Peterson Brass Belted Mag Basic Unprimed Box of 50

Calvin45

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A deep socket spun in an electric drill and a propane torch ain't fancy but it works.

Annealing is highly likely to improve the success rate of case forming, measured in case life and fewer lost to early splits. You don't have to be perfect, just 'good enough.'

  1. Start spinning the case and aim the inner, lighter blue part of the flame just below the shoulder / body junction.
  2. Heat until the part in the flame begins to glow a dull red. Anneal in a mostly dark room so you can see this.
  3. When the glow begins, dump the case into a catch pan. An disposable aluminum baking pan works. Water isn't required, the case cools quickly and unlike steel, quenching has zero effect on how the brass turns out.
  4. No need to over do it though the time and temp range is relatively broad. Getting a dull (not bright red) glow indicates you're softening the brass.
  5. Reaching that dull red glow should take 3-6 seconds. That's slow enough to be controllable. If it happens in 1-2 seconds, try turning the flame down some or holding the case further out of the flame.
The number of cases you lose to trial and error will almost certainly be less than the number lost to early splits caused by the combined stress of un-annealed forming + firing.

I built an induction annealer for under $200 but it's powerful (heats quickly) so a learning curve is involved. IME, flame annealing is a) proven and b) controllable. A ton of different experiences, information and misinformation is on the Interwebs. This guy is a metallurgical engineer and a shooter, has a series of vids on annealing. Of all the stuff I've seen he has the most sensible approach and info.
Cool approach, might have to try that sometime.
 

Bghunter338

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Good work.

Can't wait to see how they turn out. Looking forward to the before and after pics from fireforming. Hopefully they group well for you during fireforming.

What's the neck diameter on your finished round?
@eshorebwhntr
The shoulders formed nicely. The neck thickness is right at .014 all the way around. The base right above the belt is .510. The one thing I did learn is trim the brass long. I trimmed them to 2.840 like the book said and after fireforming they came out to 2.820-2.824. Next time I'm going to trim them to 2.850 20220920_013645.jpg
 

eshorebwhntr

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That's awesome man. You have my respect for jumping into that. Good job and thanks for sharing for the rest of us.

The trimming lesson is one I learned a few years back the same way you just did. No biggie but good to mention.

I've heard good things about peterson brass but haven't had the opportunity to use it. Hopefully it lasts you 6-8x cycles.
 

Bghunter338

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Jun 1, 2019
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Wilder, Idaho
That's awesome man. You have my respect for jumping into that. Good job and thanks for sharing for the rest of us.

The trimming lesson is one I learned a few years back the same way you just did. No biggie but good to mention.

I've heard good things about peterson brass but haven't had the opportunity to use it. Hopefully it lasts you 6-8x cycles.
I'll let you know as these 5 are my test subjects lol 😆 I'm hoping to at least get five firings out of them.
 

josh_127

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Jul 4, 2021
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alliance nebraska
Definitely should do better than five reloadings...I'm on my 6th firing with nosler brass in the stw and ive only lost a few, so far, to loose primer pockets...I run peterson brass in two other calibers and it's my favorite brass by far. I do think if you annealed before every step in the forming down it'd probably help with ease of forming and the longevity of the case.
 

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