Please school me on breaks

ATH

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Oct 7, 2003
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Lizton, IN
With a kid in the picture that changes things. My 9yo son was recoil sensitive so I built him an AR pistol in 6.5 Grendel with a Heathen brake with 90 degree rear ports to reduce blast. Worked well for him. But my 11yo daughter won't shoot the rifle due to the combination of short barrel and noise...she shot the same brake on a 22 inch 6X45 with no complaints. But she's also recoil sensitive so I'm left with limited options for this particular kid other than going through the paperwork for a suppressor over the next year, as the 6X45 was never a convenient option for a person of her stature.

In general, I'm a fan of the 90 degree rear ports. IMHO they do greatly reduce blast felt to the shooter. They don't maximize recoil reduction but it's a matter of balance. I use such a brake on my 14lb 338 Edge.
 

greenejc

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Dec 26, 2012
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Colorado, currently
I’m building a new rifle and want to put a break on it so my kids can shoot it without too much trouble. It’s a 308 so the recoil is pretty mild for me but maybe not a 12 year old. So, what is the difference between 1 piece and 2 piece, self timing, and port position?

I’ve done a lot of reading on breaks and it seems like a lot of info is more opinions. I know they work for recoil reduction because I have shot rifles with and without them. How do 1 piece vs. 2 piece breaks work and why would you choose one over the other?

There are a lot of opinions on port position and direction (90 degree vs forward vs rear facing ports). What gives? It’s tough to understand when 1 manufacture says one thing then another says the complete opposite ( I understand marketing but dang it’s confusing). Do ports on top really effect rifle positioning for follow up shots because it pushes the muzzle down???

This rifle is going to be my primary hunting rig but I also plan on spending a lot of time behind it at the range. I’ll probably use a break at the range but hunt without it. I know I will have to confirm zero if and when I take off or put on the break.

Anyways I would love to hear from you guys that have used and experimented with different types of breaks.
Eric Cortina makes a great brake for the .308 winchester. You can find him on youtube. His brake is also a barrel tuner and isn't a big, bulky brake. It is going to be pretty close to the contour of the barrel its installed on. You don't need a big, wide artillery looking brake for a .308 or really any rifle up to at least 300 WinMag and 35 Whelen. I have a brake installed on 1 each 300WinMag and one 35 Whelen. They match the contours of my heavy sporter barrels and take the recoil of both rifles down to about 243 winchester levels. Check with a reputable gunsmith and ask him for a good brake that doesn't detract from the lines of the rifle. There are several companies and individuals who manufacture brakes that will suit a .308. But check out Eric's brake/barrel tuner. It may be the best out there. He designed it and uses it to shoot long-range competition, and he's nationally rated in that sport, so it works really well.
 

greenejc

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I didn't really answer your question. I'd go with a one-piece because there's less to go wrong if all I wanted was a basic brake. Ports should be angled at around 45 deg. keep in mind back blast which will increase due to the brake. But if I had the money, I'd buy Eric's brake and tuner, because it works. Its similar to the Boss system that Browning still puts on some of its rifles.
 

2 the Plug

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May 1, 2018
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Eastern Missouri
Are they a pain to take off and put back on? I just want it as an option if I were to take the kids to the range but I don’t think I would hunt with one.
Depends how you would define “a pain.” Can it be done sure, but not as easy as changing a sling, bipod or even an optic. I made the mistake of not taking my first one out of the stock and into an action vise. No horror story but when I was done I could see I changed where it sat in the barrel channel. A Tipton Gun Vise is not equal to an action or barrel vise, either is better than what I did the first time. Barrel vise is best to again reduce torque on parts you're not wanting torqued.
Personally, I don't like to have to get out the vise just to load up for the range or setup for someone else. Also, I always check my 0 after adding/removing a brake because they can change POI, so you'd be going back to the range again before that hunt. Personally, I'd decide if it's really needed or set it, forget it and get a 2nd rifle for your needs.
 

greenejc

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Colorado, currently
Depends how you would define “a pain.” Can it be done sure, but not as easy as changing a sling, bipod or even an optic. I made the mistake of not taking my first one out of the stock and into an action vise. No horror story but when I was done I could see I changed where it sat in the barrel channel. A Tipton Gun Vise is not equal to an action or barrel vise, either is better than what I did the first time. Barrel vise is best to again reduce torque on parts you're not wanting torqued.
Personally, I don't like to have to get out the vise just to load up for the range or setup for someone else. Also, I always check my 0 after adding/removing a brake because they can change POI, so you'd be going back to the range again before that hunt. Personally, I'd decide if it's really needed or set it, forget it and get a 2nd rifle for your needs.
Very good advice.
 

