys at the range practicing without a light hold down on the front of the stock with a bipod and it makes me appreciate the days when nothing had a brake and velocity was your range finder
 

snox801

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Joined
Sep 19, 2012
Messages
4,012
Location
Spring Lake Michigan
I think you answered your own questions. I know I shoot my large caliber for a wow factor. That being said I use a 6.5 grendel or 300blk for 90 percent of my hunting keeping in mind distance and maximum effective range of those rounds. Now I also have a few big magnums that weight very little and use a very good muzzle break. That both keeps weight done but extends my range on game a good amount. Every job has a correct tool.
Look at hammers you can buy little ones or big ones. They will all drive nails it’s just some are better for framing and some better for finish nails.
 

sp6x6

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Messages
4,715
Location
NW MT
I shoot a light large mag.Its not for everyone.It suits me,theres tricks to shooting it for target practice,and also for field use.commanding it more,sucked in tighter,to spot your own hits.You just loosey goosy it,and it might give you a kiss
 

Rich Coyle

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2013
Messages
4,797
Location
Grants Pass, Oregon
I am a "loosey goosy" shooter. My rifle is a Mark V Weatherby ultralight six lug with a light barrel. It weighs a little over seven pounds. The cartridge is like a .338 Win Mag necked to 8mm. I use Hammer Hunter 198 grain bullets at an average velocity of 3, 054 feet per second. I hold it like a BB gun. The brake is about 7/8" diameter. The five port are slightly angled so the muzzle rise is minimized. It is so effective I can see hits through the scope even at 100 yards.
 

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