+P Throating

skookum

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Nov 2, 2011
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220
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Coeur D'Alene
Sounds like it will fill my needs nicely, i already figured on loosing a couple hundred rounds of barrel life, it sounds like Nosler anything is hard on barrels anyway. But getting some extra velocity out of a shorter barrel is what i wanted. I found Berger 208s, hoping to get them up to 3000 with a 22" barrel.
 

Northkill

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Aug 5, 2019
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PA
Some folks understand the limitations of a magnum and some don’t. Then there are those that just don’t care. If you run an Allen Mag I’m thinking you fall into the latter as burning barrels is a given. I’m sure it’s fun if you can afford it.
The Allen Mag is an ego trip for sure. I love mine. Never had to do more than a cold bore shot for hunting. It'll last a lifetime the way I use it. Stuff happens when you hit something with it for sure. I went with the 400MOD harder stainless from Bartlein, which is a great option for stuff like this.
 

Alex Wheeler

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Jul 5, 2017
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1,569
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Montana
The stepped throat originated from 50 BMG BR competition. It does work. But from what I have seen accuracy life is shorter and falls off faster. The throat is critical to accuracy, Im sure you have heard of setting a barrel back. You could just throat it some to sharpen the lead and get the same result. Personally, accuracy is more useful to me than speed. I have gone full circle to stuff that shoots really small.
 

Fiftydriver

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Jun 12, 2004
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7,206
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Fort Shaw, Montana
Some folks understand the limitations of a magnum and some don’t. Then there are those that just don’t care. If you run an Allen Mag I’m thinking you fall into the latter as burning barrels is a given. I’m sure it’s fun if you can afford it.
Not caring is not correct. If you use these extreme rounds as you would any other chambering you will go through barrels quickly. However if you understand their strengths and weaknesses, you can use them to exploit their fullest potential and not use them when its not needed.

i talk 10 customers out of my wildcats for every one i build, simply because they do not need one for their goals. Or i will explain how another of my wildcats or another chambering will serve them much better. I never push my products on anyone, but instead offer a meaningful conversation with the customer to learn what they want to do with this new rifle and then continue the conversation to make sure!

one would never use a top fuel 11,000 hp dragster to go pick up a gallon of milk, could not thing of a worse use for one, but to cover a 1/4 mile strip as fast as possible, could not think of a better use.

some common sense needs to be used in rifles as well. My first question to potential customers is “what other rifles do you own”. This tells me the flexibility they have in their equipment list.

if they tell me this will be their first and only big game rifle, i would rarely ever recommend one of my wildcats.

if they tell me they own something like a 6.5 creedmore and a 300 win mag for example But want a true hyper performance rifle, then yes, one of these such as a 7mm Allen Magnum would make much more sense.

to that same point, i would explain in great detail how the 7mm AM should be used. If your hunting whitetails in riverbottom country, use the creedmore, if your hunting elk in heavy timber, use the 400, if your going on a pronghorn hunt but also will have a few days of prairie dog hunting, take the creedmore and the 7mm AM.

point being know the strengths and limitation if all your rifles and use them appropriately.

same goes with these throat designs. There is no question they increase performance and also reduce throat life. Those are pros and cons that must be weighed. I did not feel it was worth it to my customers as my wildcats are designs with the ability to produce extreme performance on their own and still use a long accuracy life throat design.

Shawn decided to offer his throat as an option for any chambering As a performance boosting option which it certainly is.

again, understanding their limitations are critical to get the most out of them. How these throats are used will go a very long way to how long their lifes are. In honesty i would not recommend even three shot strings with them, or as few as possible. Practical field shooting would be the very best method.

i was told time and time again i would burn out the barrels on my 7mm AM rifles before ever finding a good load. This turned out to be total BS. If someone shot one of my 7mm AM rifles like they would a 6.5 creedmore, you will use up your barrel very quickly, if you use it how i recommend it will last well over a decade of very hard big game hunting use or more.

my last test rifle in 7mm AM was used for a load of ballistic testing and load development. I then reserved it for use only for big game hunting and took 34 head of big game at ranges from 500 to 1050 yards, all but two being one shot kills. The two that were not were one shooter error not setting the rifle up correctly and clean missed on the first shot. The followup shot was a clean kill at 670 yards on an old whitetail. The other was a bullet issue. Tried a new bullet, pinned the shoulders on a mule deer at 780 yards breaking them both but not killing the buck. Took a follow up shot to kill that deer.

that was after 10 seasons of use. When i stopped shooting that rifle, the bore was So warn it would not shoot the 180 gr bergers anymore and they would often come apart in flight. However, it still shot the 160 gr accubonds and 168 gr barnes LRX into 1/2 moa groups. The hammer bullets were not yet an option.

even so, i installed a fresh barrel and sold the rifle. To my knowledge its still being used properly and hard with good accuracy.

use them right for their design and life will amaze you. Use them wrong and the wifes tails will continue to dog them but more because or misuse then anything to do with the chambering
 

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