Muzzle breaks.

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by bwalker, Aug 14, 2004.

  1. bwalker

    bwalker Well-Known Member

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    I have looked at a few of these divices and like the idea of them, but what I dont care for is the added length and the noise they generate. Has any one tried getting a rifle magnaported? I am talking about there EDM machining process breaks, not the type that threads on a barrel.
     
  2. Jeff In TX

    Jeff In TX Well-Known Member

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    I had my .270 featherweight mag-na-ported as the 6 .5 pound gun kicks like a mule.

    Before mag-na-porting it kicked like a mule
    After mag-na-porting it still kicks like a mule, only it's louder.

    I wasted my money on the process. I saw no reduction in recoil.

    Save your money. If you don't want a brake for the reasons you listed, try one of those recoil systems that utilized a hydraulic recoil pad. I've never tried one, but would be interested in how it performs.
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I have several rifles Magna ported and there is a definite advantage in that it reduces the barrel climb significantly!
    My .375 H&H shot with full loads on a benchrest barely lifts off the front bag whilst an identical rifle will climb about a foot into the air.
    The recoil is still there but the porting helps greatly in follow through and faster recovery time.
     
  4. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Bwalker,

    If your looking to reduce felt recoil, DO NOT HAVE YOUR RIFLE MAGNA-PORTED.

    This process was designed for big bore handguns to help control muzzle jump. It was not intended to be used on rifles by design but has been misused for along time in this mannor.

    THe magna-port system will not reduce felt recoil. All it will do is keep the muzzle down which actually transmits more recoil energy to your shoulder in a straighter line.

    When the rifle lifts in recoil, it absords alot of that recoil energy. When it is kept from doing this, your shoulder gets all the recoil energy transmitted to it.

    Just to prove my point, Magna-Ports owner Mr. Kelly had to design a system called Magna-Brake with is an actual muzzle brake designed to do what the porting will not, reduce felt recoil.

    If you want to stop muzzle jump, go ahead, if you want to reduce felt recoil, do it right and use a brake.

    In my shop I highly recommend the Holland Quick Discharge muzzle brakes and have yet to have a customer not be totally amazed with the amount of recoil reduction they got. They are simply amazing and the only brake I will use is the customer does not demand something else.

    Good Shooting!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  5. sniper2

    sniper2 Well-Known Member

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    Gunsmith named R.L. Matthews in Calhoun,Ga.
    makes and installs some mighty effecient brakes, you can easily tell the difference in recoil and they aren't as noisy as some!
    Montana muzzle brakes also make some great brakes.
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    If you're getting pounded hard enough, you will definitely not mind the extra 2 inches or the noise. Just went to a heavier barrel and a muzzle break, and the felt recoil is amazingly lighter! Being able to shoot comfortably definitely helps my groups, and it makes it a lot more fun to do so! The only time I would not recommend a break is if you are going to be shooting from cramped quarters, such as a tree stand that is built too small to maneuver in. If this is the case, I'd entertain the idea of using a different rifle or a bigger stand. If you are not limited to space, go for the break.
     
  7. Jim/Iowa

    Jim/Iowa Member

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    I try out alot of hand loads in 338 and 7mm mag, looking for ???. At the bench I was getting beat up trying new loads out with either rifle. I went to brakes and have never looked back. When hunting it makes a lot of noise but at 60 yrs old and one shot its not going to damage my hearing anymore than the service did.
    Jim
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Jim,
    One cool thing I've noticed over the years is that Muzzle breaks will throw the noise everywhere but where you are. On more than one occasion I've shot a Deer and had many more run to where I was. Have taken many doubles this way, and attribute it all to the break! A few years back, I couldn't get a clear shot on a monster buck, and finally after an hour of watching him, fired into the tree he was under to see if it would give me a shot. He immediately disappeared and within 2 minutes, walked within 6 feet of me! Muzzle breaks offer more than the reduction of recoil! I love em!
     
  9. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    I agree there are other advantages to using a muzzle brake then just recoil reduction.

    While many say that the noise of dramatically louder with a brake, I feel, for the shooter, it really is not a great deal more.

    Most who really hate muzzle brakes are those that have been off to the side of a rifle when it was fired and they got the full brunt of the brake.

    I have been using brakes on rifle and handcannons for years and have never had a problem with ringing my ears in the field.

    I can not say the same for my big bore revolvers that I hunt with. In my opinion, these are much harder on the ears then any muzzle brake.

    From the number of brakes I machine a year, for everyone that goes out, I generally get two more come in from guys that have shot the braked rifle and now se no reason to put up with the beating of an unbraked magnum.

    There is also another advantage to using a brake. If any of you have doen load testing at 1000 yards and had a spotter sit up near the target in a protected location while you shoot and report your groups over radios.

