Medalist for a Mark V

Bearcat 74

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Jul 5, 2006
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6
Hey guys, got a couple questions. I have a US made stainless Weatherby Mark V 300 9 lug that accuracy is horrible to kind. 6" vertical strings are the norm at 100yds. It has the old Mattel plastic stock and from reading around that could be a lot of the problem. I thought about bedding it, but I have only ever bedded one rifle, so I just figured I would look for a new stock. The 300 is way to big for me to hunt with around here, but I would like for it to be somewhat accurate. I do not want to spring for a McM, I am borderline getting rid of the rifle anyway.


How good is the Medalist and would I see any improvemnt in accuracy?


I loaded 180NBT's over Imr7828 82.0 up to 85.5grs with Weatherby Brass and Fed primers, Vari-XIII 6.5-20 and all loads sucked equally bad. I thought about H4831, but figure I would waste money on a stock before wasting it on components.


Thanks
 

Dr. Vette

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Here are some tips on Vertical Stringing from an old thread:

http://www.longrangehunting.com/forums/f19/vertical-stringing-37853/


"Tips onVertical Problems


1. A lot of rifles are muzzle heavy. Some rifles have too heavy a barrel and this causes vertical problems, especially those who shoot free recoil

2. Firing pin coming out of hole in bolt in the cocked position. This will cause poor ignition. Take bolt out of rifle and look in firing pin hole. If you cannot see entire end of firing pin it has come out of the hole.

3. Firing pin dragging in bolt or shroud. Listen to the sound when you dry fire. If not the same sound each shot something is wrong.

4. Trigger sear too much spring. Hold trigger in firing position and push down on sear with your thumb. If it is hard to push down, this will cause vertical problems.

5. Firing pin spring too weak or too strong will cause vertical problems. If you think this is the problem change springs and see what happens.

6. Tightening front sand bag too tight on stock. When you try to pull rifle back by hand and rifle feels like it is stuck in the bag it is too tight. Rifle should move in sand bags evenly, not jerk or chatter when pulling back by hand.

7. Action not level with top of stock running down at muzzle end. Rifle will recoil up at butt end causing vertical.

8. The load that are shooting can too light or heavy and can cause vertical problems.

9. Bench technique not same every shot. One example, should against stock one shot and not the next.

10. Bad primers – if getting vertical try other primers.

11. Bad scope, if scope is bad from shooting vertical, if you change your load in anyway and vertical goes away it is not your scope.

12. Rifle not balanced, it does not recoil right, jumps in bag. If rifle is built properly this will not happen.

13. Some stocks are very flexible. This can cause vertical.

14. Front sandbag too hard. I personally have never had a rifle that will shoot consistent with a rock hard front sandbag. It always causes vertical or other unexplained shots.


Other Tips:

1. Head on front rest loose. A lot of rests have movement even when you tighten them as much as you can. This can cause unexplained shots.

2. Some 30 mm scope rings are not getting tight enough to hold scope. Scope slipping in rings under recoil. This will cause point of aim movement.

3. Keep shell holders clean, in press and priming tool. I have seen so much dirt in shell holders that cases are sized crocked on body. Also primers cutting primer pockets bigger shaving brass as you seat the primer.

4. Whenever you can, set up so you can load watching conditions on the range as you load your ammo. That way you will be aware of any changes in conditions since your last group and you will be mentally prepared for the new condition.

5. Learn to look at whole field of flags, not just the row in front of you. A lot of times conditions change away from you will cause shot to go out of group before change in condition shows up in front of your bench.

6. When you chamfer the inside of your case necks make sure they are smooth enough that they don’t peel jacket material off when you seat the bullet.

7. I see people walking around with case necks turned up in the loading block. A lot of the time there is condensation dropping from the roof of your loading area. If one drop of water gets in case you are in trouble on the shot. How many times have you had a bad low shot when it has been raining and you have been walking around with your cases turned up in your block?

8. Learn to keep head down and follow through when you are shooting each shot.

9. I hear a lot of discussion about low shots in a group and apparently this occurs a lot on the fifth shot. If it is your 5th shot most of the time you can bet you are doing something at the bench.

10. If 5th shot is a problem, which everyone does at times, we do what I call wishing the last shot in. We just aim, pull the trigger, and do not worry about the wind flags.

11. This year alone I have seen nine lock rings on scopes that are not tight. Guess what that does to your group? Make sure yours are tight.

12. When you realize that the wind is your friend you will become a much better benchrest shooter.

13. Practice in wind, not in good condition.

14. Pay attention to angle changes on flags. Even though you see the same color angle changes make a big difference in your groups.

15. The longer you wait between shots when a condition is changing the more the condition change will affect your bullet.

16. If you do not know how to read wind flags or have never seen a wind flag try to shoot your group with the flags all going in one direction.

17. Equipment at bench has to work flawlessly. If it doesn’t get it fixed or get rid of it. We need all our attention on wind flags.

18. Learn to shoot with both eyes open so you can see more of the conditions.

19. Free recoil shooters should be sure rifle hits shoulder squarely on recoil, not on edge of shoulder or muscle of arm.

