Range finder plus wind meter

maxrep99

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Nov 12, 2020
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Can anyone recommend a rangefinder + wind meter ? Budget is around $1500. I looked at the Sig Sauer 2400 ABS, but found it is not compatible with a wind meter (I looked at Kestrel 5700). I saw the Sig Sauer 2400 BDX does pair with a Kestrel, but it bothers me using my phone with the 3.5mm jack. I don't want to rely on my phone. Plus, I saw the Sig Sauer 2400 BDX only has ballistic solutions out to 800 yards. I want the ability to get solutions out to 2,000 yards.
1. Is there a way to get windage transmitted to the Sig Sauer 2400 ABS ? If so, from what wind meter ?
2. Or - is the a range finder similar to Sig Sauer 2400 ABS that pairs with a wind meter that does not rely on my phone ? If so, what wind meter ? Thanks in advance !
 

dgarrett

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Dec 2, 2012
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Sig 3000 BDX Bino and Kestrel 5700 AB w/link. Would also work.. Would be a bit over your budget... But would do what you need...
 

C.O. Shooter

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Great combination!
 

frostop

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I am currently running the Sig 3000 BDX Bino and Kestrel 5700 with link(not the AB version) and so far it works great.
I purchased the bino's at cabelas when they were running a trade in option along with a sale and I think I ended up spending $900 and the kestrel was I think in the $300 range https://www.cabelas.com/shop/en/kes...dpcXiDYOoQawK-dhU_4aArVgEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds.

Gives me solutions in the viewfinder. Just have to make sure your kestrel is on before you start ranging things.
 
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AUsome4x4

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Aug 19, 2021
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AZ, USA
Replying to an old thread, but....
Why do I want both a rangefinder w/weather data and a Kestrel?
I thought the rangefinder with weather data would mean one less item (Kestrel) to carry.
What am I missing?
 

QuietTexan

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Nov 16, 2020
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Texas
My rangefinder has a ballistics system where I can manually input atmospherics, but by itself the rangefinder is not capable of measuring them like a Kestrel is.
 

AUsome4x4

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Unless I'm misunderstanding, the new rangefinders like the KILO 2400 measure "temperature, pressure, humidity, and density altitude," an internal compass heading allows it to calculate coriolis effect, plus it calculates spin drift and aerodynamic jump," and incorporates them into the ballistic solution (https://www.longrangehunting.com/ar...-abs-ballistic-rangefinder-review.1097/?amp=1).
I think the Leica 2800.com is similar.
Sounds to me like they replace the Kestrel for everything but wind (and I've always heard an anemometer is only good for where you're standing - doesn't help down range).
That said, I see a lot of people talking about pairing these rangefinders w/Kestrels. So, is it for a backup? Is it to confirm readings? Or am I dreaming about gorgonzola cheese when it's clearly brie time, baby?
 

QuietTexan

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Nov 16, 2020
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Texas
The wind is the important part. All the other stats matter but not nearly as much - a 10,000 ft change in DA is just over 0.1 mils of vertical adjustment for my load, arguably within the error range of shooting from a field position and not major when you're looking at an 8" vitals zone on an animal. But blowing the wind call by 5mph can put you off by a half mil horizontally, five times as much error in the shot. A bad wind call will reduce your hit probability by half, whereas being off on your atmospherics barely moves the needle if your range is within +/- 5 yards, which most consumer range finders will do inside 800 yards. Unless you play wind reading games and can guess within +/-3mph already, the Kestrel will actually be more helpful in increasing first round hit probabilities than the range finder itself.

From a practical perspective, you'd also be better off making a couple wind and range brackets so that you can focus on pulling the trigger - we don't pick when the animal walks out so being on the gun ready to go increases your hit probability by a whole lot compared to not being on the gun. Range out what you can see, take a wind reading every so often, look at your brackets on a notecard, and don't be messing with any of it when it's time to do work.

 
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