Neck bulging with ttsx

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Raudy707, Jun 24, 2019.


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  1. Raudy707

    Raudy707 Well-Known Member

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    So I hate to throw my shooting partner under the bus but those are his reloads. I went to his house this morning and used my chamfer tool on his brass. We adjusted the seating die to eliminate the over crimping and added a touch of graphite powder lubricant. All the bullets are seating fine now. No ripples! All smooth walls and cycle through his action perfectly. Thanks for all the suggestions! My shooting partner is relieved.
     
  2. cohunt

    cohunt Well-Known Member

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    technically they are not cannelure groves-- here is the difference between drive band, and grooved bullets :
    Drive Band Bullet: A bullet where the shaft of the bullet conforms to the land diameter of the barrel and should be in contact with the faces of the lands. The drive band diameter of the bullet conforms to the groove diameter of the barrel and should seal the barrel against gas blowing past the bullet. The total width of the drive bands must be less than 50% of the length of the engraved section of the bullet where bullet material is displaced. Displaced material volume is less than 50% of the volume of material that would be displaced, if the bullet had no drive bands.

    Grooved Bullet: A bullet where the shaft diameter of the bullet is in relationship to the groove diameter of the barrel. The shaft of the bullet may be under size and may not seal the barrel against gas blowing past the bullet. The depth to which grooves are cut into the shaft of the bullet, do not conform to the land diameter of the barrel and are deeper than the land standoff of the barrel is high. The total length where bullet material is displaced, is more than 50% of the length of the bullet shaft that is in contact with the barrel.
     
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  3. CO_Guy

    CO_Guy Well-Known Member

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    The crimp is placed correctly, as you can see the width of the groove and the placement is about right in the middle, just too much of a crimp. I crimp TTSXs just fine for my magnums.
     
  4. Alibiiv

    Alibiiv Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Glad to read that you've figured it out. Unless the caliber is extremely heavy in the recoil department, or going in a tubular fed rifle, I never crimp my reloads. I've been reloading for many years, 55+, have never had a bullet pull out on me. And unless the bullet has a crimping grove/cannular you might get away with a very "light" crimp but nothing more, otherwise you will run in to the same problem. I'm really glad that you asked the question, read the replies and tried the suggestions; you didn't throw the reloader under the bus.
     
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  5. Poppadoer

    Poppadoer Well-Known Member

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    Tried it both ways and have better results with no-crimp.
     
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  6. Edd

    Edd Well-Known Member

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    I disagree.
     
  7. Poppadoer

    Poppadoer Well-Known Member

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    You can disagree but it was my experience,not yours.wish you well.
     
  8. DUSTY NOGGIN

    DUSTY NOGGIN Well-Known Member

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    i wouldnt crimp at all if your case "trim to length" ends up on a groove ( like in your picture), if too much crimp , it will just bend the mouth right into that void and itll shave the case mouth off and smear it down your bore

    when i load a barnes i try to have the mouth end up on the larger bearing surface , if i can trim within specs to do that , i will trim to match that jump

    another point about the barnes is , id recommend trying to seat so that at least three of the high points make contact with the neck, if only 2 points are touching very easy to knock out of concentricity .. too long of a bullet choice , seated too deep can end up with the boat tail below the may not be supporting in bottom of the the neck ... always good to do a side comparison on how deep they are in there .. a 270 or a 30-06 chances are you will hit at least three of the bands .. but with other cartridge options with shorter necks , you may not get alot of choice when it comes to jump
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2019
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  9. CO_Guy

    CO_Guy Well-Known Member

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    I completely agree. I started crimping for my WSMs which have a very short throat and noticed slippage under rather low force.
     
  10. jpope02

    jpope02 Well-Known Member

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    What is a VLD TYPE Chamfer tool?
     
  11. Alibiiv

    Alibiiv Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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  12. DUSTY NOGGIN

    DUSTY NOGGIN Well-Known Member

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    what gets me is vld is acronym for very low drag .. .right ???

    now we have very low drag chamfer tools ??

    for when a standard drag chamfer tool just wont do ... heheheh
     
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  13. feelinducky

    feelinducky Well-Known Member

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    Did you check the diameter of the bullet? Maybe its off spec? Also these are monolithic bullets not jacketed.
     
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  14. redleg1013

    redleg1013 Well-Known Member

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    Cool, glad to see you got it figured out.