Real Hunters?

Mike Matteson

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Jun 26, 2017
Messages
1,271
I do my hunting on my own with friends for kids. I have been on one drop camp here in the USA and no guide here in the US ever. It's one thing to hunt on your own, but going out of county is a different thing. Alaska You have to have a guide or hunt with a loco. So I don't know what's the big deal on using a guide. If yo don't own horses in the US, you can't get very far away from other people. Some of Wyoming there areas that you can't hunt being an out of state person. I've done backpack hunting in my day also. So I don't see the Big Deal on I without any guide or help.
 

Argon Glen

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Feb 6, 2018
Messages
47
A hunter in my opinion is a person that kills to have hunted.
Hunting means one knows everything about his quarry.
Knows its habits, paterns,where it lives and travels.
The hunter than plans and sets up a rendezvous and than hopefully if he is a competent marksman finishes the hunt.

So again no disrespect for people with a limited time frame,disabilities,traveling to far of locations etc.
These people must rely on outfiters and guides to do to a great extent the hunting for them and they become the shooters.

People hunting the fringes of parks,roadhunters ( with the exception of antelope ) game reserves and sanctuaries also don't qualify.
And neither do drones, heat seekers, fish finders. lol

So how many of us are really a full fledged hunters?

Based on your definition one could hunt for a long time before being a hunter. The reason is because when starting out one [very likely] doesn't necessarily know everything about the quarry - habits, patterns, where it lives, where it travels. And do we ever stop learning? Thus never become hunters. Anyway, we'll have to come up with a different term for people in the knowledge development stage.

If one meets your definition why can't they travel to far off locations to hunt?? Why must people traveling "rely on outfiters and guides"? I guess I, as a solo hunter, am doing something wrong. Traveling to hunt is necessary for some poeple. For example, where I live there are no Black Bears. How can I hunt them if I don't travel? Or should I miss out simply because of where I live? Maybe I need to move? But then I may not be able to hunt an animal that is here but not where I move to. Oh man, this is getting complex.

Why do antelope road hunters get an exemption to qualify as hunters?

Aside from me continuing to learn and hone my skills, I feel like I'm a full fledged hunter. Yet maybe I'm really only a poseur. Either way, I'm ok with what I do and how I do it.

I guess I can get on board with your stance on drones so far as it is [il]legal since, I believe, that is illegal for some animals in some places. But "heat seekers"? Do you mean thermal scopes? Those are key for night hunting which is legal for some animals in some areas. If you're a full fledged hunter than you'd know there are animals that are best hunted at night.

Having said all that, are *you* a full fledged hunter?
 

Argon Glen

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Joined
Feb 6, 2018
Messages
47
I do not, judge,condem disagree with anything not the tools not how to not not the weather not the guides or outfiters.

But you did...

People hunting the fringes of parks,roadhunters ( with the exception of antelope ) game reserves and sanctuaries also don't qualify.
And neither do drones, heat seekers, fish finders. lol

Down in Texas people night hunt pigs on properties that have cattle. A rancher would be pretty upset if cattle were mistakenly shot. Thermal and night vision can be necessary to be safe. People also hunt pigs from helicopter. I'm sure you'd agree that's a "tool". But they can be an effective aid toward removing the land and crop damaging animals.
 

Varmint Hunter

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Joined
Dec 26, 2001
Messages
4,312
Location
Long Island, New York
I watched a video where an African tribesman hunted a kudu with nothing more than a spear and a small water bottle. The kudu was easily capable of avoiding the hunter and just trotted away but the hunter was persistent. Mile, after mile, after mile, the hunter gave chase in the boiling hot sun of Africa. Eventually, both the hunter and the hunted were succumbing to shear exhaustion but the pursuit continued. Many, many hours later the kudu dropped from the endless pursuit and the exhausted tribesman caught up to his quarry. With the very last once of strength he could muster the tribesman threw his spear into the chest of the kudu. Game over!

Now that guy fits my description of a "REAL HUNTER".
 
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xsn10s

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Joined
Mar 7, 2016
Messages
2,651
I watched a video where an African tribesman hunted a kudo with nothing more than a spear and a small water bottle. The kudo was easily capable of avoiding the hunter and just trotted away but the hunter was persistent. Mile, after mile, after mile, the hunter gave chase in the boiling hot sun of Africa. Eventually, both the hunter and the hunted were succumbing to shear exhaustion but the pursuit continued. Many, many hours later the kudo dropped from the endless pursuit and the exhausted tribesman caught up to his quarry. With the very last once of strength he could muster the tribesman threw his spear into the chest of the kudo. Game over!

Now that guy fits my description of a "REAL HUNTER".
In my sick mind I thought you would end the story with the hunter beating the kudo with the water bottles. And then falling on the spear so he wouldn't have to drag it back home ;)
 
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Ol' Red

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Joined
Nov 28, 2018
Messages
752
Location
Wyoming
I watched a video where an African tribesman hunted a kudo with nothing more than a spear and a small water bottle. The kudo was easily capable of avoiding the hunter and just trotted away but the hunter was persistent. Mile, after mile, after mile, the hunter gave chase in the boiling hot sun of Africa. Eventually, both the hunter and the hunted were succumbing to shear exhaustion but the pursuit continued. Many, many hours later the kudo dropped from the endless pursuit and the exhausted tribesman caught up to his quarry. With the very last once of strength he could muster the tribesman threw his spear into the chest of the kudo. Game over!

Now that guy fits my description of a "REAL HUNTER".
I have to say that for the last couple years, I have sat on a vantage point and shot my deer when it crossed the ranch road. Then I drove over and loaded it in the truck. I draw the line at feeders. When you start throwing burgers around, I can not concentrate on my trigger squeeze and cheek weld.
 

Bravo 4

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Joined
Jul 20, 2007
Messages
4,070
Location
The South
I watched a video where an African tribesman hunted a kudo with nothing more than a spear and a small water bottle. The kudo was easily capable of avoiding the hunter and just trotted away but the hunter was persistent. Mile, after mile, after mile, the hunter gave chase in the boiling hot sun of Africa. Eventually, both the hunter and the hunted were succumbing to shear exhaustion but the pursuit continued. Many, many hours later the kudo dropped from the endless pursuit and the exhausted tribesman caught up to his quarry. With the very last once of strength he could muster the tribesman threw his spear into the chest of the kudo. Game over!

Now that guy fits my description of a "REAL HUNTER".
Most guys I know couldn’t chase down a cheeseburger! Some are too lazy to even walk the 50 feet to their truck and drive 5 miles to the nearest McD’s. They would rather pay someone to deliver it. I’m just glad God invented smokeless gunpowder and high BC bullets. A few days ago I was testing a load for ELR performance @ 1485, made a 1st round impact that was good on elevation but .5 MOA off on wind. Fired two more that made a .5 MOA group 3 shot group. Gonna stretch it out to a mile tomorrow, gotta get ready for a hunt coming up this weekend.😁
 

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