Opinions needed

xsn10s

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Mar 7, 2016
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I agree it depends on what is the sore spot in your reloading process. I got tired of trickling powder so I started trying some ball powders and small extruded powders. That solved the hand trickling for the most part. If you're preferred powder is large extruded then a electronic powder trickler would be a fine addition. I just began annealing by using a drill and propane torch. Is it the best method? Nope. However I'm not competing with anyone and I have fun shooting out to distance. Would I like an annealer? Sure would. I'd like a new rangefinder that measures out to a mile too. The list goes on lol. Whatever you feel would serve you best would be the best buy. Happy Black Friday!
 

wernerpd

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My vote is an RCBS Matchmaster. I bought it for two reasons. First, I wanted to move away from using a trickler for higher volume repetitive loads **and** have it capable enough to do accurate loads for my 6.5CM RPR. This will do both and it is fast. I have never had any problems with RCBS customer support.
 

rsbhunter

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Apr 3, 2006
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I'd buy a Chargemaster, and a case neck expander/sizer die and mandrel. I still trickle into the pan of my Chargemaster, set .1 gr low . It's amazing how much powder it can take to go from .1 to .2 tenths....It's enough that for precision (on my budget) trickling is worth my time. As for annealing, I built one of the motorized annealers using 2 torches..total cost about $120 with torches , gas, etc. I , like you believe that powder charge accuracy and neck tension consistency are two variables that we can control for a "resonable" amount of investment. If the lottery goes my way, there will be an AMP unit and $8,000 scale set up on the next brown truck!!!!!
 

rsbhunter

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Apr 3, 2006
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Another thing I take the time to do is brush the inside of necks and dip into a hbn or graphite media before neck expanding. Its amazing the consistency of bullet seating pressure you can achieve just doing the little things....The people on this forum will provide alot of invaluable info also.....rsbhunter
 

nksmfamjp

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you have to decide if brass life/sizing precision or powder throwing speed is a bigger issue.

IMO, I would spend my money on a powder thrower first. The auto trickler V4 is obviously top shelf, but I could be happy with the Hornady. I have the old Hornady and it works great for me. I will be looking for the auto trickle V4 next!

That said, the new Hornady has good accuracy and is more tunable for different powders…..I’d pro ably get that. I’m sure RCBS/Lyman is ok, but I have no experience.
 

skipglo

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I don't think annealer machines are worth the money when you can do it with a cordless drill with socket extension and a blowtorch.

I think the RCBS chargemaster is a good powder thrower. There are some on sale in the classifieds. One guy has 19 for sale. RCBS customer service is the best I've experienced. They warrantied a chargemaster that was 5yrs out of warranty for me. Gave me a new unit. So, I've had 2 units in 20yrs for the price of one.
I see someone paid attention to Beans video! And I would also buy the electronic scale first and foremost!
 

xsn10s

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I'll say this after working with induction forges. IMO it would be hard to anneal brass with more accuracy than a calibrated induction forge. I just cannot justify the costs right now. But if I had the money to burn I'd get one or build one.
 

Dragoon300

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Like everything, there are priorities. I bought the RCBS charge master years ago. I check every auto dispensed charge on an Ohaus beam scale that I calibrate with certified weights. Then use tweezers or trickle to adjust as close as I can, usually within 1/2 to 1 stick of powder. This is time consuming, but very doable for precision rifle. I am thinking my next investment will be the Amp anealer. I could certainly build a gas torch anealer, or even an induction anealer, however there is a learning curve, and with that it would cost more to make one than to simply purchase and enjoy it. To each his own, but I want more precision anealing for my $3 a piece brass cases, and the time and component cost I invest in loading them. In my experience and opinion accurate powder charges to 1/10 grain are a must! Annealing is a luxury that can wait a while. It will however become necessary when your brass hardens too much, and I have experienced this even with once fired military 300 win mag cases. So, I'm sure annealing is important enough to pursue.
 

bigdumboy

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Mar 23, 2011
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Changemaster Lite on sale
I was able to purchase one of these today $203 shipped to my door. Which I thought was a good deal. Now I have to start squirreling away money for my annealing machine hopefully by midsummer 6 kids make it hard to squirrel 🐿 it away. Would like to thank everyone for you time and words of wisdom.
Dirk
 

Roughrice

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May 5, 2021
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Louisiana
I was able to purchase one of these today $203 shipped to my door. Which I thought was a good deal. Now I have to start squirreling away money for my annealing machine hopefully by midsummer 6 kids make it hard to squirrel 🐿 it away. Would like to thank everyone for you time and words of wisdom.
Dirk
Hopefully it works for you! Mine has been working surprisingly well since they came out and rarely have to recalibrate.
I always check each load with other scales and is usually within a couple of kernels either way.
 
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