Official Hammer bullets Terminal Performance (picture heavy)

Mike from Texas

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Mike you need too figure out at what point is bc going too off set the velocity gain you get with a lighter hammer bullet and also knowing the hammer bullet will have a wider range of terminal performance impact velocity wise
Understood. They are advertised at .166 BC. Based off the short range velocity measurement I got from the LabRadar, they are shedding velocity quickly.

I’ll be interested to do a drop chart with them against a much slower albeit much higher BC bullet just for comparison.
 

Mike from Texas

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Get some Hammers, If you don't like them I'll buy them from you
I’ve already bought several variants, mainly in 6.5mm. 97 Absolutes, 99 hunter, 109 absolutes, 110 hunter, 123 absolutes. In .308 I currently have loaded up for ladder testing 151 absolutes, 152 hunter, 160 hunter and 162 absolutes.

So I’ve tried several. What I haven’t been able to do so far is shoot them at extended distances to verify long range drops. So far I've only shot them out to 250 and advertised BC seems reasonably close. But they are noticeably lower than other bullets in the same weight class.

Merely my observation and experience. I know lots of people here like them and I don’t dislike them but I don’t understand why the BC is so much lower. Is it the shape of the meplat?
 

Hard rock

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I’ve already bought several variants, mainly in 6.5mm. 97 Absolutes, 99 hunter, 109 absolutes, 110 hunter, 123 absolutes. In .308 I currently have loaded up for ladder testing 151 absolutes, 152 hunter, 160 hunter and 162 absolutes.

So I’ve tried several. What I haven’t been able to do so far is shoot them at extended distances to verify long range drops. So far I've only shot them out to 250 and advertised BC seems reasonably close. But they are noticeably lower than other bullets in the same weight class.

Merely my observation and experience. I know lots of people here like them and I don’t dislike them but I don’t understand why the BC is so much lower. Is it the shape of the meplat?
Monos are going too have a lower bc because lead is denser than copper that’s why you go too a lighter bullet when shooting a mono you have vel gain and more weight retention a 123 gr hammer is aslong if not longer than a 140 gr cup and core bullet hope my explanation clarifies
 

Mike from Texas

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Monos are going too have a lower bc because lead is denser than copper that’s why you go too a lighter bullet when shooting a mono you have vel gain and more weight retention a 123 gr hammer is aslong if not longer than a 140 gr cup and core bullet hope my explanation clarifies
I understand that but other mono bullets in the same weight class have much higher BC; for example 6.5mm 125 Badlands Bulldozer has an advertised G7 BC of .302, Cayuga 122 grain has G7 BC of .280 and Cutting Edge 125 tipped have a BC of .243-.269. The 123 Absolute for example Has an advertised BC of .229 and the 124 Hunter has advertised BC of .245 which is closed in line.

It could very well be others claims are inflated, the badlands seems inflated to me for example.
 

ButterBean

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I understand that but other mono bullets in the same weight class have much higher BC; for example 6.5mm 125 Badlands Bulldozer has an advertised G7 BC of .302, Cayuga 122 grain has G7 BC of .280 and Cutting Edge 125 tipped have a BC of .243-.269. The 123 Absolute for example Has an advertised BC of .229 and the 124 Hunter has advertised BC of .245 which is closed in line.

It could very well be others claims are inflated, the badlands seems inflated to me for example.
Could Be, at the distances your shooting, you are worrying too much about BC IMO
 

codyadams

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I understand that but other mono bullets in the same weight class have much higher BC; for example 6.5mm 125 Badlands Bulldozer has an advertised G7 BC of .302, Cayuga 122 grain has G7 BC of .280 and Cutting Edge 125 tipped have a BC of .243-.269. The 123 Absolute for example Has an advertised BC of .229 and the 124 Hunter has advertised BC of .245 which is closed in line.

It could very well be others claims are inflated, the badlands seems inflated to me for example.
In my testing the Badlands the bc's have been very close, similar to Bergers as far as how little adjustment has been needed. That is using the .277 140, the .338 270, and the .338 250, so only 3 of them, but those three were very good.

I would guess the reasoning would be the bearing surface combined with the large hollow point that is required for consistent expansion, because the bullets are otherwise very sleek. They tend to have a lot of bands, that is not going to help bc. The Badlands for example, have 1 or 2 generally, and they are slower in their angles, not so abrupt.

I generally use hammers in my sub 500 yard guns, and higher bc bullets for my others. It is not uncommon during our elk hunting to need to take shots from 800 to over 1000, and wind is ever present, so bc matters in that range. In closer however, the difference is small enough that going for a MPB zero and having the ability to hold on fur and send it makes up for a little more wind drift, and also having confidence in the terminal performance is a great thing too.
 

Mike from Texas

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In my testing the Badlands the bc's have been very close, similar to Bergers as far as how little adjustment has been needed. That is using the .277 140, the .338 270, and the .338 250, so only 3 of them, but those three were very good.

I would guess the reasoning would be the bearing surface combined with the large hollow point that is required for consistent expansion, because the bullets are otherwise very sleek. They tend to have a lot of bands, that is not going to help bc. The Badlands for example, have 1 or 2 generally, and they are slower in their angles, not so abrupt.

I generally use hammers in my sub 500 yard guns, and higher bc bullets for my others. It is not uncommon during our elk hunting to need to take shots from 800 to over 1000, and wind is ever present, so bc matters in that range. In closer however, the difference is small enough that going for a MPB zero and having the ability to hold on fur and send it makes up for a little more wind drift, and also having confidence in the terminal performance is a great thing too.
That’s good to hear about the Badlands because I have some inbound to try out in 125 grain 6.5mm and 175 grain + 150 grain .308.

I also have some more 109 & 123 grain Hammer Absolutes inbound to continue testing in the Grendel, 6.5x47, 260AI & 6.5-284.
 
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