Most accurate powder scale under $200

epags

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As has been mentioned already the ChargeMaster gets great reviews but I've had them all and I went back to the beam scale, if you go with the beam you can send it to me and I'll tune it up for you if you like
Good Morning and a question for you: For my rifles I throw each charge then put it on my RCBS scale and then trickle charge. My question is will you share your tune up procedure? I clean the pivot shaft and 'bearings' and periodically verify w/calibration weights, is there more to tuning up?
Thanks in advance
 

iflyskyhigh

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Everyone is correct. Million ways to skin a cat.

If you can find one of these get it. They measure out to a hundredth (0.01) of a grain.

Bald Eagle Powder Scale

I throw the charge in my Lyman Gen 6. Then trickle into the pan with a Redding powder trickler while it sits on the BE Scale. Load singe stage style on my Dillon 550.

It's not as fast as the $500-1000 scales but I can load to the grain.

With good case prep and this method I get SD's in the 5-6 range and ES's in the 12-15 range.

My factory Savage 10FCP-SR (in an MDT chassis) shoots .45-.50 MOA groups using this process. Took a long time to refine the process and get to this point, but I'm confident the powder measurement accuracy has a lot to do with it. In order to get a factory gun to shoot that well everything else has to be perfect.

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ButterBean

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Good Morning and a question for you: For my rifles I throw each charge then put it on my RCBS scale and then trickle charge. My question is will you share your tune up procedure? I clean the pivot shaft and 'bearings' and periodically verify w/calibration weights, is there more to tuning up?
Thanks in advance
Your method will work fine and yes there is more to tune up and everyone has a different opinion on it so no offense but I'm not opening that can of worms, but I will put my scales against the big name tuner with confidence
 

one3

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Tryed eltroinc scales. They all failed, went back to beam. Started out with a beam, in the 60's never failed me. Bought a few elcttroiic scales, treated them like eggs, they all failed.
 

archangel485

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Several mentioned it already but beam scales are extremely precise if your eye is precise. The key is to make sure you're looking at the needle from the same position every time to avoid parallax effect. I used to have mine set up where I would rest my head on a very specific spot when looking at it so that every charge I looked at the scale the same way. Works really good.

Another option (and what I'm doing now) is to look for an old analytical balance from a university lab or something. Ohaus has been making digital display analytical balances (accuracy to .001 grams) for decades, and you can sometimes find one on ebay for well within your price range. I have picked up a couple that were built in the 80s and they work great, I use one and a friend of mine the other. Keep in mind these will not come with "grains" as a unit, so you'll have to do a little math and program a custom unit, all of which I'm happy to help with if you go that route.
 

Coyote Shadow Tracker

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I have a RCBS Chargemaster with a GemPro along with a trickler. It takes time.
Oh hell just splurge and get yourself a "PROMETHEUS" it's electronic, but has a "Beam scale" included and it is fast to give the most accurate measurements. Don't bother with a charghe master then put on another beam or Gem pro. to get an accurarte weight. Do it all in one shot.
 

LRNut

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I have a vintage RCBS Dual Beam Scale that I bought new 40 years ago along with check weights. It has never failed me. I have also recently purchased a Franklin Arsenal Intellidropper that I have not used yet. You can use the Inlelidropper as a scale.

This is my old RCBS Beam Scale, (not mine in the picture but the same scale):

This is the best (or was the best) beam scale money could buy IMO. It will measure a kernal of powder without a problem. My complaint with cheaper beam scales is their magnetic dampening would result in different weights.

As far as less expensive electronic scales, I have tried several. The only one I have confidence in is the RCBS Chargemaster 1500, but I don't use the dispensing unit; I use a Redding BR30 to throw a close charge, then trickle in with my fingers. I bought a Hornady scale for my CO place, but it was terrible - it would drift .1 to .2 so often I was using a check weight after each powder charge. One trick to using less expensive electronic scales is to wait a few seconds for it to settle after adding the kernal that will bring it to its desired weight. Then lift up the pan and see if it measures the same. Then tap it down, check, then lift it off completely and set back down. All three checks should match. Using this method with my RCBS, I have as much confidence as I do with my A&D. One final note: after I calibrate my RCBS, I check the weight with three bullets that I know are 100, 180, and 240 grains. All three must weigh correctly after recalibration or I start over.

The A&D is hands down the best; it measures more accurately than a beam scale and much faster. If you can at all afford one, get it; you won't be disappointed. But I am quite confident using my RCBS as described. A little slower than an A&D, but it works.
 

ButterBean

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Not to sidetrack the thread but the most common issue I see is a beam scale not set up properly from the start, and while it will weigh accurately it just don't give you the warm fuzzies
 

ButterBean

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This is the best (or was the best) beam scale money could buy IMO. It will measure a kernal of powder without a problem. My complaint with cheaper beam scales is their magnetic dampening would result in different weights.

As far as less expensive electronic scales, I have tried several. The only one I have confidence in is the RCBS Chargemaster 1500, but I don't use the dispensing unit; I use a Redding BR30 to throw a close charge, then trickle in with my fingers. I bought a Hornady scale for my CO place, but it was terrible - it would drift .1 to .2 so often I was using a check weight after each powder charge. One trick to using less expensive electronic scales is to wait a few seconds for it to settle after adding the kernal that will bring it to its desired weight. Then lift up the pan and see if it measures the same. Then tap it down, check, then lift it off completely and set back down. All three checks should match. Using this method with my RCBS, I have as much confidence as I do with my A&D. One final note: after I calibrate my RCBS, I check the weight with three bullets that I know are 100, 180, and 240 grains. All three must weigh correctly after recalibration or I start over.

The A&D is hands down the best; it measures more accurately than a beam scale and much faster. If you can at all afford one, get it; you won't be disappointed. But I am quite confident using my RCBS as described. A little slower than an A&D, but it works.
The 304 is one of my favorites and is precise but it has a lot of beam surface to get moving for measuring powder charges
 
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