Neck tension variation

IHFarmer07

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Dec 29, 2013
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358
I have pretty well conquered neck tension by turning necks, annealing every firing and setting necks with a mandrel, but there are always a few cases that go into the fouling box for unknown reasons.
Bingo! This here ^^^^ was the only way I was able to get consistent neck tension. Neck turning to just where the cutter barely touches the shoulder. Make sure you use the corresponding degree angle cutter as your shoulder.

Ive been down this rabbit hole and then some and it’s still not perfect. Donuts can be your nightmare for precision shooting. Some seat their bullets’ base just to that spot on purpose and have their barrel throated for a certain bullet.
 

johngibbs222

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Jun 15, 2012
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I had an issue like this, generally speaking it was with R-P 223 brass. As I have a single shot rifle I only ever neck size cases.
My fix was to use a spare decapping pin that I polished down with emery to remove about 0.001" from the diameter then run the unloaded cases through the Lee factory crimp die with the pin in the neck of the case, this cured it almost 100%, I have a split collet tap wrench that I use to hold the pin and a quick twist and it comes out, must be a bit like pulling teeth :oops::oops:
I've never experienced it with my 308 but I don't have any R-P brass for it.
 

Wedgy

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Feb 9, 2013
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I have tried SS pins and ultrasonic cleaning but it left the brass squeaky clean to where bullets would actually squeak when seated unless I lubed them and required more seating force than I wanted.
I anneal using the salt bath method as I found it more consistent than a torch but am a bit curious of how it may affect the carbon in the necks. Is it hot enough to burn it out ?
Regardless, I still get some that require more or less than the usual amount of seating force and will set them aside for fouling or paper targets.
 

Mike Matteson

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Jun 26, 2017
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I find that what has been stated, very interesting from Mikecr and QuietTexan. Reinforces what I have read in other places. Thanks! This goes into my notes on my 6mm/280AI, and other places.
 

Lenny Foffa

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Mar 6, 2017
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The bench rest 'Elite" guys at my range seem to use Bushing dies that allow for the slightest neck tension Possible. Change Barrels all the time , so they also change neck tension ,too. Also many used to turn necks, but now no longer do. The one hole game seems to create endless dissatisfaction of everything year after year. Guys who actually won matches last year , change the formula if the ever come in 3rd or 4th at a match this year. I guess they forgot they won with what they had made . For me personally, I think Hunting loads in Hunting Rifles are different. When I find a Combination of Case; Bullet : Powder and Charge of that powder ;and Primer all made into a careful load my Rifle REALLY likes, I stay with that load for years and years , maybe forever . If my Pre season targets are great and I have made a few One shot Kills where the deer never took a step , I say its a great deer load. If I make a bad shot on a deer one season , I say "its me." I think something like neck tension has a real important place in Bench Rest shooting, but not too much importance in a ( my ) Hunting rifle.
 

IHFarmer07

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Joined
Dec 29, 2013
Messages
358
I have tried SS pins and ultrasonic cleaning but it left the brass squeaky clean to where bullets would actually squeak when seated unless I lubed them and required more seating force than I wanted.
I anneal using the salt bath method as I found it more consistent than a torch but am a bit curious of how it may affect the carbon in the necks. Is it hot enough to burn it out ?
Regardless, I still get some that require more or less than the usual amount of seating force and will set them aside for fouling or paper targets.
I use ss pins. I started to lower the time I tumble and it keeps the carbon in the neck.
 

Mikecr

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Aug 10, 2003
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NC, oceanfront
I have tried SS pins and ultrasonic cleaning but it left the brass squeaky clean to where bullets would actually squeak when seated unless I lubed them and required more seating force than I wanted.
Yeah, don't do any of that.
I anneal using the salt bath method as I found it more consistent than a torch but am a bit curious of how it may affect the carbon in the necks. Is it hot enough to burn it out ?
The core of our star can't burn carbon. At worst, it's adherence in necks could change.
All that's needed is standard vibratory cleaning (w/standard medium).
Make sure your sized neck interference is not excessive. As little as 1thou under cal for near length of seated bullet bearing is plenty.
 

CBH Australia

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Dec 12, 2020
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Australia
So many variables and so much to learn.

I too peered over the edge of the rabbit hole and stepped back.

So many things might work but I think hunters and benchrest/ F/Class are a different class.

We would all like ragged holes but it depends on how far we are willing to go to achieve it. This could include both time and money.

Hunting doesn't burn so many rounds but premium projectiles and travel add to the cost. It's all relevant.

It's a good conversation and hopefully some of these things will work for some. .

Yeah, don't do any of that.

The core of our star can't burn carbon. At worst, it's adherence in necks could change.
All that's needed is standard vibratory cleaning (w/standard medium).
Make sure your sized neck interference is not excessive. As little as 1thou under cal for near length of seated bullet bearing is plenty.
 

Wedgy

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Feb 9, 2013
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2,441
At worst, it's adherence in necks could change.
All that's needed is standard vibratory cleaning (w/standard medium).
Make sure your sized neck interference is not excessive. As little as 1thou under cal for near length of seated bullet bearing is plenty.
Yes, having the carbon peel off the brass was my worry.
Standard tumble is my practice now.
Interference/tension is my issue in a non-lead state as most monos have bands and not a smooth bearing surface. I'm dialed on my Bergers but the different bearing surfaces and hard/soft alloy compounds of different monos sets a whole new trap.
And thank you for your input
 
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