Mountain rifle scope

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by JDBraddy, Aug 8, 2019.


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  1. blackaj

    blackaj Well-Known Member

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    Ha Ha that's awesome..

    In all seriousness though I did shoot my bull last season from one mountain to the next with my 7.4 lb mountain rifle (940 yards).
    I was using a Zeiss V4 that didn't track worth a crap, the only reason I was able to take the shot was because I figured out where my scope correction for that range actually was the day before.

    I'm stating from personal experience that most hunting scopes aren't up to the task of tracking accurately enough to take really long shots.

    It took me years of fiddling with ballistics and BC's trying to get everything to match up, before I actually started doing proper tall target tracking tests.
    Lets just say the results were eye opening..
    I ended up selling every scope I owned (VX6, VX5, V4, Z5, Vortex HSLR, and V6) and currently run MK5's and soon a NF NX8.

    Again an extra 4-8 oz is well worth the gain in my opinion, if it's just too much weight I'd strongly suggest working out;)
     
    Hand Skills likes this.
  2. Mkeitz

    Mkeitz New Member

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    Just curious, was your Zeiss V4 one of the current crop?
     
  3. PredatorSlayer

    PredatorSlayer Well-Known Member

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    Most scopes have tracking error that needs to be accounted for, even the Mark 5 and definitely the nightforces. Tangent Theta is the most consistent I have ever seen. You pay for that though. There are ballistic apps that allow you to account for scope error.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
  4. blackaj

    blackaj Well-Known Member

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    It was last years model

    My MK5's both tracked within 1/8" dialed up 50 MOA, that's pretty much zero error.
    Have you ever done a tracking test on a MK5?
    NF is pretty much the gold standard for tracking and repeatability, go to a LR match and see how many guys are running them.
     
  5. PredatorSlayer

    PredatorSlayer Well-Known Member

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    Sorry man - Tangent Theta is the true gold standard in tracking and repeatability. I have owned MK5’s and several different nightforce scopes - none of them touch Tangent Theta. If you haven’t owned one, they are worth researching before you crown leupold or nightforce as the gold standard.
     
  6. Aoudad shooter1975

    Aoudad shooter1975 Well-Known Member

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    Didn't know TT were around 1,000 bucks...glad they are the gold standard but I think the OP wanted something around 1,000 dollars...I'd love a TT but 3K plus is a lot of bread--and I'd rather spend my extra funds hunting...

    Building a lightweight rifle is more about all the other stuff you carry...I've done a couple sheep hunts, I'm doing my first pack in ibex hunt in Asia if I said 10oz didn't matter here and there my pack would weigh 80lbs...
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
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  7. jsthntn247

    jsthntn247 Well-Known Member

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    I’d go with a sigjtron 6-24 at 24oz or a Vortex razor ld lh at about 16 oz. If you don’t need to dial the Super Sinper ultra light at 10oz gets pretty good reviews.
     
  8. PredatorSlayer

    PredatorSlayer Well-Known Member

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    Right - the obvious answer is a VX5HD. Sub $1000, lightweight and mine have tracked well enough out to 1200 yards to hunt with.
     
    middleofnowhere likes this.
  9. blackaj

    blackaj Well-Known Member

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    Don't be sorry
    We're all entitled to our opinions.
    BTW welcome to the forum, good to have your expertise..
     
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  10. Litehiker

    Litehiker Well-Known Member

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    I have a 28 oz. Bushnell LRTS 4.5 - 18 x 44 (30 mm tube) illuminated G3 reticle on my 6 lb. 3 oz 6.5 PRC Browning X-Bolt Pro W/Talley rings.(FFP, mil/mil)
    $976. from Optics Planet.
    For another $900. you can get a better 28 oz. Nightforce NX8 2.5 - 20 x 50 illuminated (FFP, mil/mil. Getting it next year.

    Eric B.
     
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  11. JDBraddy

    JDBraddy Member

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    That's kind of the point of this thread, as I said in my origional post, I've never really been hunting, but would like to go. I don't have specific plans yet, and don't really know what I need/want. My other rifles are a 10lb 6PPC, and a 17lb F-Open rifle with barrels in .284 and 6-Dasher. I have a March 10-60X52 that's not mounted right now, guess I could mount that untill I figure it out. I'm 54, out of shape, and live in central Texas, doubt I'm in good enough shape to go backpacking up and down the northwestern rockies, but don't think I'd really enjoy sitting in a blind, 50yds from a feeder. I figure I've got maybe 10 years left to do anything before my health begins to limit even my current options.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
  12. Jerry M

    Jerry M Well-Known Member

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    Weight is very important in the mountains. On a trip to western Montana a few years ago, I carried an 11 pound pre-64 model 70 Win, McMillian Stock, with a NF 3.5x15 scope. My buddy had a 9 pound Remington 700 with Nikon scope. I definitely am rethinking my rifle & scope combination for our return trip next October.
    People may say go to the gym. But there is no (reasonable cost) substitute for walking in the high altitudes of the mountains. I am older than you and out of shape. It's important to get the proper equipment. I encourage you do get something you like and are comfortable carrying. Rifle & scope combination, a proper fitting pack, and proper clothes for the environment are all very important in mountain (or other extreme types of) hunting.

    Good Luck

    Jerry
     
    Hand Skills likes this.
  13. Tangent

    Tangent Well-Known Member

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    Lots of opinions here, but I think rifle weight is generally overblown by most (not all) hunters. I was born & raised ‘out west’ and backpack hunt every year. I hike 3 to 15 miles any day I get out, and an 11 pound gun has never limited me (and I’m not in the same shape I was on my 20’s)

    I also shoot my rifles about once a week past 1,000 yards all summer, so I prefer an optic that can accommodate both hobbies.

    I’m in the process of having a Ti/Ca build put together so I can have a ~1 pound TBAC can, bipod, ~30 oz optic, and still be in the 10-11 pound mark.

    To me, most important features are probably reliability & field of view. I prefer FFP, capped windage, and exposed locking elevation (zero stop as a minimum).

    Like most here, I’m still searching for the perfect optic...let us know when you find it ;)
     
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  14. FlyGuy11

    FlyGuy11 Member LRH Team Member

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    All this tracking talk; yawn. I love the H59 reticle and never dial. The new NF SHV F1 I will have to get use to but plan to use the hold-over method. Grids gentlemen, grids etched onto the glass will eliminate dialing error with the exception of really long shots which I would not take on a game animal. The distance of shot is the *Rule 1 Violation*al choice that we all must make a judgement call on as hunters and our practiced skills.