question for ELR hunters

Professor Doolittle

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For ELR hunters, do you think it’s possible that part of the reason an animal can be hit but not go down is not just because the bullet has low kinetic energy after all that distance but because the spin of the bullet is keeping it parallel to the axis of the bore which is pointed somewhat high in the sky so when the bullet hits only part of the momentum is behind the tip, that the bullet is hitting somewhat broadside, spreading out the impact energy on a bigger surface area of hide rather than a point puncture.
 

BallisticsGuy

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Apparently OP thinks the angle of repose of a bullet fired long range is some substantial number. It is most certainly not the case for direct fire weapons. Even if you had to use 240MOA of up on a shot which would be enough to get a .45-70 running black powder charges and a 500gr bullet to 800yrds, that's only 4 degrees off the line of sight.

If you were firing something with such a rainbow trajectory as to have the shank of the bullet hit the target then you're firing a mortar.
 

StanleyActual

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Apparently OP thinks the angle of repose of a bullet fired long range is some substantial number. It is most certainly not the case for direct fire weapons. Even if you had to use 240MOA of up on a shot which would be enough to get a .45-70 running black powder charges and a 500gr bullet to 800yrds, that's only 4 degrees off the line of sight.

If you were firing something with such a rainbow trajectory as to have the shank of the bullet hit the target then you're firing a mortar.

***whispers*** sshhh don’t encourage him. We’re just here for the gifs…😉
 

Professor Doolittle

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Apparently OP thinks the angle of repose of a bullet fired long range is some substantial number. It is most certainly not the case for direct fire weapons. Even if you had to use 240MOA of up on a shot which would be enough to get a .45-70 running black powder charges and a 500gr bullet to 800yrds, that's only 4 degrees off the line of sight.

If you were firing something with such a rainbow trajectory as to have the shank of the bullet hit the target then you're firing a mortar.
I was taking extreme long range hunting, the name of this forum, to be the distances of extreme long range shooting, i.e. a mile or more. Yes, I can see that if you're talking about under 1000 yards then the effect I'm asking about wouldn't be very relevant. Thanks for explaining that.
 

DJ Fergus

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For ELR hunters, do you think it’s possible that part of the reason an animal can be hit but not go down is not just because the bullet has low kinetic energy after all that distance but because the spin of the bullet is keeping it parallel to the axis of the bore which is pointed somewhat high in the sky so when the bullet hits only part of the momentum is behind the tip, that the bullet is hitting somewhat broadside, spreading out the impact energy on a bigger surface area of hide rather than a point puncture.
I've made instant kills & far from instant kills. Many people will say that shot placement makes all of the difference but I've gutted animals with half of their heart gone and they still ran 40 yards. Bullet choice and impact velocity makes the difference between the animal being DRT or running. High velocity which contributes to hydrostatic shock will stun an animal. That along with enough damage to the vitals will provide instant kills. Higher impact velocity will provide instant kills more often than not. At distance, the bullet may have slowed enough that it lessens the likelihood of hydrostatic shok.
 
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