Need to Buy a Nice Factory Rifle for a Fundraiser....Which one

asd9055

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2013
Messages
1,612
Location
Texas
Weatherby 6.5-300 Wby Mag MkV (Wood)

MKV-Ultramark.jpg
I'd buy raffle tickets for that
 

Pro2A

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Joined
May 23, 2009
Messages
535
I suspect the decision has already been made, but I'm going to offer my $0.02 just because I've done what you're doing before and didn't know the pitfalls. My opinion is going to go against the grain of more than 90% of the respondents, and will likely land me some hate mail. That said, I would just like to offer my experience and observations and then let you do as you wish.

Back in 1992, I was the president of a college campus association (not a fraternity) and was tasked with creating a fundraiser for our annual awards ceremony. I was an avid hunter and gun nut back then just like now. My faculty adviser suggested if I was going to do a gun raffle that I make it a Mossberg 500, Remington 870, or Remington ADL. But OHHH NO! I wanted a quality piece that would really bring the donations. Something someone would really want and donate big bucks for a big chance at a gun of a lifetime.

Fortunately, we had a kid in our association whose father ran a pawn shop in a nearby city and held an FFL. He was willing to order us our gun of choice at cost. Back then, the choices were much fewer, but I knew the Cadillac was the Weatherby Mark V. So I had them order a new Mark V (don't recall the exact model, but likely a Weathermark) chambered in 7mm Wby. I was able to get that Mark V for under $600. I was sure I'd make a fortune for the organization. In the meantime, my faculty adviser nearly passed out when he heard what I'd spent from the treasury. Still, I wasn't worried and told him to relax and trust me. "This is what the ALL want," I assured him.

To make a long story slightly longer, we worked the Walmart entrances, the entire campus for faculty and students, members solicited to their friends, families, and Churches. In about 2 1/2 months just before the end of the semester, I finally broke us even on donations. We wound up $40 to the good and had to scramble to find other means of funding the awards banquet. Much to my chagrin, I saw that the adviser had been correct in his assessment.

The moral of the story is that people will donate if they are going to donate regardless of what you offer. If they don't do donations, they still won't, no matter of you're offering a $2500 semicustom or a $500 Ruger American with Cerakote. Further, contrary to popular belief here on this forum, Seekins, Fierce, Larue, Christensen, POF, etc. AREN'T household names to the "general public." The general public still knows Remington, Ruger, Winchester, Browning, Weatherby, and maybe Tikka or Sako if you're lucky. I do understand you don't want to look like a cheapskate and want to offer something nice, but that higher price tag is going to eat into your profit margin greatly, and you MAY not even break even.

For ANY sort of raffle that isn't for a group of seasoned hunters or shooters (i.e. for the general public around a high school) there's no way I'd spend $2500 on the prize. Get a Browning Long Range Max Hunter or Tikka Alpine Veil of you want to get something nice that they will recognize and pocket the extra money for the event you're trying to fund.

Remember, the moms out there that want to donate to help the kids and maybe Win something for her husband for Christmas isn't going to give more because the name is one brand vs another. Many dads will be looking for something nice for their kid for Christmas or a nephew. They would probably want to start with something they are more familiar with than any of the $2500 semi-customs.

So there's a fool's advice. Go ahead and bash me. I don't think any of the suggestions are for "bad guns." They're all great. I just know the habits of the general public and their mindset on donations. Either way, good luck, and let us know how it turns out.
300 Dakota, agree with your perspective, insight. Hence, my earlier suggestion to be creative. Let the winner build/pick his own option.....can't be wrong.....it's their choice....rifle, shotgun, pistol, ammo, gear....it's a "gift card"....avoids the initial cash outlay risk as noted by 300Dakota. Again, be creative. But, then, most won't exercise their brain It's the opportunity differentiator. . Supplier gets heavy advertising billing for donating item/s or providing at cost for maximum winner value. Caution...if a gift card, the winner faces sales tax value erosion....maybe 8-13% real value loss....Governors always win even without buying a ticket.. If raffle orders from supplier's "donation" offering, the supplier pays no sales tax.....for his business cost purposes. Eye candy benefit....supplier can provide on loan for any in-person events, or pics for advertising/signs/raffle ticket visuals. The thermometer idea allows for varying levels of ticket sales and value level of prizes., inducement to sell more tickets to their buddies to raise prize value. It's all in the marketing/advertising....or lack there of....it's opportunity. Yeah, there may be tax consequences for the winner either way. Beating the tax man is fast challenging baseball as the American national past time. O-P-P-O-R-T-U-N-I-T-Y.....some make a lot of money for themselves; other make a lot of money for others....choice. YMMV
 

ndking1126

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2010
Messages
499
I suspect the decision has already been made, but I'm going to offer my $0.02 just because I've done what you're doing before and didn't know the pitfalls. My opinion is going to go against the grain of more than 90% of the respondents, and will likely land me some hate mail. That said, I would just like to offer my experience and observations and then let you do as you wish.

Back in 1992, I was the president of a college campus association (not a fraternity) and was tasked with creating a fundraiser for our annual awards ceremony. I was an avid hunter and gun nut back then just like now. My faculty adviser suggested if I was going to do a gun raffle that I make it a Mossberg 500, Remington 870, or Remington ADL. But OHHH NO! I wanted a quality piece that would really bring the donations. Something someone would really want and donate big bucks for a big chance at a gun of a lifetime.

Fortunately, we had a kid in our association whose father ran a pawn shop in a nearby city and held an FFL. He was willing to order us our gun of choice at cost. Back then, the choices were much fewer, but I knew the Cadillac was the Weatherby Mark V. So I had them order a new Mark V (don't recall the exact model, but likely a Weathermark) chambered in 7mm Wby. I was able to get that Mark V for under $600. I was sure I'd make a fortune for the organization. In the meantime, my faculty adviser nearly passed out when he heard what I'd spent from the treasury. Still, I wasn't worried and told him to relax and trust me. "This is what the ALL want," I assured him.

