New Rifle .308 or .270

Discussion in 'Member Introductions' started by jmcb210, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. jmcb210

    jmcb210 New Member

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    I am looking at getting a new rifle. I am looking at the Savage 110 HS Precision in a .308 or a Savage 116 Weather Warrior in a .270. Which one will be more accurate at 800 yards. I am planning on using Hornady Sumerformance SST ammo. The .308 drops 190" at 800 yards and the .270 drops 148" at 800 yards. I would think the .270 would be more accurate at this distance because of the drop. But I don't know how much difference a heavy barrel and precision stock make. LEt me know your thoughts and why.
     
  2. Pons

    Pons Well-Known Member

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    With so many options for cartridges, how did you narrow it down to either the .270 or the .308?

    The .308Win in a HS-P stock is a really nice combo. The weather warriors are great as well, in fact I love the rifle for some strange reason. I really am not a big fan of the stock that comes with it, but they are relatively lightweight, easy to work on and mod if desired, and have been good rifles for me.

    The only thing I don't like about the 10 series are they are not stainless. I like hunting a lot, and with different temps and humidity changes I like the piece of mind stainless. It is hard to argue with a good shooting gun, and in my experience, they are that.

    Do you handload? Are you looking at 2 rifles at a good price and trying to decide between the 2? The .270 is a nice hunting round, but I would pick several cartridges before a .270win.

    just curious
     
  3. Derek M.

    Derek M. Well-Known Member

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    You ask the impossible. No one can predict what the actual rifles you purchase will do with any given lot # of factory ammo. Accuracy, precision, and drop are different.

    I have both 270s and 1 308. The 308 is "inherently" more accurate according to many sources. I don't believe it. I'd put my hunting 270s up against my 308 or anyone else's hunting 308 of similar build (barrel length, contour).

    A one hold group or 1/2 MOA is what it is regardless of what rifle and bullet were used.

    I favor the 270 over the 308 hands down.
     
  4. jmcb210

    jmcb210 New Member

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    The reason I am choosing between the .308 and .270 is because both are able to kill a Whitetail deer out to 800 yards with the least amount of felt recoil. Also both have lots of factory ammo available. Unless you get a custom .270, you can not find one with a heavy barrel. I wasn't sure if the heavy barrel on the .308's made much of a difference on accuracy on not. Also if the design of the cartidge made a difference on accuracy.
     
  5. jtkratzer

    jtkratzer Well-Known Member

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    Do you reload? If so, and this is going to primarily be a deer gun, consider something other than those two cartridges. If you want something that's going to minimize drop, while keep recoil manageable and to a minimum, consider the 6.5mm/.264 caliber chamberings - .260 Remington, 6.5x55mm, 6.5 Creedmoor, 6.5x47, 6.5x284, etc. The .260 Remington can be loaded to duplicate the trajectory of the .300 Win Mag and carries more energy and velocity at 1000 yards than .308 with far less drop, something close to or around 3 feet less.

    If you don't reload, the factory ammunition choices for .260 are kind of limited. There were about 4 or 5 choices on the shelf at my local Cabela's when I went in the other night and were pretty much limited to 120 grain or 140 grain. Either will kill deer, but you need to find what works best for your rifle depending on the twist rate, etc. .270 and .308 have far more factory options, but if you want accuracy out that far, you probably should consider reloading, depending on what you consider to be acceptable accuracy.
     
  6. Derek M.

    Derek M. Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the 6.5 suggestion, however, the OP seems to be very interested in factory ammo. To that I recommend steering clear of most 6.5 applications and stick with the 308 or 270 and learn the actual bullet drop. No worries on killing a deer with either beyond what many shooters are capable of consistently.

    Even today, when I go to Bass Pro or Dick's Sporting Goods, I rarely see 260 ammo, and if I do, it is usually close range bullets like the inexpensive Remington core-lokt.
     
  7. Pons

    Pons Well-Known Member

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    That pretty much sums it up.
     
  8. jmcb210

    jmcb210 New Member

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    Let's rephase the question. If I were to hand reload and the .270 regular barrel savage and the .308 heavy barrel savage were my only two options, which one would you choose for a 800 yard shot.
     
  9. jtkratzer

    jtkratzer Well-Known Member

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    Either one is capable, and since you're talking about hunting, the profile of the barrel becomes less significant as you're looking to make first round accurate hits and not as concerned with the barrel heating up due to taking numerous shots at the range.

    The .270 is going to have better ballistics, drop less, and drift less due to the wind when comparing similar bullet weights. Look up Jack O'Connor for all you need to know about the .270. He makes the argument that a 130 grain bullet from a .270 is one of the best combos for deer and you can use heavier bullets for bear.

    .308 is plenty accurate, I just don't think it's the finger of God that some portray it to be.

    Both will have plenty of factory loads available, but if you're going to get into handloading, there are a lot of better choices for deer for those ranges than .270 or .308.
     
  10. Derek M.

    Derek M. Well-Known Member

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    270.

    Though the 308 will work, to me, it's not even part of the equation.

    If Jack O'Connor could see what my 150 VLDs are doing, I'd bet a month's salary he'd give it a whirl.
     
  11. DirtyOldTrix3006

    DirtyOldTrix3006 Member

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    Hello Jmcb210;
    You have chose to decide between two tried and true cartridges and two great factory rifles. Please don't think I am talking down to you as I am just trying to help you achieve your goal. I don't know how much experience you have, so I will include all I can think of so you can extract what you need.
    I will sudgest you buy an All Weather Warrior in 270 Winchester and get a scope you can afford with turrets that are easy to adjust in the field (I'm not nessesarily saying buy a tactical scope, just one that you can confidently adjust for range and conditions).
    If you don't have a chronograph and can't beg or borrow from a friend the $150.00 for a chrony is priceless for long range. So is $150.00 for a hand held weather station and a pocket sized notebook to keep track of your progress.
    Start with the less expensive factory ammo that offers proven hunting projectiles.
    Shoot each box through in five shot groups and clean between the groups with a light clean or bore snake.
    When you find a factory ammo that gives one MOA or better at 100 yards and a standard deviation of 15 or less, start shooting it at 100 yard incriments out to your desired 800 yards.
    Use inch drop targets to let you know exactly where that bullet is hitting at that range out of your rifle and prove your rangefider at the same time.
    Keep track of all the information from the chrony weather station and targets and compare it to Ballistic calculators you can find free on line. You will find a combo of all these things that you are confident with.
    By the time you have done all of this you will know two or three factory ammo choices that work for you and your rifle... and there won't be a deer your rangefinder gives you a number for that you won't be butchering later that day.
    Have fun, shoot safe and good luck.
     
  12. DirtyOldTrix3006

    DirtyOldTrix3006 Member

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    Hey if you are reloading... still go with the 270. I agree with the 308 not being as great as some think it is. It's not bad, don't get me wrong, I launched thousands of them in the military, but I don't own one now...
     
  13. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    After 40 years shooting a 279 Win and having a few 308 Wins

    • a 270 Win and a 308 Win born with equal opportunity will shoot together.
    • 30 cal has a more extensive bullet selection
    • any 270 projectile will shoot flatter than any similar weight 308 Win projectile @ a given MV.
    • Both cartridges with proper bullet and velocity is effective on white tails at the distance you specify
    Which means that both cartridges with proper drop chart development will place the bullet vertically where you are capable of placing it.

    Deal breaker or Deal maker depending on you you look at it is: all 270 cal projectiles have a better bc than similar weight 30 cal projectiles.

    Thus the ol' 270 is the hands down choice .

    I'd recommend a 140 gr bullet but I've done the job on many mule deer w/130s.

    If any of this post is inaccurate it's because my earlier taken meds haven't worn off plus I just finished watching pres. debate......what a thriller.