Now this is exciting for Colorado guys

ENCORE

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
1,188
Location
Near a lake with no fish
Muzzleloader and archery seasons were meant to be primitive weapons seasons....we just keep getting further and further away from that....IMHO.
There's a lot more involved than primitive today. It mostly revolves around money, plus major changes in young hunters. Asking a new hunter to hunt with a flintlock, is like asking him to put down his smart phone and use a rotary.
The day of primitive shooter, agree or not, is slowly passing. Huge arguments over modern inline muzzleloaders within the NMLRA, caused complete ciaos. Now, the NMLRA has many different aggs for modern inline rifles.
One thing that seems to never fail, is that even when someone is asking about information on a modern inline, some always brings up primitive. No disrespect intended at all.
All one has to do with these youngsters, is to let them run their course, then at some point introduce them to primitive rifles, rather that be flint or percussion. You'll find them interested in primitive rifles and many may decide they'd like to know more.
 

ENCORE

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
1,188
Location
Near a lake with no fish
I agree with you Encore. I am happy to say that our local ML Club is seeing lots more younger shooters. There is hope.
Yes sir.
I've seen it over and over again, youngsters want the latest and greatest. No problem with that. But once they get involved and notice what a good marksman can do with a flint or percussion, it peeks their interest.
I always say, get them started and started correctly first, then once you've noticed their interest, introduce them to the old ways. It sometimes amazes me how quickly some will want a new flint or percussion.
A really great friend of mine, also a NMLRA member, teaches many kids shooting both flint and percussion rifles. He's what I call a dandy shooter too. He has shot 5X at 50yds OFF HAND! I can't do that with my custom off a bench ;)

I always say, help everyone in any way you can. Our beloved sport needs new shooters/hunters in this day and age.
 

Buckys

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
224
Location
Allen, Tejas
The move to modern weapons is primarily driven by financial related concerns but it is likely reinforced by the fact that it increases hunter participation, especially younger hunters. Homo sapien is the top of the food chain because of its ability to use tools to kill at a distance. I like being at the top of the food chain and personally I'm in favor of getting better at what got us there.

That being said, I also enjoy the experience of a broad array of opportunities to hunt and probably enjoy the more primitive methods the most. That being said, most of the meat in the freezer was harvested with bolt action rifles (in other words, I suck at primitive hunting but love trying anyway).

I feel like the bigger issue is a lack of young hunters in general. Personally, my concern is to get more young hunters and develop their ability to hunt safely as well as ethically/humanely. If they can demonstrate that they can do so at a 1000+ yards, 500 yards, 100 yards, whatever is not something that keeps me up at night.

I will use the best tool for any given season and set of rules that I'm given. I don't have a flintlock, long bow, adze nor do I own an AR or crossbow. I hunt large game with my compound bow (and my recurve if the rules limit me to do so), 209 inline muzzleloader with scope (which will be converted to a red dot soon) and arsenal of bolt-action rifles.

I don't use a long bow because I almost always hunt from an elevated tree stand for archery and prefer to shortest tip-to-tip weapon I can use, preferably with a mechanical release as I know it maximizes my chance to kill humanely when I am archery hunting. That being said, I don't own a crossbow because I feel like I'm proficient enough with a compound bow and the best opportunities that I have for archery hunting do not allow crossbows yet. And if the opportunities I wanted were only available to recurve and longbow hunters, I would hunt my recurve. And once the best opportunities allow x-bows I will likely switch if for no other reason than that I will be too old to draw a 70# compound bow ;-)

I don't use a flintlock or percussion cap inline rifle because I started muzzleloader hunting after the 209's started to dominate that market. I will go to a red dot because I don't expect anything >150yds to be more likely than the opportunities I get <25-50yds where a scope becomes a hindrance and vastly increases my ability to make a mistake. So, for me personally, I know it maximizes my chance to kill humanely when I am ML hunting. I don't personally have an interest to take up flintlocks but I'm sure I would enjoy shooting one.

