Palming the stock

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by carbinero, May 28, 2011.

  1. carbinero

    carbinero Member

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    I would like to know more about this concern, as I am modifying a stock. I would also like to know how it effects shooting AR-style rifles. I would even appreciate a recommendation for a book which would reference this and other long range techniques, since google yielded next to nothing about it...

    I ran the below thread and got the basics, but it's still a little unclear to me, so I figured this would be the better forum.

    q: What is that, and why is that, is it significant, and lastly, do you need to compensate for it? I read about it here, while thinking about switching stocks: Remington 700 stocks.... - Maryland Shooters

    "Thumbhole design encourages mishandling (palming the stock, thumb pressure)"

    a: Palming is having your thumb not wrap around the top of the stock, rather it lays near the cocking piece of the bolt near the safety lever or below. There is a natural involuntary & sympathetic muscle contraction that is tied between your thumb and trigger finger. If you move your thumb, your trigger finger will move slightly. The more you remove the thumb out of the equation, the more likely you'll have better trigger control when you press the trigger. It's also another reason the vertical angle on most tactical stocks are popular.

    Personally, I don't care for thumbhole stocks. For me, they tend to slow me down on my follow up shots. To each, their own though.

    q: Many thanks. i will be conscious of that in the future. I assume this has the same effect on pistol grip stocks like AR-10?

    a: absolutely... I noticed a definite difference in precision just from thumb placement from my target grips.

    Palming the stock - Sniper's Hide Forums
     
  2. royinidaho

    royinidaho Well-Known Member

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    Well! All of a sudden I beg to differ with those answers.

    I qualify myself as not an expert rifleman, just a fella that can shoot stuff a long way aways, when necessary. I've also given everyone I've competed with in BR, shilouette, rock bustin', etc.

    I shoot rifles with all configurations mentioned.

    I had a long tirade going but shortened it to this: (Who says there are no miracles?:rolleyes:)

    One can either adapt to the rifle or adapt the rifle to personal fit.

    I shoot all equally well or poorly, depending on who you talk to. Palm swells, thumb holes and pistol grips are specifically fit, personnally, to my hands except for an SL-8 and a SIG 556. I adapt myself to their silly design.
     
  3. carbinero

    carbinero Member

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    Thanks Roy, I also just checked out your blog...looks good!

    I can appreciate the idea of adapting to the rifle, but this idea of "getting the thumb out of the way" was intriguing to me. I have been thinking especially of the AICS, then what both Manners and McMillan offer in terms of a "classic" design versus the cut-out on top so you can wrap your thumb around vis a vis a pistol grip. The classic is certainly less comfortable, but if that helps you shoot more consistently, who am I to argue?

    I also wonder why all stocks aren't made in some sort of warp-around style, since it's certainly more comfortable, unless it's simply due to manufacturing cost--since I assume the stock must be stronger to compensate for that cut-out.

    I wonder if there's a notable difference in effect on shooting offhand versus supported, and if the bench shooting would carry over into the field enough to minimize the difference...and thus adapt to the gun.

    I know I may be making a mountain out of a molehill, here, yet find it interesting nonetheless.
     
  4. royinidaho

    royinidaho Well-Known Member

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    Not a mountain out of a mole hill. It is important.

    I've found the thumb hole stock to me nearly perfect for me for off hand shooting. So good, in fact, that the only times I've ever been out shot in off hand competition I came in second, and not that often.:)

    For prone shooting I have one self made stock with a thumb hole and very straight and hand filling pistol grip. The trigger on this rifle is a stock Remmy 1950s 721. The trigger pull is around 2 pounds. When the trigger finger trips the trigger the finger pressure is directly in line with the meat at the base of the thumb. Even when I "yank" the trigger while testing firing the reticle doesn't move on the target and group size does not enlarge. Usually.:)

    The McMillan A-5 is a bit different. The only thing I don't like about it is the rough texture of the forearm and pistol grip area. I like smooth.

    However, I feel that I will be more comfortable with the A-5 with the thumb layed parallel to the line of bore on the right side of the cocking piece.

    It won't be until next year that I will be able to shoot the A-5 though.:rolleyes: