New Brass Prep

beefdip

Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2017
Messages
12
Hey everyone, I have got my first batch of Hornady brass (X300). I have reloaded for a bit now, but it was all fired factory ammo. I have done a lot of research and with everything else to do with shooting, everyone has a different opinion. This ammo is for long range shooting. So this is what I have decided to do/have done.

1. Just have a good look at the brass. I took about 15 pieces (out of 100) and just had a general look at them (neck dinged up, flash hole not centered, etc).
2. Took a few measurements just to see how much the brass will change once fired.
3. Flash hole cleaning (just the inside)
4. Primer pocket reaming (although I now feel that this may have been a waste of time).
5. Neck size (with dry graphite)
6. Chamfer inside and outside of neck.

This is where I am now. I am debating on outside neck turning. First of all there is a lot of debate on whether it even needs to be done. Next is I have a Forster trimmer with the outside neck turner. But since I have already neck sized, the mandrel (for the cutter) is pretty tight. The brass cannot be turned now. I have read of neck expanders but if it is another item that I don't need then I would prefer not (I have plenty enough of that stuff already). I have also read that some people outside turn after the first fire (I had some fired brass and it turned quite nice, I cut 10 to do an experiment against 10 that I will leave original).
Last question, is there anything else that I am missing here. Thanks as always.
 

Canhunter35

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2017
Messages
2,978
I usually run through the resizing die to true them up and take any dings out then chamfer inside of case. I’m not a benchrest shooter and looking for .1moa groups so I guess it’s what your trying to achieve, but it’s been my experience good load development and consistent reloading practice will achieve all the accuracy I’m capable of shooting.
 

Rick Richard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2014
Messages
4,227
Location
North Carolina
Competition shooting of any kind requires a whole different level of precision. For the most of us who just want to hunt or be consistent at the range, simple but consistent reloading methods will provide what we need. Trim the brass all the same, keep neck tension within .002 to .003, find best projectile seating depths....and do your part.
 

Savage6.5

Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2018
Messages
5
Location
California
Competition shooting of any kind requires a whole different level of precision. For the most of us who just want to hunt or be consistent at the range, simple but consistent reloading methods will provide what we need. Trim the brass all the same, keep neck tension within .002 to .003, find best projectile seating depths....and do your part.
Just a newbe thought, I got a 100 new Hornady 6.5 Creed, all were within 4 tho. I separated into 4 group's, I'm thinking trim when I need to, as long as what I'm loading is same length?
 

beefdip

Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2017
Messages
12
I was told by a multi multi F-class, PRS winner that case length is not that important. Just make sure it is below the max and you will be fine is what he told me. I trim my 6.5 mm CM to 1.900". The book says max is 1.920", trim to 1.910". I trim a bit more so then I don't have trim so often.
 

Savage6.5

Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2018
Messages
5
Location
California
I was told by a multi multi F-class, PRS winner that case length is not that important. Just make sure it is below the max and you will be fine is what he told me. I trim my 6.5 mm CM to 1.900". The book says max is 1.920", trim to 1.910". I trim a bit more so then I don't have trim so often.
That direction may work for you, but after reading a detailed procedure by varmit Al, he says even the specs in manuals max length, there is still room to grow in factory barrels. You must measure your chamber to get Max case length, and then trim to a safe oal. I'm in the process of ordering the proper guage to measure my 6.5. here's the link of a good read.
http://www.varmintal.com/arelo.htm#Case_Length
 

cdherman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2008
Messages
320
Location
Kansas City
I too have been reloading and reading about reloading for years, and have never heard of needed to measure the exact chamber length before. But I read what varmintal had to say. It won't hurt -- that much I'll give you. But this guy, does a lot of things. In fact, if he does every thing he describes he surely spends 10 hours reloading for every hour shooting.

And, i suppose it might very well matter if your chosen cartridge had a very short/small neck to bore ratio, this making every thousandth of an inch important. CM is not super guilty in that regard.
 
Top