Old Bullets OK

nicholasjohn

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if you can find them, use them. They are flat out my favorite hunting bullet. I use Partitions to work up loads and then check a couple rounds with BBCs at 300. They expand wide, don’t lose any weight really and just hammer elk.

I’ve got a pile of them for 30, 7mm, 270, 338 and they are excellent hunting bullets. The 160 and 175’s are really super in a fast 7mm.



Very impressive expansion. Hawk bullets often look like that, too. From the notes that came with the bullets, it appears that these wouldn't work too well in a 280 Remington with 1-in-9" twist. I don't know if they ever made 140- or 150-grain BBC's in 7mm diameter, but that probably would have been more appropriate for my rifle. It's probably a pipe dream to think I'd ever find any, though. Thanks all the same for the pictures.
 

beretzs

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Very impressive expansion. Hawk bullets often look like that, too. From the notes that came with the bullets, it appears that these wouldn't work too well in a 280 Remington with 1-in-9" twist. I don't know if they ever made 140- or 150-grain BBC's in 7mm diameter, but that probably would have been more appropriate for my rifle. It's probably a pipe dream to think I'd ever find any, though. Thanks all the same for the pictures.

Bill made 132 and 140 BBCs. Those are what I use for the 280 and 7-08’s. No offense to Hawks but you cannot tear a BBC apart but you’d Pull a Hawke to pieces with fast twist and a lot of muzzle velocity.
 
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nicholasjohn

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Bill made 132 and 140 BBCs. Those are what I use for the 280 and 7-08’s. No offense to Hawks but you cannot tear a BBC apart but you’d Pull a Hawke to pieces with fast twist and a lot of muzzle velocity.

I think that a lot of things are different with rapid rotational velocities. Even with standard twist rates, ultra-light bullets sometimes come unraveled at the rapid rotation speeds that come with extreme muzzle velocities. I remember when everybody was going nuts over 40-grain bullets in the 22-250, and sometimes the thin-jacketed bullets didn't even make it to the target. With fast-twist barrels, bonding cores to jackets is probably essential. The long bearing surfaces of the heavier bullets are also a player in how they are going to behave. I've also read that high rotational velocity affects terminal performance of the bullet, but can't say that I've had any experiences to comment on. Can you comment on that ?
 

beretzs

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I think that a lot of things are different with rapid rotational velocities. Even with standard twist rates, ultra-light bullets sometimes come unraveled at the rapid rotation speeds that come with extreme muzzle velocities. I remember when everybody was going nuts over 40-grain bullets in the 22-250, and sometimes the thin-jacketed bullets didn't even make it to the target. With fast-twist barrels, bonding cores to jackets is probably essential. The long bearing surfaces of the heavier bullets are also a player in how they are going to behave. I've also read that high rotational velocity affects terminal performance of the bullet, but can't say that I've had any experiences to comment on. Can you comment on that ?

I’m a believer that RPMs work well with killing power. Especially with bullets that are tough enough to hold up to the forces.

I think even the killing effect we see from light skinned heavy, high BC bullets comes from the unglueing effect of high RPMs shredding stuff as expansion occurs.

I can’t say for absolute certain it makes kills faster but I’ve seen some great and fast kills with fast twist barrels and good Bullets. I know it doesn’t kill slower.

175 Woodleighs 8 twist 3090 FPS


132 BBC 3600 FPS 8 twist





I can’t see those petals hanging off not destroying a lot of tissue on their way through.
 

nicholasjohn

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I’m a believer that RPMs work well with killing power. Especially with bullets that are tough enough to hold up to the forces.

I think even the killing effect we see from light skinned heavy, high BC bullets comes from the unglueing effect of high RPMs shredding stuff as expansion occurs.

I can’t say for absolute certain it makes kills faster but I’ve seen some great and fast kills with fast twist barrels and good Bullets. I know it doesn’t kill slower.

175 Woodleighs 8 twist 3090 FPS


132 BBC 3600 FPS 8 twist





I can’t see those petals hanging off not destroying a lot of tissue on their way through.

I have an old 6.5 X 54 Mannlicher-Shoenauer, and I've read that one of the things that made this little carbine such a wicked killer was the fast rotation rate of the bullet as it penetrates through the animal. You can see by the way the shards of copper jacket fold back at a sharper angle that it was turning faster on the way through, but I don't see how that could contribute to more tissue damage. I think it's more the fact that the long 160-grain bullets penetrate so well that makes it a superior killer. I sure won't argue that rapid rotation may be a way for a smaller bullet to tear a bigger hole. I haven't shot a bunch of animals with this gun to comment from personal experience, so I'm happy to take your story to heart. Heart of deer, heart of elk, etc.
 

41mag

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Old Bullets OK,

Sheesh I sure hope so, most of what I shoot is a minimum of a decade old, and some back to 50+yrs.

I wish I had a bunch of the Nosler 257 100gr solid bases. Those were a great killing bullet from my 257wby. Anyone have a bunch let me know.

Ditto on the Solid Bases, only 120s in .257, or any others that someone might want to unload. I loved that bullet and still have and hunt with some in calibers ranging from .243 up to .308.

Also have some boxes of the machine turned Partitions, Zepedo, and a few others that will someday go to the grandsons.
 
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