New rifle...... Flinching

Gundog74

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Yes-I guess there are drawbacks to most everything. It was fun to shoot long range and you could watch your hit. But it was no fun carrying to the bench. Stock was a H50 McMillan. Gunsmith showed me his and so I ordered mine also with optional lead filled. Stock weighed 34lbs and barreled action weighed 22lbs.(2" barrel with 2" Bat action.) Will not do that again lol
WOW
 

Canhunter35

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Jun 13, 2017
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Many years ago I struggled with anticipating the shot, I’d push my shoulder into butt.
Dry firing is great, along with every mild recoiling rifle, subsonic ammo from 22lr is quite susceptible to improper shooting techniques.
I ring steel well past 1k with my 6mm. Maybe work back up to the cannons, I also think long range cannons start at 15lbs and are braked, but that’s my opinion. I use a 7rem mag, weighs 14lbs, it’s great for long range hunting
 

JTH

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Not all suppressors and muzzle brakes are created equal, so YMMV. I am a big fan of suppressors, but it does not reduce felt recoil or muzzle rise as well as an effective muzzle brake.

Going from a brake to a suppressor shrunk my groups noticeably. For me, the recoil reduction was still very adequate, and the lower volume of sound was a huge improvement. I think the bang can be more disruptive than the recoil on large magnums with brakes. I’ve got a Silencerco Harvester and Omega, and both are very effective.
 

Hand Skills

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Dry firing won't help a flinch ever! As long as one knows there is no round in the chamber why would you ever flinch...it's anticipation of recoil that produces flinching.....mind over matter or OP.....drop to a realistic weapon you can handle and build up to those you can't...if you ever can!

You must have missed the part where I said 'lots'.

I like light rifles, and I don't like brakes... So I get beat up sometimes. I could go on, but I think Darrel Holland said it best in the article linked below.

Maybe I'm misunderstanding you, but your contribution above reads like you may have confused your 'opinion' with 'fact'!

 

FEENIX

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Going from a brake to a suppressor shrunk my groups noticeably. For me, the recoil reduction was still very adequate, and the lower volume of sound was a huge improvement. I think the bang can be more disruptive than the recoil on large magnums with brakes. I’ve got a Silencerco Harvester and Omega, and both are very effective.
I am not disputing the reduction is not adequate, I just do not want the OP to be misled and expect the same recoil reduction as an effective MB.
 

JTH

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10-4 Feenix, I’m in agreement. I grew up shooting a Remington 870 with 3“ rifled slugs, which kicked harder than the 10 pound 375 H &H I had in my twenties. Never had a problem with the recoil. If you’re not particularly recoil sensitive, when shooting big magnums with brakes, I truly think the bang is far more disruptive and causes more flinch in anticipation than the recoil, but that’s just me. Added advantage when hunting with a suppressor is you’re not destroying your hearing. (I’ve never seen anyone wearing hearing protection in the field ) 😊
 

WYO300RUM

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Yes-I guess there are drawbacks to most everything. It was fun to shoot long range and you could watch your hit. But it was no fun carrying to the bench. Stock was a H50 McMillan. Gunsmith showed me his and so I ordered mine also with optional lead filled. Stock weighed 34lbs and barreled action weighed 22lbs.(2" barrel with 2" Bat action.) Will not do that again lol
WOW !!! I've never heard of that weight . Bet it barely moved !
 

FEENIX

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10-4 Feenix, I’m in agreement. I grew up shooting a Remington 870 with 3“ rifled slugs, which kicked harder than the 10 pound 375 H &H I had in my twenties. Never had a problem with the recoil. If you’re not particularly recoil sensitive, when shooting big magnums with brakes, I truly think the bang is far more disruptive and causes more flinch in anticipation than the recoil, but that’s just me. Added advantage when hunting with a suppressor is you’re not destroying your hearing. (I’ve never seen anyone wearing hearing protection in the field ) 😊
I worked in the flighline working F-4s and A-10s in my first 10 years in the USAF. 10-14 hours of exposure to high dBs is the norm, so I learn to protect my hearing very well. Today, I am one of those people that wear PPEs when operating the mower, snow machine, chain saw, trimmer, and other machines that generate high noise levels other than firearms. Firearms are not the only thing you need to protect your hearing from, just saying.

noise-levels.png
 

xsn10s

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I worked in the flighline working F-4s and A-10s in my first 10 years in the USAF. 10-14 hours of exposure to high dBs is the norm, so I learn to protect my hearing very well. Today, I am one of those people that wear PPEs when operating the mower, snow machine, chain saw, trimmer, and other machines that generate high noise levels other than firearms. Firearms are not the only thing you need to protect your hearing from, just saying.

View attachment 279670
My hearing damage came from M1 Abrams, Bradley, SAW, and pistol training. I can't even hit a nail with a hammer without wearing hearing protection. I forgot artillery.
 

Dentite

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Oct 22, 2014
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Hate to say because they are a pain to get but I love suppressors because they reduce recoil, noise, and blast. I really dislike shooting rifles with brakes and I dislike shooting heavy recoiling rifles with and without brakes.

The only downside to suppressor is the annoying process to get one, the cost, the extra length, and the extra weight.
 

DJ Fergus

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Dec 25, 2015
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So I have been shooting practically my whole life. I consider myself a pretty fair shot. Last year I decided I wanna shoot farther. I'm hunting elk and I had been shooting 500 yards. Now I wanna shoot out to 1000 yards. Sounds simple right...??? Well I've got a huge education. Lol. So last year I started shooting with a good buddy who has been shooting long range for a while and he gets me hitting at 1000 pretty consistent. I was shooting a 300 RUM with 180 grain barnes bullets. After doing some research I see I'm shooting 775 ft lbs at 1000. I wanna be at least 1000 ft lbs. So I buy some 190 grain barnes LR bullets that's supposed to get me over the 1000 ft lbs. Problem is I haven't got a muzzle brake, so 180 grains have little recoil but 190's kick like a mule! I decided to buy a new rifle with a brake. I ordered a Weatherby 338-378. Sweet rifle! Now the problem is I am flinching BAD! The gun doesn't kick that bad, I think it's the brake messing with me. I never owned a gun with a brake before and it's different. With the price and availability of ammo I'm not sure what to do to quit wasting it. I can't even see what powder charge shoots best cause I can't shoot a group. Definitely not the gun it's just I'm a head case behind it. I'm not afraid of it, I'm just not sure why I'm doing it. Anyone have any ideas or pointers to help me out? Anything is much appreciated.
My guess is that the muzzle blast from your 338-378 is horrendous. This is more of a problem for me personally than recoil. It will certainly cause a flinch and it will be hard to get past that with that rifle. I've heard Muscle brakes do well concerning reduced muzzle blast. For now, I would go with a smaller cartridge. You can come back to the 338-378 later or not ever again. I would recommend something from 6.5mm to 7mm.
 

manitou1

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Mar 27, 2012
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Man, a 168 gr Nosler ABLR handload out of my .280 ai will hold 1232 ft lbs at 1000 yards... and no flinching! (26" barrel)
 

SSgt G Cody

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Feb 23, 2020
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Asheville, NC
Most muzzlebrakes are excessively loud and harsh on shooters and all nearby! Most likely you are flinching from the compression and sound wave felt by your eyes, ears, and really whole body. Cover your eyes with good large lens glasses plus a full face shield! Use sponge-type ear plugs plus full ear muffs. Third step is to use heavy coverall-type body cover. This was successful for German forces firing huge artillery in WWII. If this is not succxessful, you will have to step down to a lower power gun/round! But it IS Solvable!!!
 

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