Mercury Vs Mechanical Recoil reducers?

engineer40

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Does anyone have experience or opinions on the mercury vs mechanical recoil reducers that get installed into the rifle stocks?

Does one actually reduce more recoil than the other?

Would I have to worry about either one wearing out?

Prices seem similar, although the mercury ones add more weight to the rifle.


Thanks!
 

J E Custom

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Does anyone have experience or opinions on the mercury vs mechanical recoil reducers that get installed into the rifle stocks?

Does one actually reduce more recoil than the other?

Would I have to worry about either one wearing out?

Prices seem similar, although the mercury ones add more weight to the rifle.


Thanks!

In the process of developing an efficient muzzle brake we had to test all recoil devices to see what we were dealing with and how well each worked.

each recoil device was tested on a recoil device that not only compared one to the other it also measured actual recoil with a margin of less than 1 ft/lb.

In testing Mercury type devices we found that they were the least effective of all in reducing recoil energy. they did reduce recoil velocity but when replaced with a solid weight that was the same weight it reduced the recoil energy and velocity by the same amount. If you take a 16oz weight and add it to any rifle the recoil will be reduced by a percentage of the rifle weight. so the effect will be greater on a very light rifle than a heavy one.

Here are all of the types of recoil reducers and there standing in recoil reduction. (Note ; there is no mention of brands just the type).

www.jecustom.com - FAQ's (Look at the second line item in the FAQ section).

J E CUSTOM
 
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engineer40

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Thanks for the response J E Custom. I do believe Brakes work the best on high powered rifles. My gun that kicks the most is a 12 gauge I use with hunting slug loads. And I did actually put a muzzle brake on it and I'd say it worked about....... 0%.

In fact I know it didn't work because my dad has the same exact shotgun and we used 3 different types of ammo; one right after the other in each gun and could not tell the difference in recoil. Researching more afterwards, it appears this is normally the case with shotguns.

Maybe for the shotgun I'll just wrap a pound of lead in a sock and shove it in the butt stock. :)

I do use muzzle brakes on other rifles and have been happy with them. Thanks!
 

J E Custom

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Thanks for the response J E Custom. I do believe Brakes work the best on high powered rifles. My gun that kicks the most is a 12 gauge I use with hunting slug loads. And I did actually put a muzzle brake on it and I'd say it worked about....... 0%.

In fact I know it didn't work because my dad has the same exact shotgun and we used 3 different types of ammo; one right after the other in each gun and could not tell the difference in recoil. Researching more afterwards, it appears this is normally the case with shotguns.

Maybe for the shotgun I'll just wrap a pound of lead in a sock and shove it in the butt stock. :)

I do use muzzle brakes on other rifles and have been happy with them. Thanks!

Your welcome.
I though you were talking about rifles, Shotguns are a different thing.

Muzzle brakes don't work very well, if at all on shotguns because of the projectile weight compared to the powder charge. A muzzle brake relies on gas and pressure to work and with the small powder charge and large shot weight and the weight of the shotgun, the recoil is almost unchanged unless you add weight like you mentioned.

Big bore rifles are less effected by muzzle brakes because of the same gas to bullet weight percentage (Big heavy bullets and smaller powder charges).

The recoil velocity is Fairly high on shotguns because of there weight. A proper fitting shotgun can help in the felt recoil and a gas operated shotgun will also reduce some recoil.

Most shotguns are ported to reduce the recoil but they are not very effective ether.

J E CUSTOM
 

engineer40

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That's............................. fairly ridiculous. :)

I have plenty of rifles. I own this shotgun because my family deer camp is held in the shotgun only area of Michigan.

I keep trying to talk myself into finding more uses for the gun. Makes me sad to see it sitting unused most of the time. Although most likely it will continue to just get pulled out a couple times a year for deer hunting.


Does anyone else have experience with the mercury or mechanical recoil reducers? Thanks!
 

barnesuser28

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It wouldnt take much to improve the design of that muzzle brake on the .950 JDJ. I have noticed ALOT of brakes on the market are leaving quite a bit of recoil reduction potential on the table.
 

alcesgigas

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Bettles Field, AK
I had a mercury (11 ounce) in a 375 H&H, no brake on the 10.5# (loaded and scoped) rifle. Seemed to slow the recoil down and thus--at least to me--was more pleasant to shoot than any of my 270s'. Now it's externally fastened to my Edge (21#) that has a Magnum 4-Port Muscle brake, but shooting 300 gr. Bergers up to 3015 fps. Slower recoil yet and astonishingly pleasant to shoot.

Mechanics will wear out; mercury can't. I haven't a clue what, other than weight, would domesticate a shotgun...
 

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