Need some guidance..

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Swatman05, Jan 10, 2019.


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  1. BUCKWORKMAN

    BUCKWORKMAN Active Member

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    110 grain Accubond @ 3300 FPS Kilisem' dead like a mo. fo…[​IMG] .
     
  2. Swatman05

    Swatman05 Well-Known Member

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    300WM?
     
  3. HTJ

    HTJ Member

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    You should look st the 280 Rem or 280AI.
    Great calibers for elk size game and down, little recoil and no muzzle break required. Best of luck.
     
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  4. HTJ

    HTJ Member

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    You should look at the 280 Rem or 280 AI. Great calibers for elk size game and down, little recoil and no muzzle break required.
    Best of luck.
     
  5. L.Sherm

    L.Sherm Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    I shot a Rem 280 for 15 years and I've reloaded for 3-280AI. The 280AI have some buck to them but if your not recoil shy then no brake needed or on a 300WM for that matter. I think the recoil on the 280AI and 300 Wm are comparable, I think the 280AI is a little sharper.
    Theres still nothing like a 200+ grain bullet whacking a elk at 2900 fps +
     
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  6. greenejc

    greenejc Well-Known Member

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    The Ruger Hawkeye is a great rifle, and it is very accurate. It will weigh in at about 7.5 lbs in a 22" tube, and a few ounces more in a 24". I have one in 6mm Rem. and one in 30-06. They make an FTW Hunter model in the Hawkeye in 300 winmag with a 24 inch barrel and a Ruger removable muzzle break. Runs around a thousand dollars. They used to make it in 30-06. Weight is 8.2 lbs. I'm 67 years old and have no problem carrying a Ruger M77 MKII with scope (about 9.5 lbs) all day up and down mountains. And the extra weight over some of these ultra uber light rifles makes it easy to shoot accurately because it soaks up some of the recoil. I shoot 600 yards and farther with the -06. Its really all you need for elk. Just stay with the 180 grain bullets.
     
  7. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    The .300wm is never the wrong answer. I have the NWP muzzle brakes on a dozen of my rifles and love it.

    https://www.macsgunworks.com/muzzle-brakes

    The slotted version is the one you want.

    With elk as your primary goal the 300wm is a great choice but if you're going to do a lot of high volume shooting for practice something like the 6.5CM or .260 Remington is going to pay for itself pretty quickly.

    Even with a good MB you are likely to get fatigued from the recoil and blast of the .300wm where the 6.5's like the .260 and 6.5CM are extremely "user friendly" and you'll both spend more time at the range practicing and enjoy it more with them.

    Surprisingly your ballistics are very similar with both of them and the .300wm as well at least out to a thousand yards so you will be getting very beneficial practice all the way around with them.
     
  8. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    I have the Ruger Hawkeye FTW long range in .260 and have been extremely pleased with it.
     
  9. rustyshackleford

    rustyshackleford Well-Known Member

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    It seems pretty well established that from 30-06 to 300 Weatherby are all right decisions. Ammo cost between 30-06 and 300 win mag aren't that far apart and if you used to have a 340 recoil shouldn't be a factor. As far as off the shelf rifles, my recommendation is one of the new Winchesters. I picked up an extreme weather 30-06 last summer and have been more than happy. Accuracy has hovered right under MOA with factory loads and the factory trigger adjusted to just over 3 lbs with no take-up or overtravel. I have 3 new production Winchesters so I feel pretty confident saying you should expect sub MOA performance.
     
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  10. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    You're sharing a forum with some of the most capable shooters in the country and I'll go out on a limb and say I'm speaking for most of us.

    Shooting an Elk at 1,550 yds with a 6.5CM is a grossly irresponsible act no matter how good of a shot you are.

    There are simply too many factors coming into play here that could easily add up to a wounded elk being lost starting with the fight time. An animal the size of an elk can easily move 4-6' by taking a couple of steps between the time the trigger is pulled and the bullet arriving.

    Secondly is the lack of mass and energy in a bullet that small at that range.

    You'd even get a lot of argument here if you stated the 6.5CM was even adequate at 600yds.

    We owe it to the game we seek to do everything we can to ensure a clean, quick kill when we pull the trigger and that can't be done with any 6.5 at that range.
     
  11. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    There are certainly some "off the shelf" rifles more than capable of meeting your goals.
     
  12. Roughwater

    Roughwater Well-Known Member

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    I have to contradict a part of the above statement.
    The 28 nosler if hard kicking sure don't feel like it. I know a hard kicking gun and my 28 hells canyon isn't it. I have shot it without the brake and its not even hard kicking with out it. I plan to shoot it from now on without the brake.
    Spensive. Comparatively speaking there is no discount store version that I have found in the 28, not yet anyway. The least expensive version of it is in one of the Browning A bolts which aren't super high priced but you're not going to find a 400 dollar one either. I like the X-bolt version much better myself which often retails in the 800 $ range and the Hells canyon model even better in the 1000 $ range. But it's truely an exceptional gun. The only thing I dislike about it is the cost of the brass. But there looks to be more brass makers in the process of selling brass for it so that should help a lot.

    It's easy to get confused with all this for sure. When I was looking myself for a gun only a few weeks back I was kinda in the same boat as you but I already had a 270 short mag and a 300 Wm. I liked them both but both were on the heavy side, especially the WM and neither had any real weather protection. After hunting a couple days in the rain and having hiked into a area in Utah and living in a tent that had nearly lost it's battle with staying dry in the rain made me feel like a more weatherproof rifle made sense. I felt like one of the 7mm types made sense for me and would be a little lighter than getting another 30 cal of some kind. Also, I started out wanting to keep cost down too but I made the mistake of holding a gun in my hands that felt so good I didn't want to let it go. The 280AI looked like a good choice but the 7mm Rem mag was slightly more powerful. At first I didn't even consider the 28 Nosler but I went ahead and threw it into the mix. After looking and stressing for sometime I wondered if I would be trying to load the 280AI or 7mm mag hotter than I should? So I thought maybe a 28 would be good then I could load it to a medium load and have more energy and velocity than with the other 7mm types.
    If I were to choose between a 280 and a 280AI, I would go AI for sure. Between 280AI and 7mm Rem mag? If you don't reload you need to go with the 7mm Rem mag in my opinion. If you do reload the 7mm rem is still more powerful but not by much. The strong point of buying a 280AI however is slightly less recoil and generally comes in faster twist rates to allow loading the heaviest bullets or buying the heaviest rounds per caliber if you wish. Still if money is an issue it's 7mm hands down as you can find guns, ammo and brass will be much more plentiful for it and cheaper than the newer 280AI or even the older 280.
     
  13. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Felt recoil and recoil tolerance are as much about perception as they are about physics. To most people the 26 Nosler would be a "hard kicker" and the 28 certainly would be particularly with heavy for caliber bullets.

    To those of us who've been shooting big magnums since we got out of diapers, not so much but we're the exception to the rule.
     
  14. Harvey Durham

    Harvey Durham Well-Known Member

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    The 6.5 creedmoor is a great gun but in my opinion to small for elk. Yes a property placed round will get the job done but there’s so little tolorance there and the lack of energy at anything past 300 years is just not there, I own one but it will NEVER go elk hunting with me. Next, on a 2,000 SHOT, a .300 Norma mag .284 or a .338 Lapua AI nothing smaller. A .300 WSM is a great rifle and again I own one but just does not have the energy to reach past 1,000 yards for an *Rule 1 Violation*al kill.
    I own all of these guns and many more. For serious long range one mile and beyond you need to look at a Chey-Teck.338 or .375.

    I hope this helps,

    Harvey