Poor Man's 270 Sherman Possibility?

Muddyboots

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Feb 7, 2013
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Michigan
One options it rebarrel with another .270, longer barrel and faster twist to take advantage of the newer longer higher BC bullets out there. This will allow you to use everything you have and have enough rifle to kill anything you want out to medium long range distances of 500-600 accurately. The .270 Win is getting a lot more love with the right barrel and twist now. Once you have gotten the reloading down, got the LR bug everything goes off the table then for complete restart. Try Preferred Barrel for start, 5R rifling, any length or contour you want and they will rebarrel for you if you want. Great way to start down the bottomless hole of LRH. I use to think the definition of a boat (hole in water that you throw money into or "B.O.A.T=bring another thousand" was unique but have come to realize it applies to LRH as well.😅
 

codyadams

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Well, let’s be fair....in a budget build where you are not dropping this into a premium stock or custom action, don’t x caliber, McGowen, Douglas, Shilen chromo make a lot of sense?
Might as well buy a factory gun then. If you want it to be accurate, get a quality barrel. Your only saving $100 at most, and sacrificing quality on the most important part of a rifle.
 

nksmfamjp

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Jan 5, 2004
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292
Might as well buy a factory gun then. If you want it to be accurate, get a quality barrel. Your only saving $100 at most, and sacrificing quality on the most important part of a rifle.
Pretty strong words, when the reports about those lower priced barrels are always better than factory. I have read negative, but it was always how they look under a bore scope, not how they shoot. Hmmmm.

McGowen blanks are around $200....Krieger around $350, right?
 

Mustang72

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Feb 9, 2019
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Nothing wrong with nice expensive barrels but factory barrels don't get enough respect imho. I have more than one that shoot 1/2 moa and under. Takes some time to find the right load to get them there. Plenty of people have dropped a lot of cash on a custom job that doesn't shoot any more accurate than a factory rifle with the proper load.
 

codyadams

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Pretty strong words, when the reports about those lower priced barrels are always better than factory. I have read negative, but it was always how they look under a bore scope, not how they shoot. Hmmmm.

McGowen blanks are around $200....Krieger around $350, right?
I would argue that they are not "always" better than factory. My smith told me that a few of the budget brands he installed had issues, including overly rapid throat erosion, bad copper fouling, and very challenging to find consistent loads for.

Mcgowen are $230 in stainless at their cheapest option, plus shipping. Broughton, Brux, krieger etc. start around 300-350.

I would personally rather spend another $100 and get a guaranteed good barrel rather than toss $250 at one that will more than likely shoot good.

I do have a mcgowen barreled rifle, it is very picky, and does foul noticeably more than the kriegers, brux, or lilja barrels I have. It reminds me of a factory barrel, not a custom. I won't get another budget brand for a precision rifle, and I am not made of money. Another rifle that the same smith rebarreled at the same time with a krieger runs circles around it, cleans up way easier, and holds accuracy for twice as many rounds.

That is where my strong words come from.
 
Last edited:

birdiemc

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San Antonio, TX
Lots of good recommendations here about what you should do when you're ready to start reloading and upgrading, but I want to put my vote in for the more practice option. And I'll suggest something nobody else has, 22lr for practicing. You can buy 500 for less than a box of .270win. That's a whole lot more trigger time for money spent.

It's a lot easier to get the fundamentals of shooting squared away behind one of those or for that matter an air rifle, than something that kicks like a .270 or 7mm RM. Unless I've completely misread the conversation I bet you would benefit most from confidence and skills gained from shooting a smaller, lighter recoiling, cheaper to fire cartridge.
 

nksmfamjp

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Jan 5, 2004
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292
I would argue that they are not "always" better than factory. My smith told me that a few of the budget brands he installed had issues, including overly rapid throat erosion, bad copper fouling, and very challenging to find consistent loads for.

Mcgowen are $230 in stainless at their cheapest option, plus shipping. Broughton, Brux, krieger etc. start around 300-350.

I would personally rather spend another $100 and get a guaranteed good barrel rather than toss $250 at one that will more than likely shoot good.

I do have a mcgowen barreled rifle, it is very picky, and does foul noticeably more than the kriegers, brux, or lilja barrels I have. It reminds me of a factory barrel, not a custom. I won't get another budget brand for a precision rifle, and I am not made of money. Another rifle that the same smith rebarreled at the same time with a krieger runs circles around it, cleans up way easier, and holds accuracy for twice as many rounds.

That is where my strong words come from.
thanks. I appreciate your experience.
 

djfergus

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Dec 25, 2015
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998
Hello all. I've got a hankering to get a cartridge with a bit more oomph to it, to customize/have customized a rifle, and to start reloading, all at once. The kicker is that I'm on a very, very tight budget. I know, this is already probably a recipe for disaster. Anyway, here's an idea that I had.

I have a Mossberg Patriot in .270 Win. I've read up on the 270 Sherman, and it seems like it will give me the performance that I'm looking for (something around a 7mm Rem Mag). I've looked at Boyd's stocks and like their thumbhole stocks a lot. I have been wanting to bed my action, and getting a new stock would be an excellent excuse to try that out. I don't have any reloading equipment (or experience) currently, but it's something that I've really wanted to do, and I've got 100 pieces of .270 brass lying around just waiting. The barrel on it is a 22" 1:10" twist. I've been getting about 1.5" accuracy at 100 yards, which I'm hoping to remedy with practice, reloading, and bedding. I don't think I could get the rifle rebarreled, and I'm not sure it's something that any gunsmiths would want to do on the budget Mossberg action (not to mention I don't think it's in the budget). Is it a terrible idea to have my rifle rechambered to 270 Sherman? I hunt in the West and want a rifle capable of long range hunting (not saying the .270 Win won't do the job; I just want something that would do it a little better). Or should I just save those pennies and get something else in another caliber (7mm Rem Mag?).
I really like the looks of the wood stock on the Patriot. Yours has a standard size bolt head. Which, it may be interchangeable like a Savage. I haven't looked closely enough at the Patriot to remember it it's a floating bolt head. It can be rebarreled, I'm not sure that it could be rechambered. It's a 10 twist barrel that you have and it likely wouldn't do well with the heavier bullets. Different gunsmiths will have different opinions of what to do. Some may tell you it's not going to be economical, another one who is more likely to think outside the box my take the project on. Sometimes it's hard to recoup any of what you spend if it's not a 700, Winchester 70, tikka or a custom action. But if you plan on keeping it, then all that doesn't necessarily matter.
 

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