New to long range shooting

MH90

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2012
Messages
9
i'm new to long range shooting and i have a winchester model 70 in .270win. Is this a good starting point? any advice will help
 

junkpile

Active Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
29
Location
Menomonie, WI
That's a wide open question. Depends on what you think long range is, for starters, but you should be in good condition.

If you look through the articles, you can find one on using a 270 for long range. Could be of interest to you.

What kind of range are you currently dealing with, and how far are you wanting to stretch out?

Bottom line with all of this is that you need to shoot a lot at the ranges you want to be proficient at. Do you reload?
 

MH90

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2012
Messages
9
I just started getting into this, i plan to reload but havent started yet. i'm wanting to get the maximum range i can out of my old deer hunting rifle before i buy a better long range rifle.
 

junkpile

Active Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
29
Location
Menomonie, WI
I'm not going to get into how far I think you should shoot with a 270. And you'll get varying opinions on it when people do start talking.


270 Win For Long Range Shooting

How far are you shooting right now? What kind of groups are you getting at that range? And how far do you want to shoot?
 

azsugarbear

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2005
Messages
1,360
Location
Central AZ
MH90,

Just be sure you go into this with your eyes wide open. This can become an expensive past time real quick.

First - you will want to spend a few $$$ to "accurize" you Win. model 70 to get your groups a little tighter.

Then you will find out you need a decent rangefinder to better calculate the distance to your targets.

Next comes a ballistic app to better determine your dial-ups and windage.

Only then do you realize that your scope does not track well or return to your zero - so a new, better scope is in order.

Finally, you realize the shortcommings of your current rifle and caliber, so you start a custom build in one of those big magnum cartridges.

Once your custom build is done, you spend more $$$ for some reloading equipment for better, more consistent accuracy and to keep your ammunition costs down.

Now you realize that your targets aren't holding up to all the battering they receive, so you need to buy some AR500 steel targets.

Then you start hitting targets way out there....but miss once in a while. Then the idea pops into your head: "if only I had...." and the process repeats itself.

It is a slippery slope my friend. :)
 

nddodd

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2005
Messages
1,413
Location
Murray, Ky.
MH90,

Just be sure you go into this with your eyes wide open. This can become an expensive past time real quick.

First - you will want to spend a few $$$ to "accurize" you Win. model 70 to get your groups a little tighter.

Then you will find out you need a decent rangefinder to better calculate the distance to your targets.

Next comes a ballistic app to better determine your dial-ups and windage.

Only then do you realize that your scope does not track well or return to your zero - so a new, better scope is in order.

Finally, you realize the shortcommings of your current rifle and caliber, so you start a custom build in one of those big magnum cartridges.

Once your custom build is done, you spend more $$$ for some reloading equipment for better, more consistent accuracy and to keep your ammunition costs down.

Now you realize that your targets aren't holding up to all the battering they receive, so you need to buy some AR500 steel targets.

Then you start hitting targets way out there....but miss once in a while. Then the idea pops into your head: "if only I had...." and the process repeats itself.

It is a slippery slope my friend. :)


+1 what he said, in all seriousness it is very much like this. In order to be proficient at any range you need to shoot, shoot, shoot and shoot some more. It is like anything else you want to be good at you have to practice alot. Its getting more and more expensive too. The first thing i did when i got into this sport was buy my reloading components, dies, scales, press, powder, primers, bullets, and a couple of reloading manuals. Find a bullet you want to try and load some cases. I started at 200 yards and didnt leave tell i felt extremely comfortable in my ability, trigger control, cheek weld, and consistent grip of the gun. Dont get to excited about groups at 100 yards either ive seen guns shoot a ragid hole at 100 then be embarrasing at 200.

Main thing is good optics, you have to know when you dial up, down, left, or right its goin to do what you want it too. I absolutely love shooting, theres nothing else id rather do, its a very addictive sport.

There are a ton of people on here who will help you, if i knew any loads for your caliber id help you there but ive never owned one. Im sure someone will come on here thatll help you in that department.


