Neck turning for a factory rifle?

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Al8095, Feb 17, 2004.

  1. Al8095

    Al8095 Member

    Messages:
    17
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Hey guys, I've ordered the necessities to start loading but I have read in a few threads that it is not worth it to neck turn for a factory rifle. I shoot a Remington Sendero 7mm ultra mag. I want to make the most accurate ammo I can but don't want to waste the time on neck turning if it won't be worth it. What does everyone think?
     
  2. Brian Rybicky

    Brian Rybicky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    160
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2003
    Al,

    I think with factory guns it falls into one of those "It cant hurt" catagories ive turned the necks for my .308 and have not seen any real improvement. If your shooting bench with that gun then do it, but if not spend that time at the range.

    Good Shootin,
    Brian
     
  3. DANTEC

    DANTEC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    390
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2002
    with factory chamber best is to go with fitted neck , made from upper size case available ( as 300 RUM ) after run in full size you can neck turn them to get better neck clerance and no defect .

    if you want to escape to turn turning you can sort your case by neck wall cocentricity with tool as Sinclair , Necoo or even RCBS if you sucess to get near perfect wall and neck cocentricy that avoid neck turning but important points are :

    square the neck with a good case trimmer to minimum lenght

    chamfer outside the neck at 45° with a RCBS or similar tools

    chamfer inside with VLD chamfer tools ( K&M or Lyman or Holland )

    deburr inside the flash / ream it

    that allow to get good case to make good ammo .

    good shooting

    DAN TEC
     
  4. Sako7STW

    Sako7STW Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    434
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2004
    Good info. been trying to figure this kneck turning stuff out myself.
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    If I understand this right, I can neck down a 30-06 case to 270, have a slightly thicker neck and then neck turn to get even thickness in the neck for a factory chamber. Could this help in the accuracy department?
     
  6. 4mesh063

    4mesh063 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    374
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2002
    Yes the brass will get a little thicker but mostly it will get longer.

    recently I bought Winchester brass for my 220 swift and before neck turning it, a loaded round measured .264. Holy thick Batman. I turned them down to .015 on a side. This is a factory chambering and .264 is about the exact neck size. These cases went in tight. I didn't like the idea of shooting them so I pulled the bullets. I'd be afraid of selling brass that was that thick for use by the general public. Anyone who shoots an already hot load would be put over the top.

    I guess when you reload, you should expect to check everything out before pulling the trigger. Even when my brass was .013, I turned them to .012 in order to make them consistant. Did it help, probably not. But, it doesnt' hurt either. Recently I was told by someone of an article they read and it's message was a very interesting point about "Hobbies". This one in particular (shooting/reloading) fits the statement well. "Have fun with your hobbies and enjoy all the things you do for what they are at the moment. Stop making hobbies into a job and looking only at the end results. The trip is part of it too."

    In other words, sit in a comfy chair and turn necks!
     
  7. dwm

    dwm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    739
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    When I first got my REM700 25-06 Sendero I started neck turning the cases just enough to get the neck wall thickness the same all the way around. I don't turn them enough to make the whole neck shiny. Maybe 80% of the neck is cut by the tool.

    Then I neck size the cases, but only running the die half to 3/4 the way down the neck.

    This combination produces a nice concentric neck and also leaves some of the neck expanded/larger to hold the neck in the center of the chamber and line the bullet up concentric with the bore.

    This works well for rifles with factory chambers.

    It got me from 3/4 MOA groups down to consistent sub 1/2 MOA groups with a factory Sendero.
     
  8. Al8095

    Al8095 Member

    Messages:
    17
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Thanks everyone, I guess it couldn't hurt so I will try your method dwm. Thanks again
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    What's a good neck turning tool?
     
  10. 4mesh063

    4mesh063 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    374
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2002
    K&M.
     
  11. Michael Eichele

    Michael Eichele Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,860
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    [ 02-18-2004: Message edited by: meichele ]
     
  12. Brent

    Brent Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2001
    K&M

    Doug,
    Are you using a die with a guideing sleeve, like the Redding Comp die?

    I neck turn for 100% clean up, no more than necessary though. I don't leave a thin spot anywhere, however small. Inconsistant neck tension for one, and stretching in the same weak spot every firing may lead to a real thin spot that split more readily.

    It's my opinion that a factory neck is way too loose to begin with and work hardening is far too rapid to ever keep consistant neck tension without bushing dies and something to measure seating force.

    How many guys are out there that set a barrel back a half inch or so in order to get a tight neck and maybe a shorter throat in their factory barrels?