Steve biden

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Joined
Dec 15, 2012
Messages
39
Location
Melbourne Australia.
I’m building a new rifle and want to put a break on it so my kids can shoot it without too much trouble. It’s a 308 so the recoil is pretty mild for me but maybe not a 12 year old. So, what is the difference between 1 piece and 2 piece, self timing, and port position?

I’ve done a lot of reading on breaks and it seems like a lot of info is more opinions. I know they work for recoil reduction because I have shot rifles with and without them. How do 1 piece vs. 2 piece breaks work and why would you choose one over the other?

There are a lot of opinions on port position and direction (90 degree vs forward vs rear facing ports). What gives? It’s tough to understand when 1 manufacture says one thing then another says the complete opposite ( I understand marketing but dang it’s confusing). Do ports on top really effect rifle positioning for follow up shots because it pushes the muzzle down???

This rifle is going to be my primary hunting rig but I also plan on spending a lot of time behind it at the range. I’ll probably use a break at the range but hunt without it. I know I will have to confirm zero if and when I take off or put on the break.

Anyways I would love to hear from you guys that have used and experimented with different types of breaks.
Check out Mark and Sam After Work. He has a good talk on brakes and is very informative. One of the slo mos shows a top port not only stopping muzzle rise but actually bending the barrel down.
 

SSgt G Cody

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Feb 23, 2020
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136
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Asheville, NC
I have a question about brakes. I recently saw a German shooter using a big can (about 3x10 in.) at the 1K range. It was fairly quiet. His inner brake was surrounded by a solid can, open at the muzzle. There appeared to be a gap of about 1/4 in. between inner brake and can. It was very quiet for a .338 Lapua! Is anyone familiar with this design???
 

KSB209

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Sep 17, 2014
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Location
Republic of California
Depends how you would define “a pain.” Can it be done sure, but not as easy as changing a sling, bipod or even an optic. I made the mistake of not taking my first one out of the stock and into an action vise. No horror story but when I was done I could see I changed where it sat in the barrel channel. A Tipton Gun Vise is not equal to an action or barrel vise, either is better than what I did the first time. Barrel vise is best to again reduce torque on parts you're not wanting torqued.
Personally, I don't like to have to get out the vise just to load up for the range or setup for someone else. Also, I always check my 0 after adding/removing a brake because they can change POI, so you'd be going back to the range again before that hunt. Personally, I'd decide if it's really needed or set it, forget it and get a 2nd rifle for your needs.
Thanks. This is info I was looking for. I just didn’t know if it was a screw on screw off process or if it was a little move involved. Appreciate the intel
 

FEENIX

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Dec 20, 2008
Messages
17,691
Location
Great Falls, MT
I have a question about brakes. I recently saw a German shooter using a big can (about 3x10 in.) at the 1K range. It was fairly quiet. His inner brake was surrounded by a solid can, open at the muzzle. There appeared to be a gap of about 1/4 in. between inner brake and can. It was very quiet for a .338 Lapua! Is anyone familiar with this design???
Is it something like this? >>> https://www.wittmachine.net/sme-sound-mitigation-equipment-non-class-iii/. If so, Grizzly GunWorks used to make something similar.
 

Triple BB

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Dec 12, 2002
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664
Location
Wyoming
Silencers won't work for my hunting style. They don't fit in a rifle scabbard plus I don't need 3' of barrel hanging off my pack walking through thick timber. I've also dumped several radial brakes. Don't enjoy dirt and debris blowing in my face when shooting near the ground. The Ti series brakes are the hot new brakes. I've put one on a 338 Edge and another on a 300 RUM. They make it easier to see hits and work well in reducing felt recoil...
 

DWier

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May 16, 2019
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Orlando, Florida
For a 12 year old the 308 might be a bit much & start the child flinching. I suggest a very mild say very light bullet. Muzzle brakes! Yes but noise is a major factor (obviously using ear muffs) but probably a good idea and as the child gets older/more experienced then use full loads etc. Last thing you want is the shooter developing a flinch!
If you decide to go with a different gun, I would look at 6.5cm without a brake. Very little felt recoil. With my APA lil bastard there is essentially no felt recoil but LOUD!
 

greenejc

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Joined
Dec 26, 2012
Messages
710
Location
Colorado, currently
Give me a “BRAKE” this has been covered a few times and I know the error of my ways. But thanks for the helpful info.
I knew what you were asking about, and everyone makes spelling errors at one time or the other. Do check out Eric Cortina's muzzle brakes. They're not over sized and they are also barrel harmonics tuners. They'll reduce recoil by about 40 percent and increase your accuracy by around 50%.
 
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