New rifle...... Flinching

Willys

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2020
Messages
20
Location
Oregon
We shoot 338-378 with 300 gr smk at 1000 at 2870 fps. 112.4 to 113 gr Rl33. Virgin brass.
Gen 3 lil fat bast*d brake, 1st 6 holes open. Slip on gel pad on stock from amazon.

33db muffs. Firm hold on stock - pull butt into your shoulder.

6” groups at 1000 are possible.

Doubt you get there without bedding.
 

Its204fast

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Joined
May 20, 2020
Messages
70
Location
North Carolina
I used to flinch and have made a lot of effort to stop, Like Critter said, have someone load a fired case in with the mix to make you aware of it. Doubling the ear pro helps, dry firing helps tons. I shoot a .204 Ruger and 7mm Rem mag. I like to start with the .204 then switch to the 7mm it takes the edge off from expecting the recoil. Having a good fitted stock helps. Keep your scope as far from your face as you can (depending on eye relief) relax and squeeze the trigger like you have no idea when its going to fire. DONT drink COFFEE or energy drinks before shooting... i wasted a trip to the range one day because of that. everytime my heart would beat i would shake the gun.

I don't flinch but still close my eyes when I fire. I havent figured out how to stop that.... been thinging about drinking a single beer to relax me before I shoot. (only at my personal range)
 

cabelasken

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Joined
Feb 22, 2021
Messages
101
Location
Nevada
the blast from a muzzle break can be a problem as I hate to sit next to someone that has a big boomer and is using one of the 90 degree angled ones. In addition to plugs and muffs which I always wear at the range, I sometimes will stuff a little cotton ball up each nostril which seems to minimizes some of muzzle bast.
 

dukxdog

Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2012
Messages
20
Cigarette butts might work better. Or put a set of ear plugs in your nose. Haha! Funny things one hears on this forum!
 

Radman

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Joined
Nov 23, 2019
Messages
219
Location
TN
So I have been shooting practically my whole life. I consider myself a pretty fair shot. Last year I decided I wanna shoot farther. I'm hunting elk and I had been shooting 500 yards. Now I wanna shoot out to 1000 yards. Sounds simple right...??? Well I've got a huge education. Lol. So last year I started shooting with a good buddy who has been shooting long range for a while and he gets me hitting at 1000 pretty consistent. I was shooting a 300 RUM with 180 grain barnes bullets. After doing some research I see I'm shooting 775 ft lbs at 1000. I wanna be at least 1000 ft lbs. So I buy some 190 grain barnes LR bullets that's supposed to get me over the 1000 ft lbs. Problem is I haven't got a muzzle brake, so 180 grains have little recoil but 190's kick like a mule! I decided to buy a new rifle with a brake. I ordered a Weatherby 338-378. Sweet rifle! Now the problem is I am flinching BAD! The gun doesn't kick that bad, I think it's the brake messing with me. I never owned a gun with a brake before and it's different. With the price and availability of ammo I'm not sure what to do to quit wasting it. I can't even see what powder charge shoots best cause I can't shoot a group. Definitely not the gun it's just I'm a head case behind it. I'm not afraid of it, I'm just not sure why I'm doing it. Anyone have any ideas or pointers to help me out? Anything is much appreciated.
I know that it's expensive & frustrating but I've seen this several times. Lots of good advice here, especially blocking the volume of the blast all that you can. Some have said to shoot smaller caliber rifles. My suggestion is to take multiple smaller rifles on range day & keep swapping them all out. IF you have the recoil tamed then it is psychological - but that can be a bear to tame, (no matter how tough or macho the shooter). Good luck. You'll do it. (That IS a lot of rifle!)
 

rcs33

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2021
Messages
7
Location
colorado
An effective muzzle brake remains the best device in the reduction of felt recoil and reduction of muzzle rise.

It might take time getting used to.
Agreed. I know what those cartridges cost (i shoot a 340 wtby) but going back to basics and practicing are the only sure-fire tricks i know of— but i bet you already know that.
 

Gater

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Joined
Aug 19, 2019
Messages
317
Location
Home
So I have been shooting practically my whole life. I consider myself a pretty fair shot. Last year I decided I wanna shoot farther. I'm hunting elk and I had been shooting 500 yards. Now I wanna shoot out to 1000 yards. Sounds simple right...??? Well I've got a huge education. Lol. So last year I started shooting with a good buddy who has been shooting long range for a while and he gets me hitting at 1000 pretty consistent. I was shooting a 300 RUM with 180 grain barnes bullets. After doing some research I see I'm shooting 775 ft lbs at 1000. I wanna be at least 1000 ft lbs. So I buy some 190 grain barnes LR bullets that's supposed to get me over the 1000 ft lbs. Problem is I haven't got a muzzle brake, so 180 grains have little recoil but 190's kick like a mule! I decided to buy a new rifle with a brake. I ordered a Weatherby 338-378. Sweet rifle! Now the problem is I am flinching BAD! The gun doesn't kick that bad, I think it's the brake messing with me. I never owned a gun with a brake before and it's different. With the price and availability of ammo I'm not sure what to do to quit wasting it. I can't even see what powder charge shoots best cause I can't shoot a group. Definitely not the gun it's just I'm a head case behind it. I'm not afraid of it, I'm just not sure why I'm doing it. Anyone have any ideas or pointers to help me out? Anything is much appreciated.
When you practice have your buddy load or not load your gun so you won’t know if it’s live or dry fire
 

Bdubose

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Joined
Feb 23, 2018
Messages
61
Location
Texas
I shoot a RUM with a break and it was the cure for my flinching.
Shooting a big gun without a break will definitely teach you bad habits!
Like everyone else said - dry fire and small calibers while working on fundamentals will solve it.
Like I was told "If you can't see the impact of your round you cannot shoot long range consistently!"
When we shoot the big guns with breaks EVERYONE wears plugs AND muffs - Double up!
 

bigdogone

Active Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2020
Messages
35
Location
Dallas
Double hearing protection. In-ear foam or custom molded and over ear muffs. The highest NR reduction you can find. Lot's of dry fire to get rid of flinch. You don't want to groove that.
 

orifdoc

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Joined
Aug 2, 2020
Messages
97
Location
Idaho
Lunacy.

Any flinch, even a small one, will be 100 times worse than any small gain you're hoping to get in a down-range energy. Some people can reliably put lethal hits on elk-size vital zones at 1000 yards. Most people can't. NOBODY can if they flinch. Chose a different gun, limit your shots to 800 yards, get a suppressor (absolute magic in my book), or pick something in the 6.5 to 7mm class. I personally hate muzzle brakes and the blast bothers me as much or more than the shove/kick. You can overcome a flinch in a hard-hitting rifle, but it's difficult and it takes TONS of commitment and dedication. Far easier to chose something you enjoy shooting.
 

fmuguira

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Joined
Nov 6, 2010
Messages
508
+1 double hearing protection. I m old school/guy, if I get the Hebie Jeebies from my rifle/cartridge then I believe a smaller cartridge that you re comfortable with is the solution. As Lance mentioned there’s lots of cartridges that will get efficiently to 1000 yards. Use a high BC bullet and you ll be shocked at the retained energy!!

Good luck👍
 

Greta06

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Joined
Dec 19, 2018
Messages
125
Location
Pa
Muzzlebrakes are horrible, the concussion alone can give you headache after multiple shots. None of my guns have one on the them, except for the 50 bmg of course. Do yourself a favor and just buy a suppressor, guaranteed your flinch will be gone. They are a dream to shoot with compared to the alternative...
 
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