Minimum impact velocity for 300 gr SMK?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by ktg, Jan 17, 2005.

  1. ktg

    ktg Well-Known Member

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    I know several here have used the .338 300gr SMK for extra long range deer hunting with excellent results (BIG holes). At what impact velocity will that bullet still punch a big hole in a mule deer?
     
  2. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Ktg,

    The size of the hole is really unimportant to be honest, its the location of the impact that is critical at long range.

    As long as the 338 300 gr SMK stays super sonic, it is more then potent enough for any mule deer when hit in the vitals. Depending on the round used to drive this big bullet that will allow a max range from around 900 yards out to past 2200 yards.

    My 338 Kahn will drive this bullet fast enough to stay super sonic out past 2200 yards I have no doubt in my mind that it would probably still punch though any mule deer at 2000 yards from any ethical shooting angle.

    Good Shooting!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    So how bad does the bullet deform when hit with that kind of punch as it launches. I guess that doesn't really matter so long as it does so consistently.

    JK
     
  4. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Jay Kyle,

    There are several theories about this and many dedicated extreme range BR shooters do not want their bullet bases below the case neck/shoulder junction to prevent any bullet deforming.

    My opinion is that in one of my rifles built for extreme range shooting, The neck of the chamber will be roughly 0.001" over loaded neck diameter, The throat will be 0.0002" to 0.0005" over bullet diameter and thus there not much room for bullet deformation.

    Now if the bullets are seated very deep into the case, there may be an issue like this but again, I have not seen it so far even in my Allen Magnums which are running in the +3500 fps with extremely long bullets with a large portion of bullet below the neck shoulder area.

    I may have not seen this because I use Wildcat Bullets that have a very think jacket, at least the ones I am using and this may prevent this problem.

    I do know that every bullet that is fired will be deformed to some degree from the pressure driving it down the bore. This is needed, if it did not happen, accuracy would suffer because this bumping up of the bullet seals the bore and provides an accurate fit to the bore.

    This is why Match bullets generally are more accurate then big game bullets. Sure they are held to tighter specs as far as consistancy but just as important is their relatively thin jackets bump up much better to fit the bore and groove diameter better then a big game bullet.

    This is why hard bullets can be so tricky to get to shoot very tight groups. Take the X bullet for example. If you have a bore that matches the diameter of the X bullet perfectly, they are amazingly accurate, if your bore is a bit tight or a bit loose, consistancy will suffer because the bullet will not conform as well to the mismatched bore diameter.

    Good Shooting!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    That makes a lot of sense.
    When the bullet is in travel down the barrel it is in essence a small ballon (to give a sense of the elasticity with the forces present), thus it would seem to me that as the lands scribe onto the bullet the displaced lead must flow somewhere, I imagine that would be into the valleys between the lands and forward into the ogive area - given the pressure wave on the rear of the bullet - possibly deforming the ogive. I understand we're splitting hairs here but it is interesting none-the-less. All that said, this is theoretical as I have no empirical evidence to back it up.

    JK
     
  6. ewallace

    ewallace Well-Known Member

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    The Mule deer I shot in Colorado had a impact velocity of 1437 and 1376 ft-lbs of energy. The deer was shot at 1850 meters elevation was 10000 foot above sea level.
    Crow Mag