To make a long story slightly longer, we worked the Walmart entrances, the entire campus for faculty and students, members solicited to their friends, families, and Churches. In about 2 1/2 months just before the end of the semester, I finally broke us even on donations. We wound up $40 to the good and had to scramble to find other means of funding the awards banquet. Much to my chagrin, I saw that the adviser had been correct in his assessment.

The moral of the story is that people will donate if they are going to donate regardless of what you offer. If they don't do donations, they still won't, no matter of you're offering a $2500 semicustom or a $500 Ruger American with Cerakote. Further, contrary to popular belief here on this forum, Seekins, Fierce, Larue, Christensen, POF, etc. AREN'T household names to the "general public." The general public still knows Remington, Ruger, Winchester, Browning, Weatherby, and maybe Tikka or Sako if you're lucky. I do understand you don't want to look like a cheapskate and want to offer something nice, but that higher price tag is going to eat into your profit margin greatly, and you MAY not even break even.

For ANY sort of raffle that isn't for a group of seasoned hunters or shooters (i.e. for the general public around a high school) there's no way I'd spend $2500 on the prize. Get a Browning Long Range Max Hunter or Tikka Alpine Veil of you want to get something nice that they will recognize and pocket the extra money for the event you're trying to fund.

Remember, the moms out there that want to donate to help the kids and maybe Win something for her husband for Christmas isn't going to give more because the name is one brand vs another. Many dads will be looking for something nice for their kid for Christmas or a nephew. They would probably want to start with something they are more familiar with than any of the $2500 semi-customs.

So there's a fool's advice. Go ahead and bash me. I don't think any of the suggestions are for "bad guns." They're all great. I just know the habits of the general public and their mindset on donations. Either way, good luck, and let us know how it turns out.
I agree with you completely, household names are good. I can't help but wonder how much your caliber choice made it difficult to get tickets sold. Calibers with "Weatherby" in the name equates to very expensive ammo and lots of recoil for people in the know. I would recommend they not even be considered.
 

MontanaJack

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2010
Messages
94
Can’t go wrong with Weatherby, but select a commercial caliber. Weatherby cartridges & brass are expensive. Never heard a bad word about Cooper, in fact very happy owners. Based on my personal experience with Kimber & Christensen - avoid. They either shoot or they don’t. Browning Hells Canyon 6.5 Creedmoor is a great choice. Avoid magnums. The stocks on production rifles don’t manage recoil effectively. Sako rather than Tika for brand recognition. Savage, Winchester, and Ruger are great rifles, but Brands may not appeal to those seeking a more “exclusive” brand.

Fun post!! Thank you!!
 

BPollard

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Joined
Jul 16, 2020
Messages
205
Location
NJ
Can’t go wrong with Weatherby, but select a commercial caliber. Weatherby cartridges & brass are expensive. Never heard a bad word about Cooper, in fact very happy owners. Based on my personal experience with Kimber & Christensen - avoid. They either shoot or they don’t. Browning Hells Canyon 6.5 Creedmoor is a great choice. Avoid magnums. The stocks on production rifles don’t manage recoil effectively. Sako rather than Tika for brand recognition. Savage, Winchester, and Ruger are great rifles, but Brands may not appeal to those seeking a more “exclusive” brand.

Fun post!! Thank you!!
Yeah I get a Creedmoor in a carbon mark great gun killed 5 dear with it already
 

Lenny Foffa

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2017
Messages
572
I know the specialists and the guys with the $5000 LR Precision Rifles will kick me for saying this ( and also my Weatherby Friends ) but ,I would suggest the Winchester Model 70 Super Grade Rifle chambered in 30 -06. Everybody knows the name ,and most people know that model, so it won't appear to be over sophisticated and technical , and even people who live in outer Mongolia know what a 30-06 is. A Very Nice classic ,generic package. Need more to make the package more exciting???? Add a Leupold Vari X 3 3.5 to 10 X scope, on Dual Dove tail bases. A very nice hunting package ! IMHO
 

otisdog

Active Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2011
Messages
28
Location
Alabama
I’ve done a few of these raffles for charity. Around here folks really seem to go for the higher end ar style rifles.
 

Allen Kitts

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2017
Messages
579
Location
Florence, Montana
I agree with the CA Ridgeline. They are nice rifles and shoot well, at least the ones I own. There are many though that I am sure would bring good money in an auction. I also agree with getting a rifle that all people have heard of. Up until the opened the new Scheels store here in Missoula last weekend I had never seen a HAVAK in real life. Don't get me wrong great looking rifles but I think people are more likely to buy what they know or are familiar with rather than what they don't. Christensens are everywhere at least where I live and in the northwest. Maybe I am just lucky on my location. JMO.
 

Stammster

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 22, 2020
Messages
625
Location
Houston, Texas
How is this going to work? You or someone else is going to buy the gun for the auction and then you just hand it to the winner?

I don’t think so.

Therefore I suggest you work with a LGS that has the gun you decide on. They can handle the background check and transfer. If the winner doesn’t like the gun, caliber, etc., then they have the option to change within the $2500 budget, buy up, etc. Just put that on the ticket. You’ll get more people interested as basically you are saying they get a $2500 store credit for whatever’s they want.
 

HuntnPack

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2012
Messages
843
Location
The Wilderness
Consider a Rifle package ready to hunt.
Tikka T3X in 6.5 Creedmoor
Vortex Razor HD LHT
Scope mounts
Rifle sling
Gun Case
2- boxes of ammo.
It’d make a good rifle for the ticket buyer themselves or great to gift to someone.
 

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