Nathan
 

FEENIX

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2008
Messages
15,222
Location
Great Falls, MT
MH90,

Just be sure you go into this with your eyes wide open. This can become an expensive past time real quick.

First - you will want to spend a few $$$ to "accurize" you Win. model 70 to get your groups a little tighter.

Then you will find out you need a decent rangefinder to better calculate the distance to your targets.

Next comes a ballistic app to better determine your dial-ups and windage.

Only then do you realize that your scope does not track well or return to your zero - so a new, better scope is in order.

Finally, you realize the shortcommings of your current rifle and caliber, so you start a custom build in one of those big magnum cartridges.

Once your custom build is done, you spend more $$$ for some reloading equipment for better, more consistent accuracy and to keep your ammunition costs down.

Now you realize that your targets aren't holding up to all the battering they receive, so you need to buy some AR500 steel targets.

Then you start hitting targets way out there....but miss once in a while. Then the idea pops into your head: "if only I had...." and the process repeats itself.

It is a slippery slope my friend. :)

+1! Don't forget the chrony too! Someone will tell you that you'll need more than one in your set-up, otherwise it's nothing but a guess. :rolleyes:

Success doesn't happen overnight, but the bottom-line, don't let all of these discourage you, go for it and enjoy! Happy safe shooting/hunting and welcome to LRH.
 

WildRose

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
12,075
Location
N. Texas and S. Africa
I just started getting into this, i plan to reload but havent started yet. i'm wanting to get the maximum range i can out of my old deer hunting rifle before i buy a better long range rifle.
The model 70 is a great action so don't think you "need" to go buy something else to start over with when you've pretty well gotten all you can from it.

Just send it off to the gunsmith of your choice or directly to one of the barrel manufacturers and have them rebarrel it in the caliber of your choice.

Of course being a Mod 70 the 300wm would be a very logical step up the pole.

Get with a competent gunsmith, see if you can find a shooting partner that's got some real experience beyond 300yds.

Have the gunsmith do a basic accurizing job on what you have, a good trigger job, and then get out and shoot it.

If you can get to where you are shooting consistently 1" or smaller groups at 100yds, you can start moving out with confidence.

Also read all you can here and don't be afraid to ask questions. Most of us have already made every mistake that can be made so folks like you can learn from our experiences both good and bad to save yourself aggravation and help you along in the process.

Fortunately some of the High BC bullet MFG's are starting to take .270 shooters seriously so their are now some really good bullett choices for you as well.

As the others have said, this is addicting, and every bit of success you have will hook you even deeper.

Welcome to the addiction.
 

stvnbrg

Active Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2012
Messages
29
MH90,

Just be sure you go into this with your eyes wide open. This can become an expensive past time real quick.

First - you will want to spend a few $$$ to "accurize" you Win. model 70 to get your groups a little tighter.

Then you will find out you need a decent rangefinder to better calculate the distance to your targets.

Next comes a ballistic app to better determine your dial-ups and windage.

Only then do you realize that your scope does not track well or return to your zero - so a new, better scope is in order.

Finally, you realize the shortcommings of your current rifle and caliber, so you start a custom build in one of those big magnum cartridges.

Once your custom build is done, you spend more $$$ for some reloading equipment for better, more consistent accuracy and to keep your ammunition costs down.

Now you realize that your targets aren't holding up to all the battering they receive, so you need to buy some AR500 steel targets.

Then you start hitting targets way out there....but miss once in a while. Then the idea pops into your head: "if only I had...." and the process repeats itself.

It is a slippery slope my friend. :)

All these things are very true! but thats why this is such an awesome hobby because The sky is the limit!! There is no top to achieve, its a lifelong journey! you dont need a ton of money to get into it,but as your skill and inevitably your interest level increase, so will the need for new and more capable equipment. IMO its a good idea to start with the less expensive equipment for 2 reasons. 1) it keeps the wife at bay 2) increases the learning curve when skill level grows, as you become aware of why the more expensive equipment is more capable. Thats just my opinion, some say buy the best right away. Lets just say your in for a heck of an obsession!
 

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