New 300 WM —How to find “THE”bullet

Pdumont

New Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2015
Messages
2
You need to find the right bullet and the right speed your bullet likes in your barrel... This is a labor of love, I start with Nosler Accubond... 180 Gn... Then build 5 with Powder #1, Lets say RL 17, 1, at 66.5, 2, at 67.5, 3 at 68, 4 69, 5 70. So your building 5 rounds at each level of powder. Yes, 25 rounds for 1 powder. Then powder #2, Then #3 and so on till you find the one that matches your barrel exactly. I do 5, You can do as low as 3 or 4 each, But I like to see the groups 5 rounds make. My 7 RUM likes the highest max powder charge Nosler recommends. And I shoot 1000 yards regularly, But only at targets. My hunting limit is 700.
If you can't find one that groups, then move on to another size manuf. and try that. Yeap. It takes some time, and can be frustrating, but once you've got it. You've got it. Many gun Manuf. charge big $$$ for this service and they make you buy their ammo only.
 

SidecarFlip

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2011
Messages
4,442
Location
S.E. Michigan
Might as well start out with the best... 200gr. Nosler Partition. Maybe a 250 if you're going to get close. Not the least expensive bullets around but nothing works better! They are the bullets that all the others get compared to, so it's easier to just start out the gold standard!
Cheers,
crkckr
Personal opinion. I cannot get Noslers to shoot for beans., at least not the 30 caliber ones. Like their brass because they prep correctly. Pills, not so much.

Might shoot good for you but for someone else, maybe not. I shoot every bullet manufacturer btw.

I never say anything is the best because best fir you may be crap for someone else.
 

Danny Butler

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Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
121
Location
MARSHALL, Texas
Shilen says the 1/8 twist is for 220 grain and heavier bullets? I can’t imagine why Browning would would run that twist on a hunting rifle..anyway... you gonna have to get heavy with your bullets on that rig.
 

bigngreen

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2008
Messages
8,132
Location
SW Montana
I wonder how many people responding even read the OP? I've seen at least three bullets highly recommended that won't even open at the desired ranges?
Small groups at 100 yards don't offer much on a long range load, how about some cold bore plus two for groups at 1000+ over ranging temps which is what make a long range hunting load in the first place!!
 

SidecarFlip

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Joined
Dec 12, 2011
Messages
4,442
Location
S.E. Michigan
It is at a 100 and because it don't count I added the upside down elk. I didn't count how many packages of Elk meat I put in the freezer either.
I do elk, bear, mulie and whitetail. My preference is any of them that aren't eating sage. Don't like my meat spiced.
 

seeemmiss

New Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2019
Messages
1
Location
Canton, GA
I will never understand why so many people recommend a cup and core bullet for elk. Sure they shoot tiny groups but there are much tougher bullets that shoot very accurate also. Maybe 1/2 larger group but I had rather have the tough bullet if I have a choice. Maybe Berger bullets have killed plenty of far off game but I hate to think of the ones that had to be shot three or four times because the bullet exploded before it made it very far inside the animal. I will stick with the Nosler Partition or an Accubond possibly. I guess it’s just an opinion based hopefully on experience in the field and not at the range.
 

MAD10

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2010
Messages
197
Location
CO
215 to 230 grain bullets is the norm for 26" barrels in LR world.

250 primers
H1000
with good brass
you'll end up in the 70/79 grains

10/20 thou off the lands

but if you can't I've jumped the in the 50/60 thou range and still ridiculous accuracy and low ES
 

bigngreen

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2008
Messages
8,132
Location
SW Montana
I will never understand why so many people recommend a cup and core bullet for elk. Sure they shoot tiny groups but there are much tougher bullets that shoot very accurate also. Maybe 1/2 larger group but I had rather have the tough bullet if I have a choice. Maybe Berger bullets have killed plenty of far off game but I hate to think of the ones that had to be shot three or four times because the bullet exploded before it made it very far inside the animal. I will stick with the Nosler Partition or an Accubond possibly. I guess it’s just an opinion based hopefully on experience in the field and not at the range.
Obviously you don't have real experience shooting Berger's, I've seen hundreds of elk shot from spitting distance to well beyond 1000 yards and have seen a significantly higher percentage of one shot kills and recovery than with Barnes or Accubonds. It took a long time for me to be convinced since I'd drank a lot of Koolaid about elk bullets but the numbers were a stark contrast when we switched to heavy for cal cup and core, one shot in became the norm!!
 

Canhunter35

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2017
Messages
2,782
I wonder how many people responding even read the OP? I've seen at least three bullets highly recommended that won't even open at the desired ranges?
Small groups at 100 yards don't offer much on a long range load, how about some cold bore plus two for groups at 1000+ over ranging temps which is what make a long range hunting load in the first place!!
While I agree, not sure why posting group size at any range is significant to the ops question? To me he was looking for advice on how people choose their bullets and build loads.
Personally with a 1:8 twist there’s no way I could resist trying the heavies, 230/225 and comparing to the 212/215s while ballistically the 212/215 probably will outperform the real heavies you might find a better long range load, with any of them, difference in wind drift would be insignificant I would think.
If throated properly, what can the 300wm get the 230s to velocity wise?
 

HunterLongRange

Active Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2015
Messages
25
I’d give you a solid answer...however (canhunter35) from above saved me the time. Very good answer to your question... take notes and document everything. Altitude, weather, wind, etc.
 

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