Pack or Bipod?

Pro2A

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 23, 2009
Messages
280
I’m curious to know what major advantages there are to a bipod over using a pack as a rest, mainly while prone. Consistency, accuracy, etc.

The weight of a bipod is negligible, to me anyways. My long range setup weighs in at 15lbs and only comes out on flat-land hunts or cross-canyon hunts. Otherwise I have a synthetic stock that I pack.
Although I do shoot from a bipod for convenience, I really prefer to shoot from my pack. A pack is preferred for more consistent support, recoil management, conformity to beneath surfaces, and predictable, consistent "riding" of the rifle. You are dealing only with relative movement between the rifle fore end and the pack....a relatively smooth, consistent coefficient of friction. Highly anal precision oriented bench rest shooters often employ free recoil for this reason. Whereas, the bipod reacts differently....often skittering, flexing, exhibiting looseness/slop..... depending upon surface it contacts (even different for each foot on any shot).....concrete, boards, roofing, dirt, rock, snow, vegetation, clean, gritty, wet....and the bipod feet....rubber, spike, sled....that are employed. Also, facilitates avoiding cant (you do use a level, right???) as bipods typically have finite increment leg lengths and cant range. Another parameter seldom considered is under loading, the bipod vertical height becomes slightly fore shortened. Then, under recoil, that lost height is regained with a raising of barrel. It is akin to canting the rifle left/right. Same as when a clock hand begins to sweep off of dead vertical 12 o'clock toward 3 o'clock. The pack also offers somewhat added movement concealment during scoping/engaging target versus the open structure bipod. Also, I like the "ears" effect along side the fore end. Added, to a rear "eared" bag....corded/bungeed to the pack...... I feel it provides the most stable platform and best recoil management. Of course, we all learn differently and develop personal preferences. YMMV.
 

BrentM

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Joined
Jan 10, 2013
Messages
2,629
Location
Meridian, Idaho
curious as to why?
Just like any restriction. Someone decides to push the limits....boom rules. This one has several reasons and 1 is because people were mounting the rifles to vehicles. The state has lots of weapon restrictions to keep fair chase alive and with all the people now moving here and hunting they are getting more strict.
 

8x68s

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2019
Messages
256
Location
Salem, Oregon
geez, what ever happened to "no hunting from a vehicle" & "minimum 100 ft off the road"...(the rules in Oregon). I have a firm "bias", as one would say, against road hunters...LOL. Apologies to the OP for the distraction...
 

mwkelso

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2019
Messages
290
Location
Hayden, ID
@Pro2A Thank you for the response. Yes, I do have levels on my rifles for sure!

@8x68s No worries! I’m sure there are multiple reasons why the 16lb limit is in place. The two most common explanations that I often hear are to prevent the use of 50cals for ELR hunting, and that trailed by a couple of hunters who were shooting far beyond their limits that ended up wounding multiple animals in one bout of shooting.
I don’t know how legitimate those reasons are. I haven’t been able to verify them yet.
 

mwkelso

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2019
Messages
290
Location
Hayden, ID
+1, though I admire their dry, spiffy camo clothing and F250s that look like they've never seen dirt.

My backpack first. Tree or rocks second. Two of my chassis have scratches on the fore end because of boulders in WY, ID & UT.

Every nick and scratch tells a story though!
 

mwkelso

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2019
Messages
290
Location
Hayden, ID
Although I do shoot from a bipod for convenience, I really prefer to shoot from my pack. A pack is preferred for more consistent support, recoil management, conformity to beneath surfaces, and predictable, consistent "riding" of the rifle. You are dealing only with relative movement between the rifle fore end and the pack....a relatively smooth, consistent coefficient of friction. Highly anal precision oriented bench rest shooters often employ free recoil for this reason. Whereas, the bipod reacts differently....often skittering, flexing, exhibiting looseness/slop..... depending upon surface it contacts (even different for each foot on any shot).....concrete, boards, roofing, dirt, rock, snow, vegetation, clean, gritty, wet....and the bipod feet....rubber, spike, sled....that are employed. Also, facilitates avoiding cant (you do use a level, right???) as bipods typically have finite increment leg lengths and cant range. Another parameter seldom considered is under loading, the bipod vertical height becomes slightly fore shortened. Then, under recoil, that lost height is regained with a raising of barrel. It is akin to canting the rifle left/right. Same as when a clock hand begins to sweep off of dead vertical 12 o'clock toward 3 o'clock. The pack also offers somewhat added movement concealment during scoping/engaging target versus the open structure bipod. Also, I like the "ears" effect along side the fore end. Added, to a rear "eared" bag....corded/bungeed to the pack...... I feel it provides the most stable platform and best recoil management. Of course, we all learn differently and develop personal preferences. YMMV.
I haven’t really chosen my preference yet... I do like the solid feeling over a bipod, and yet I usually feel more comfortable on my pack. Especially when I’m proned out sideways on a hill, I don’t like feeling like I have to fight the bipod to get the bubble perfect inside the lines. It seems to go against the rule to not muscle the rifle.
Have you run into this issue before? How did you overcome it if so?
 

7magcreedmoor

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 23, 2012
Messages
712
Location
Lebanon County PA
Just like any restriction. Someone decides to push the limits....boom rules. This one has several reasons and 1 is because people were mounting the rifles to vehicles. The state has lots of weapon restrictions to keep fair chase alive and with all the people now moving here and hunting they are getting more strict.
Mounting on vehicles? What do think they are, Rat Patrol?
 

Wilderness Blacktail

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2010
Messages
146
Location
im surrounded by the marble mtn, trinity alps ans
My pack. I dislike the extra weight on my rifle as I always have it ready in my hand and just prefer the sleekness of it sans bipod.

I've shot with a bipod quite a bit and while its quick and handy in certain situations i come across it's also useless a fair bit of time.

My pack of one sort or another is always with me and I shoot off em a lot, and train to be solid in all situations, including load development and zeroing. I havent found a bipod helps results any.

Was just busting sub Moa rocks out to 1080 off a pack standing in pickup bed last week. Heck of a lot of fun.
 

codyadams

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2015
Messages
3,238
Location
Southwest Wyoming
The most stable platform I have found is actually an Arca rail in bottom of the rifle and my spotting scope tripod. The tripod can go from about 5" up to 50+, and is more stable than a bipod. Throw a bag under the rear, and from prone is as solid as a bench rest front rest and rear bag. Get up to sitting position with a cross stick or backpack frame under the rear, and it is still a solid 1000 yard set up. This is my preference
 

BrentM

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2013
Messages
2,629
Location
Meridian, Idaho
Here’s some positional.
EE8A877C-B633-4BAC-9D2D-00AA67BAD71D.jpeg
586375F0-DBE6-4D56-8517-E1B38CDE6340.jpeg
 

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