Peterson Brass Review

QuietTexan

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At any event, they claim the brass is being over worked. ...As for my shoulder bump it was adjusted to 2 thousandths. .. As for the mandrel part, I don't really understand TBH.
You are overworking your brass. It's ironic to me that you admit that you don't understand total range of movement of the neck in an FL die with sizing button installed and yet you're disagreeing with Peterson about it. You aren't "bumping" anything in an FL die on the first or second resizing either.

The line about not having problems in other brass brands doesn't really have any value, that another brand is better at being abused doesn't have any bearing on if the cases are uniform over their life or not.

It seems like you don't understand sizing die dimensions and set up, if you'd like to learn more this is a good video to watch. Start at 17 minutes at watch through 20 minutes for an explanation of cartridge headspace during sizing, and why you're oversizing brass if you're "bumping" on the initial resizing of cases that still chamber in your rifle:
 

orkan

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You are overworking your brass. It's ironic to me that you admit that you don't understand total range of movement of the neck in an FL die with sizing button installed and yet you're disagreeing with Peterson about it. You aren't "bumping" anything in an FL die on the first or second resizing either.

The line about not having problems in other brass brands doesn't really have any value, that another brand is better at being abused doesn't have any bearing on if the cases are uniform over their life or not.

It seems like you don't understand sizing die dimensions and set up, if you'd like to learn more this is a good video to watch. Start at 17 minutes at watch through 20 minutes for an explanation of cartridge headspace during sizing, and why you're oversizing brass if you're "bumping" on the initial resizing of cases that still chamber in your rifle:

Some additional resources on the subject:








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Patton243

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Aug 12, 2016
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You are overworking your brass. It's ironic to me that you admit that you don't understand total range of movement of the neck in an FL die with sizing button installed and yet you're disagreeing with Peterson about it. You aren't "bumping" anything in an FL die on the first or second resizing either.

The line about not having problems in other brass brands doesn't really have any value, that another brand is better at being abused doesn't have any bearing on if the cases are uniform over their life or not.

It seems like you don't understand sizing die dimensions and set up, if you'd like to learn more this is a good video to watch. Start at 17 minutes at watch through 20 minutes for an explanation of cartridge headspace during sizing, and why you're oversizing brass if you're "bumping" on the initial resizing of cases that still chamber in your rifle:


I watched this video and there's nothing I'm doing differently compared to what he's saying. I know how to set a die and I know how to do the measurements. No where in this video does he mention the term "mandrel" which Peterson keeps referring to in their responses. I told them MULTIPLE times I'm not using a bushing die. It seems to me they cannot grasp that at all. And if they're telling me their brass needs certain criteria, such as using a bushing die, then it's substandard quality if you ask me.
 

Philward

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Oct 17, 2015
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You are overworking your brass. It's ironic to me that you admit that you don't understand total range of movement of the neck in an FL die with sizing button installed and yet you're disagreeing with Peterson about it. You aren't "bumping" anything in an FL die on the first or second resizing either.

The line about not having problems in other brass brands doesn't really have any value, that another brand is better at being abused doesn't have any bearing on if the cases are uniform over their life or not.

It seems like you don't understand sizing die dimensions and set up, if you'd like to learn more this is a good video to watch. Start at 17 minutes at watch through 20 minutes for an explanation of cartridge headspace during sizing, and why you're oversizing brass if you're "bumping" on the initial resizing of cases that still chamber in your rifle:

I think at the 26 minute mark, after fully sizing the neck and considering that it may be the initial firing of the case in the rifle, I would try the case in the rifle to check if the bolt will close with ease. A person may be able to simply neck size after the first firing, as long as the bolt will close without resistance. Realizing that Orkan had checked the fit post firing and he knows there is some drag when closing the bolt, his experience tells him to go ahead and bump shoulder back. Other people will have different results.

I would try the case in rifle at that time at any rate with a first firing.
 

QuietTexan

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Your attitude is part of your problem. You apparently can't conceive that anything you've done has caused the problem, so you're pushing all the blame off to Peterson. Do you want a shoulder to cry on, or do you want someone to tell you the hard truth about what you're doing that's contributing to your problems?

You apparently don't know how an FL die works, if you did you would know that the die itself sizes the neck to a much smaller OD than is necessary and then expands the neck back up using something known variously as an expander ball, sizing ball, expander button, sizing button (Redding's Term*), what Peterson is referring to as the "mandrel", and what you called the "carbide insert". We can quibble about the semantics of calling it a mandrel versus a button, but at the end of the day it's the same thing.
I'm using a Redding FL resizer non-bushing with a Carbide insert

The excessive movement in and out is hardening the neck of your cases. To Peterson's point if you used a bushing die the total amount of movement inwards in the die and outwards over the button would be significantly less, thus work hardening the brass less.

The second factor here is that depending on what the radial clearance of your chamber is you could have the cases moving excessively outwards when fired, which adds even more to the total movement amount. The total movement is what will contribute to work hardening of the case neck and shoulder.

* - https://www.redding-reloading.com/online-catalog/28-carbide-size-button-kits


A few cases, after the second firing, split.... After the third firing of the same lot, I had a few more split. When I went to resize them again, I had approximately 5 cases of 55 split the necks. .... Furthermore, I checked my shoulder bump and it was around 2 thousandths with my Hornady gauge.
You did not "bump" your cases in a Redding FL sizing die on the first resizing. If (as the video you claimed you watched told you) your cases chambered without resistance , then when sized in a correctly set up FL die your shoulders should have not moved, or potentially may have moved forward during the first resizing. If you resized a case down that was not fully expanded to the chamber then you oversized the case and there was too much movement on the subsequent firing.

A Forster "bump die" doesn't actually size the body of the case down, and instead sizes the neck and can slightly set the shoulder back at the same time. A Redding FL die will size down the body of the case, which is what leads to the shoulders moving forward on the first sizing if they're still short of the shoulders in the chamber.

It's not hard at all to move the shoulders of a case back 0.002", but it does seem to be hard to wait enough firings until cases actually need it. If you don't wait, you never find the real end of the chamber, and you overwork your brass.


A person may be able to simply neck size after the first firing, as long as the bolt will close without resistance.
The Erik Cortina "Don't Neck Size Your Brass!!!" Fan Club that calls everyone who neck sizes stupid seems to forget the tiny tidbit of letting cases form to the chamber before bumping it an important step.
 
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