    If you have ever been the target watcher, you know the different sound a braked rifle makes compared to a bare muzzle.

    I discovered this while shooting the 50 BMG. My father wanted to try a few pulls at 1000 yards so I when up and spotted his hits.

    Upon firing, at least when the sound finally reached my position, it sounded like he was shooting through a muffler. There was no crack at all to the blast and it was almost quite at 1000 yards.

    Comparing that to other rifles such as my 300 RUM that produces a much more noticable crack and instead of a soft BOOM, it is a loud crack.

    This really means little to the big game hunter but for predator hunters that may set up ambush sites every mile or so and call yotes, this can make a real difference.

    I am not saying that the yotes will not hear the rifle with a brake, only that they are not as spooked by it because of its lower intensity crack.

    Good Shooting!!!

    50
     
  10. LB

    LB Well-Known Member

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    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Most who really hate muzzle brakes are those that have been off to the side of a rifle when it was fired and they got the full brunt of the brake.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    From where I stand, (or sit, as the case may be) that is a valid reason.

    In other words, I would like it if other shooters, like myself, involved in small bore load evaluation were segregated from muzzle brakes & ported barrels. LB
     
  11. 4ked Horn

    4ked Horn Writers Guild

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    I know this has been covered before so a short answer will do.

    Is there a difference in accuracy between a brake with ports all around and a brake that dosen't have ports on the bottom? I am considering a brake for my rem vls .308 to make self spotting easyier.

    Also (for what it's worth,) I had the pleasure of shooting a ruger ultralight m77 with a slimline brake in .30-06 next to my ruger ultralight without a brake in .243 win.

    The 06 had 165 gr bullets at regular velocity and the .243 had 100 gr bullets also at standard velocity. The recoil was much less from the 06 than the .243 In fact my wife also fired them side by side and after shooting th 06 she turned to the owner and offered to buy the gun. That just dosen't happen very day.

    Sadly the answer was that it wasn't for sale.
     
  12. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    LB,

    What I was trying to point out was that the best place to be around a braked rifle is the shooters position.

    I agree that there is alot of problems created by brakes at crowded ranges and this is where most of the sour opinions on them come from.

    If you have a rifle with a brake, you must follow certain guidelines to avoid subjecting others to the blast of the muzzle.

    This is only polite and will help prevent bad opinions of muzzle brakes.

    Being a 50 BMG shooter for several years, you learn even before shooting to always be aware of your surroundings, whenever I shoot my 50, everyone within 20 yards will be instructed to stand behind me and I do my best to never touch off a round without letting everyone know the shot is going off.

    This is just good muzzle brake practices.

    I would also agree that alot of shooters using braked rifles think it is "cool" to have others feel the "power" of their cannons. THis is a very disrespectful and irresponsible thing to do and should never be condoned.

    Good Shooting!!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  13. Mysticplayer

    Mysticplayer Writers Guild

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    Kirby, Couldn't agree more with your thoughts on etiquette.

    Especially with the larger magnums and 50BMG, letting someone feel the powder may be dangerous to their health. Be very considerate when using a muzzle brake. NO ONE likes to get their ear drums hammered.

    Also, make sure that spotting scope, tripods and other gear are not in the way of the blast. going to get very expensive replacing stuff blown off nearby tables.

    I use muzzle brakes often and really like their benefits for reducing recoil. They are noisy but I protect my ears with the best ear muffs and plugs I can get.

    The location of the holes in the brake should have no effect on the accuracy of a departing bullet. The bullet should be in front of the exhaust gases so really doesn't care which way they are vented.

    I have used brakes with only side ports, no bottom ports and all around. No difference in accuracy. However, there was a difference is blowing up dust so prefer those that don't vent down.

    When looking at muzzle brakes, remember that a single expansion brake works best with the largest volume of holes. Doesn't matter if that is done with 50 holes or 4 big ones.

    A baffle brake - fishgill, multihole, or sail types work better then a single expansion brake. The larger the surface area of a brake (diameter, not length) the better. The larger the gas volume and pressure, the more effective a brake. The quieter a brake (holes pointing forward) the less effective it is. The closer the exit hole in the brake is to the bullet diameter, the more effective the brake (try for 20 thou over bullet diameter).

    Jerry
     
  14. 4ked Horn

    4ked Horn Writers Guild

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    Jerry please expand on your last two paragraphs. Mostly the single expansion stuff and the volume/pressure also. Are you saying that the bigger the volune inside the brake chamber the better? If you have alot of holes or a few big ones how can you have high pressure?

    Sorry my questions are vague but I just got a call and I have to go unlock a car.(thats my job.) [​IMG]