Problems with annealing by hand?

TX mountain hunter

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Dec 17, 2010
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257
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West Texas
Rather than jump in and buy a high end annealer or rig something up, I decided to attempt a simple hand speed rotation until the flame changes color then dropping into water or on a wet rag.

Everything seems to be doing fine. I feel like it’s better to do this than nothing every few firings.

What are your thoughts? More harm than good? How so if that is the case, HOW would it negatively impact accuracy if at all?
 

Cemetery21

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Jan 10, 2021
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Southwest MO
I ruined some 25-06 cases years ago when I didn't know any better. Stood them up in a pan of water and torched the necks until they started to turn red then tipped them over into water. Loaded them and the necks were dead soft - got them too hot. If the shoulders survived seating bullets, then they collapsed on firing. I think the necks didn't seal the chamber and gas pressure got as far back as the shoulders (which were also soft) and caved them in. Only shot 2 of them and quit.

I read as much as I could find about annealing temps after that and had better success. I now run a Giraud. Not for accuracy reasons, although it might help. I do it to save brass. I was splitting necks on up to 15% of my brass at 4-6 firings. Since using to Giraud, zero brass lost to split necks - they go until the primer pockets loosen - 12-20 firings.
 

TX mountain hunter

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Dec 17, 2010
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257
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West Texas
I do it by hand. Haven’t had any issues, besides burned up fingers. You need to turn the brass in the flame, it does get hot.
Thank you both for the replies. By fingers is how I do it, quickly turning to get all sides and dropping when it gets hot or a clear color change after 4-7 seconds.

Good to hear no noticeable accuracy concerns so far.
 

imyourhuckleberry

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Jun 10, 2009
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texas
Annealing by hand is better than not annealing. My grandfather taught to just hold the case between thumb and nose finger and when the case starts to get hot stop and go to the next case. Don't heat it to where you can not hold it between the fingers. This method has worked for several decades, it is slow doing it one by one but has kept me from washing dishes many times.
 

nwmnbowhunter

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Nov 13, 2017
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202
I used a 9/16 socket, tape down trigger so it rotates about once per second.

Set case into socket. Adjust torch until bright blue flame is about an inch long [fairly low setting], i then aim torch slightly downward angle right at the shoulder. Bright blue flame just about touching case. This leaves the case mouth above the flame. I do this is a dark room with door shut. Case changes color about 6-8 seconds. I watch the case mouth, see a faint glow and stop. I wear a welding glove on left hand for removing each case.

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JMW67

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Dec 6, 2012
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2,069
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TEXAS
I annealed by hand for years got the scares to prove it, I had no problem with it till I got the annealeez machine good machine at a very fair price if you decide to get an annealer this is one to look at its not the best machine out there but I think its about the best bang for your buck
 

Sockeye66

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Mar 24, 2020
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Washington
I agree with Dosh on this subject, flame location, angle, and duration must be consistent to get most from annealing. I made a copy of the DIY annealer from YouTube and it works great for 100 bucks, money very well spent IMO when Lapua brass costs more than that per 100.
 

Saskquatch6

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Joined
Dec 2, 2012
Messages
47
Location
Saskatchewan
Rather than jump in and buy a high end annealer or rig something up, I decided to attempt a simple hand speed rotation until the flame changes color then dropping into water or on a wet rag.

Everything seems to be doing fine. I feel like it’s better to do this than nothing every few firings.

What are your thoughts? More harm than good? How so if that is the case, HOW would it negatively impact accuracy if at all
TX mountain hunter - was in same boat as you and decided to give the Salt Bath Annealing process a try. See links below. I know there have been a number of threads on this forum from about 6 months ago. Fairly low cost to get into especially if you already have a Lee Melter. I have just started this week with my set-up and am impressed with how easy and consistent the process is. Don't have much data for you yet, but other members (entoptics and cshootersolutions) have done some work using SBA and their posts are available here on LRH. Another good option IMO.


https://ballisticrecreations.ca/
 

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