Nosler or Bergara problems

SammySTW

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I hate to say it, but this is NOT unusual.
Ammo makers use whatever powder they have on hand that gives them their desired ballistics, so different powders definitely get used and ammo from one line MAY get mixed up with ammo from another line.
Working at ADI, I saw the change of powder and it takes several runs before the entire line is on the same powder.
The computer operating the system knows when the lines are flushed and starts dispensing the new charge weight and powder. So some cartridges prior to this are still on the line for boxing ahead of the newer dispensed rounds, so I can see how it happens.
That ball powder in the video is most likely bulk powder 789. Very common factory powder. The stick powder looks like bulk 4831.

Cheers.
I think he said he had a very big velocity change, and that's what led him to pull bullets and check charges. And they also had different brass. I understand why they might need to use different powders, but how does it end up in the same lot, and in the same box?
 

MagnumManiac

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Exactly how I outlined in my post.
They don’t exactly stop the line, the rounds ahead are still travelling to bullet seating/crimping and then onto a hopper before being boxed.

Cheers.
 

xsn10s

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Ejector marks are raised, think the tight fit caused over pressure?
Normally I would say that's a sign of high pressures. But the primers aren't flattened and and have a good radius on the edge. So without being there to feel how the bolt is closing I cannot say. It could be a tight chamber. Or something could be holding off the boltface, like a burr or an extractor issue. That's why I'd contact both Nosler and Bergara. I'm sure both companies will take care of you.
 

Mogollon Hunter

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Called Bergara stateside and was told to check the torque on my optic rail screws. Called nosler and they are willing to exchange it for me. He said that rifles from across the pond often have minimum saami spec on the chamber and that ammo from a different lot usually solves the issue. Kind of hesitant to send it back though as I could just disassemble, resize, and reload with the berger 184s that I have.
 

MagnumManiac

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Lot numbers tell the manufacturer the date of when it was made.
It doesn’t tell them that a case from a different run got through.
Nothing on a process line is infallible.

Cheers.
 

xsn10s

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Called Bergara stateside and was told to check the torque on my optic rail screws. Called nosler and they are willing to exchange it for me. He said that rifles from across the pond often have minimum saami spec on the chamber and that ammo from a different lot usually solves the issue. Kind of hesitant to send it back though as I could just disassemble, resize, and reload with the berger 184s that I have.
I'd check rail mount screws like Bergara said. Normally if at home I like taking the firing pin assembly out of my rifles while running live ammo though the action as a safety precaution. If not possible then I'd wait until I'm at the range to do so. If it were me I'd take off the rail and then run the ammo through the rifle again to see if you still got the hard bolt close. Not knowing where the exact location of the rail screws are I'm guessing Bergara is thinking a screw is contacting the bolt head or even slightly bending the action. Checking the torque on the screws will help rule out the bending of the action. Taking the raill screws out will even further rule out any contact of screws or bending of the action. I'd then check the boltface and extractor to make sure the cartridge can fully seat on the bolt. And lastly I'd check the ejector plunger by pushing in on it to see if it allows the cartridge to fully seat on the boltface. I hope that helps.
 

SammySTW

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I'd check rail mount screws like Bergara said. Normally if at home I like taking the firing pin assembly out of my rifles while running live ammo though the action as a safety precaution. If not possible then I'd wait until I'm at the range to do so. If it were me I'd take off the rail and then run the ammo through the rifle again to see if you still got the hard bolt close. Not knowing where the exact location of the rail screws are I'm guessing Bergara is thinking a screw is contacting the bolt head or even slightly bending the action. Checking the torque on the screws will help rule out the bending of the action. Taking the raill screws out will even further rule out any contact of screws or bending of the action. I'd then check the boltface and extractor to make sure the cartridge can fully seat on the bolt. And lastly I'd check the ejector plunger by pushing in on it to see if it allows the cartridge to fully seat on the boltface. I hope that helps.
If it's a tight bolt on some rounds and easy on others, and easy when cycling empty, I think you could rule out the rail screws and torque as a factor. But those are good things to be aware of
 
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