For me, the non-intuitive part of the luminescent rule for Colorado ML is I feel like fluorescent paint, fiber optics, red dots and illuminated reticles allow ethical hunters to maximize their ability to kill humanely at first/last legal hunting light. I'm not sure if the rule in Colorado is driven by folks not observing first/last legal hunting light, fear that it will motivate more folks to shoot at first/last legal hunting light (for me, this is not intuitive ... most people who are willing to push their luck don't need much of an excuse, they are going to do it anyway) or possibly it is not primitive enough (which I am completely fine with ... but that they also scopes but not fluorescent paint, fiber optics seems backwards in that regard). But I will be more than happy to follow that rule if I ever get the opportunity to ML hunt in Colorado.

I would love to be educated on the motivation for that rule in Colorado. We certainly have our fair share of non-intuitive hunting rules in Texas that need lots of explanation ... aerial and night time hunting of feral hogs (because they will drive deer to extinction left unchecked here), baiting with timed feeders, open seasons on exotic (non-native) animals, etc.

For the record, I fall in the 50-55 yr age bracket and I started thinking about myself as an old dude shortly after I ascended to that rank :)
 

ENCORE

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
1,188
Location
Near a lake with no fish
I started in 1973 with a Huntsman, which I could have cared less for. Moved on to percussion rifles, both the original CVA (prior to BPI) and TC. Took many a mid-west whitetail with percussion rifles. I've shot flints, just never cared for them.
When Knight first came out, I pondered around, then finally purchased an MK85. Really liked the change and again, took more than my share of whitetails with that rifle. However, once TC came out with the Encore, that rifle suited me perfectly. Easy to modify, accurate as all get out. Not sure how many Encore platform rifles I've owned, but it was quite a few. A couple nephews were given rifles when I replaced them with newer models.
Gave up the Encore platform rifles, mostly because I wanted more of what they couldn't give me. Range. I had been completely infected with long range shooting. I purchased a BP Xpress from Ultimate Firearms, which I shot until I'd gotten all that was possible from that rifle, so then there was just one more step left.... complete custom.
Not everyone will get bitten by the long range bug, but those who do, love it.

For the record: 68 years young :)
 

Buckys

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
224
Location
Allen, Tejas
The Walmart near Wasatch in Utah always carried ML supplies as well. Might be a Colorado thing? Much more liberal than many other states in the Rockies...
 

AP218

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 27, 2012
Messages
86
The fury star tip2 50 cal mz bullets worked well for me. I used the 325gn version and blackhorn 209 powder. I am a novice with open sights but they shot accurately out to 200 yards which is as far as I tried to shoot. I ended up killing a bull elk last fall at 150 yards. Shot was in the
 

dodgefreak8

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2005
Messages
288
Location
Fort Morgan, Colorado
just wanted to update this thread and get it back on track..

Here are the ballistics of the 325gr 50cal powerbelt elr bullets from the cva paramount pro colorado.

He's pushing them 2408fps with 170gr by volume/ 119gr by weight of bh209

You guys can hunt with smooth bore flintlock muzzleloaders all you want. No offense intended. I'll be grabbing one of these when they're released.
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20200615-184935_Facebook.jpg
    Screenshot_20200615-184935_Facebook.jpg
    235.8 KB · Views: 92

ENCORE

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
1,188
Location
Near a lake with no fish
just wanted to update this thread and get it back on track..

Here are the ballistics of the 325gr 50cal powerbelt elr bullets from the cva paramount pro colorado.

He's pushing them 2408fps with 170gr by volume/ 119gr by weight of bh209

You guys can hunt with smooth bore flintlock muzzleloaders all you want. No offense intended. I'll be grabbing one of these when they're released.
His drops are more accurate now than his first published drops. Glad that he re-shot for actual drops.
 

jasonco

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2009
Messages
1,403
Location
Colorado

Recent Posts

Top