20. Should have your own stool to sit on so that you can sit at the bench comfortably for you.

21. Hunting rifle barrels – do not get cleaned enough. If you keep barrel clean it will shoot better for you. You should clean barrel good after every 10 to 12 shots.

22. Most hunting rifles will not put first shot after cleaning with rest of shots. So after cleaning if you have a rifle that won’t group first shot shoot one fouling shot before going hunting or before you shoot for group size.

23. When working up a load for your hunting rifle take your time and do not let the barrel get hot on you."


My own thoughts based on Weatherbys -

Take the action out of the stock, put a bit of Play-Doh under the recoil lug (maybe 1/4 inch worth) and the action, then reinstall action into stock. Use your hands to push the action into the stock ( you don't have to screw it back in) and see how much Play-Doh is still in place. I found 1/4 inch gap under one of my Vanguards recently - different rifle, same company. I've bedded the recoil lug now to fill that in.

Check the pressure points under the barrel near the front of the stock. See if they are equal, or if they show evidence of unequal pressure.

My Dad's Mk V stainless hates to get hot when shooting. Yours may too.

I assume your barrel is clean, really clean?

The crown is good?

The rifle should do better than 6 inches without "having to" swap stocks. All of my Mark V Weatherbys shoot very well using factory ammo, even my plastic stocked ones.
 
Last edited:

Bearcat 74

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Jul 5, 2006
Messages
6
Dr. Vette, thanks for the info, I will recheck through all that. I can answer these and should have put them in my first post.

I have shot clean bore and fouled bore, with pressure points and floated with plastic cards under the action.

All screws and bolts are torqued to spec.

I have shot it free recoil and with a hand on the forearm and again with one on the barrel.
Bench technique is good, I have no problems with any of my other rifles.

Front bag is soft and placed under the action not out at the forearm.

Time between rounds was 3-5 mins between each shot.

All loads assembled inside my home at my loading bench, chamfer was good, no bullet shaving.

Each charge weighed and verified.

Crown is good.

The barrel is stock, #2 contour I guess?

Scope is good.



As for the 5th shot being out of the group, here is a picture of the groups I routinely get. This is normal, this was 2 groups of 3, the only oddity was the fact that it up 1/3 together near the bull. No scope adjustments were made, nor have any been made because it would be tough to make an adjustment. I have had one group that was right at 2" and I had a couple 3 shot groups that spanned to 5", I should have taken a picture, 1 shot above the bull, one in and one under in a line.

300BeeGroups.jpg
 

roninflag

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Feb 27, 2006
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az
300 too BIG to hunt where?? do you need a 22-250 instead. installing a krieger barrel is the quickest way to have an accurate rifle.
 

Bearcat 74

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Jul 5, 2006
Messages
6
My hunting is done in heavy woods where shots very rarely exceed 50yds and never over 100yds. The Weatherby was a gift and my aim with the rifle was targets out to 600yds, but targets at 100yds are proving to be a problem. I just don't need this horsepower for deer under 100yds.


If I were to ever head west and hunt it would certainly fill the bill if I could get accuracy up.
 

Dr. Vette

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Sounds like you've done a lot of the checking.

Double check the scope mounts (yes, I know, but I've had one get away on me too).

Else I'd check the space in the stock as discussed above. I haven't even shot my 300 Vanguard yet but I'm sure with 1/4 inch of "action float" that may be why the previous owner sold it.

If there is a good gunsmith near you (where are you?) consider having them check the bore.

FYI, it doesn't meet Weatherby's accuracy guarantee, and they are quite good about that even this many years later. Don't feel bad about calling their HQ to see what they say.



PS - one of my Mk V's shot similar to that, and when I pulled it out of the stock it was obvious that it was moving around despite adequate screw torque. Just an FYI.
 

Bearcat 74

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Jul 5, 2006
Messages
6
Thanks again for the reply.


I made sure the bases and rings were torqued and tight before I started, it shot so bad I took the scope off, checked the base screws, remounted and retorqued.


I will give the stock a check like you suggest. I have a lot of devcon if I need to bed it, I have just never tried to bed a Weatherby action, only Savages.


Someone else suggested I call Weatherby, I may give that a try as a last resort as I would love to get it worked out myself.


Thanks again!
 

Dr. Vette

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Messages
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Holland, MI
I asked where you were because if you were at all close I'd help you check out the stock and bed it.

I've done a couple of Weatherby, no problems. B&C stock and (as noted above) factory plastic stock. I'd check out the space in there, but note that once you modify (even bed) the rifle, Weatherby may "void" the warranty. If all appears untouched then you still have a chance. So, don't think of them as "last resort."

Oh, what bases and rings?

If you want to learn about bedding...

Bedding Project - Sniper's Hide Forums
 

Bearcat 74

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Jul 5, 2006
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Sorry about that, I am in Oneida, TN about 1hr north of Knoxville.


Leupold Rings and bases

Hadn't thought about Weatherby voiding the warranty after bedding. Thanks for the link!
 

Bearcat 74

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2006
Messages
6
Guys I found a great looking used Medalist stock made for a German Mark V action. This may be a stupid question, but will this stock made for the German Mark V fit my USA made Mark V?

One guy said there were differences in the guns and it would not interchange and another guy said that it would work, and I don't have any idea.


Thanks
 

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